bunt vs butt what difference

what is difference between bunt and butt

English

Etymology

Unknown. Perhaps a nasalised variant of butt.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Noun

bunt (plural bunts)

  1. (nautical) The middle part, cavity, or belly of a sail; the part of a furled sail which is at the center of the yard.
    The bunt of the sail was green.
  2. A push or shove; a butt.
  3. (baseball, softball) A ball that has been intentionally hit softly so as to be difficult to field, sometimes with a hands-spread batting stance or with a close-hand, choked-up hand position. No swinging action is involved.
    The bunt was fielded cleanly.
  4. (baseball, softball) The act of bunting.
    The manager will likely call for a bunt here.
  5. (aviation) The second half of an outside loop, from level flight to inverted flight.
  6. A fungus (Ustilago foetida) affecting the ear of cereals, filling the grains with a foetid dust; pepperbrand.

Coordinate terms

  • (specific part of a sail): clew
  • (baseball, softball): sacrifice bunt, slash bunt, swinging bunt, squeeze, safety squeeze, suicide squeeze

Translations

Verb

bunt (third-person singular simple present bunts, present participle bunting, simple past and past participle bunted)

  1. To push with the horns; to butt.
  2. To spring or rear up.
  3. (transitive, baseball) To intentionally hit softly with a hands-spread batting stance.
    Jones bunted the ball.
  4. (intransitive, baseball) To intentionally hit a ball softly with a hands-spread batting stance.
    Jones bunted.
  5. (intransitive, aviation) To perform (the second half of) an outside loop.
    We had heard that there was an elite group of three or four pilots in Jodhpur called the “Bunt Club”, who had successfully bunted their aircraft – that is, carried out the second half of an outside loop. In the Bunt, you pushed the nose down, past the vertical and still further, until you were in horizontal inverted flight, and came out on the other side and rolled it out.
  6. (intransitive, nautical) To swell out.
    The sail bunts.
  7. (rare, of a cat) To headbutt affectionately.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:bunt.

Translations

Related terms

  • bunting

See also

  • bunt on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

German

Etymology

From Middle High German bunt, probably from Latin punctus, whence English point. Dutch bont seems to have somewhat earlier attestations in the relevant sense, but the phonetic form (b- for p- and Dutch -o- for -u-) could hint at Middle High German origin. It is therefore unsettled which of the two borrowed from which.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʊnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʊnt
  • Homophone: Bund

Adjective

bunt (comparative bunter, superlative am buntesten)

  1. multi-colored; colorful; variegated
  2. (by extension) mixed, varied, heterogeneous

Declension

Derived terms

  • kunterbunt
  • quietschbunt

Further reading

  • “bunt” in Duden online

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German bunt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʉnt/

Noun

bunt m (definite singular bunten, indefinite plural bunter, definite plural buntene)

  1. bundle, bunch
    • 2016, Død i kort kjole: Braze Blade 2 by Arnfinn Forness, Chayka Förlag →ISBN [1]

References

  • “bunt” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “bunt” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German bunt

Noun

bunt m (definite singular bunten, indefinite plural buntar, definite plural buntane)

  1. bundle, bunch

References

  • “bunt” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Plautdietsch

Adjective

bunt

  1. motley, variegated, multicolored
  2. colorful
  3. gaudy

Polish

Etymology

From Middle High German bund (originally any union, the “mutiny” sense since the 17th century). Compare German Bund.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bunt/

Noun

bunt m inan (diminutive buncik)

  1. mutiny, revolt
  2. rebellion (attitude of rejecting authority)
    Synonyms: opór, protest, sprzeciw, rewolta, rebelia, powstanie, rozruchy, insurekcja

Declension

Descendants

  • Russian: бунт (bunt)

Derived terms

  • (verbs) buntować, zbuntować
  • (nouns) buntownik, buntowniczka

Related terms

  • (noun) buntowniczość
  • (adjective) buntowniczy
  • (adverb) buntowniczo

References

Further reading

  • bunt in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bunt in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

Borrowed from German Bund (federation; conspiracy).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bǔnt/

Noun

bùnt m (Cyrillic spelling бу̀нт)

  1. (colloquial) revolt, rebellion
Declension

Etymology 2

Borrowed from German Bund (alliance; waistband).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bûnt/

Noun

bȕnt m (Cyrillic spelling бу̏нт)

  1. (regional) bundle
Declension
Synonyms
  • bȕnd

References

  • “bunt” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • “bunt” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Swedish

Etymology

From Middle Low German bunt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɵnt/

Noun

bunt c

  1. bundle, bunch

Declension

References

  • bunt in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • bunt in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /bɨ̞nt/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /bɪnt/

Noun

bunt

  1. Soft mutation of punt.

Mutation


Wolof

Pronunciation

Noun

bunt

  1. door


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General American) enPR: bŭt, IPA(key): /bʌt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌt
  • Homophone: but

Etymology 1

From Middle English but, butte (goal, mark, butt of land), from Old English byt, bytt (small piece of land) and *butt (attested in diminutive Old English buttuc (end, small piece of land) > English buttock), from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (end, piece), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰnós (bottom), later thematic variant of Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn ~ *bʰudʰn-, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (deep).

Cognate with Norwegian butt (stump, block), Icelandic bútur (piece, fragment), Low German butt (blunt, clumsy). Influenced by Old French but, butte (but, mark), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Compare also Albanian bythë (buttocks), Ancient Greek πυθμήν (puthmḗn, bottom of vessel), Latin fundus (bottom) and Sanskrit बुध्न (budhná, bottom), from the same Proto-Indo-European root. Related to bottom, boot.

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (countable) The larger or thicker end of something; the blunt end, in distinction from the sharp or narrow end
    1. (Canada, US, slang) The buttocks (used as a euphemism in idiomatic expressions; less objectionable than arse/ass).
      1. (slang) The whole buttocks and pelvic region that includes one’s private parts.
      2. (slang, metonymically) Body; self.
    2. (leather trades) The thickest and stoutest part of tanned oxhides, used for soles of boots, harness, trunks.
  2. (countable) The waste end of anything
    1. (slang) A used cigarette.
    2. A piece of land left unplowed at the end of a field.
      • c. 1850-1860, Alexander Mansfield Burrill, A New Law Dictionary and Glossary
        The hay was growing upon headlands and butts in cornfields.
    3. (obsolete, West Country) Hassock.
  3. (countable, generally) An end of something, often distinguished in some way from the other end.
    1. The end of a firearm opposite to that from which a bullet is fired.
    2. (lacrosse) The plastic or rubber cap used to cover the open end of a lacrosse stick’s shaft in order to reduce injury.
    3. The portion of a half-coupling fastened to the end of a hose.
    4. The end of a connecting rod or other like piece, to which the boxing is attached by the strap, cotter, and gib.
    5. (mechanical) A joint where the ends of two objects come squarely together without scarfing or chamfering.
      Synonym: butt joint
    6. (carpentry) A kind of hinge used in hanging doors, etc., so named because it is attached to the inside edge of the door and butts against the casing, instead of on its face, like the strap hinge; also called butt hinge.
    7. (shipbuilding) The joint where two planks in a strake meet.
    8. The blunt back part of an axehead or large blade. Also called the poll.
  4. (countable) A limit; a bound; a goal; the extreme bound; the end.
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act V, Scene II, line 267.
      Here is my journey’s end, here is my butt / And very sea-mark of my utmost sail.
    1. A mark to be shot at; a target.
      • 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act I, Scene II, line 186.
        To which is fixed, as an aim or butt
      • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 37.
        The inhabitants of all cities and towns were ordered to make butts, and to keep them in repair, under a penalty of twenty shillings per month, and to exercise themselves in shooting at them on holidays.
      • The groom his fellow groom at butts defies, / And bends his bow, and levels with his eyes.
    2. (usually as “butt of (a) joke”) A person at whom ridicule, jest, or contempt is directed.
      Synonym: laughing stock
      • I played a sentence or two at my butt, which I thought very smart.
    3. The hut or shelter of the person who attends to the targets in rifle practice.
Usage notes
  • “butt” for “buttocks” is considered less vulgar than “arse/ass”, but still not as polite as saying bottom or rear end.
Translations

Verb

butt (third-person singular simple present butts, present participle butting, simple past and past participle butted)

  1. To join at the butt, end, or outward extremity; to terminate; to be bounded; to abut.
    • And Barnsdale there doth butt on Don’s well-watered ground.
Derived terms
  • butt-weld, buttweld
Related terms
See also
  • (buttocks): callipygian, callipygous, dasypygal

Etymology 2

From Middle English butten, from Anglo-Norman buter, boter (to push, butt, strike), from Frankish *bautan (to hit, beat), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to beat, push), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to beat, push, strike). Cognate with Old English bēatan (to beat). More at beat.

Verb

butt (third-person singular simple present butts, present participle butting, simple past and past participle butted)

  1. (transitive) To strike bluntly, particularly with the head.
    • 1651, Henry Wotton, A Description of the Country’s Recreations
      Two harmless lambs are butting one the other.
  2. (intransitive) To strike bluntly with the head.
Related terms
Translations

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. A push, thrust, or sudden blow, given by the head; a head butt.
  2. A thrust in fencing.
    • To prove who gave the fairer butt, / John shows the chalk on Robert’s coat.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bit, bitte, bytte, butte (leather bottle), from Old English bytt, byt and Old French boute (cask) and other etymologies on this page.

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (English units) An English measure of capacity for liquids, containing 126 wine gallons which is one-half tun; equivalent to the pipe.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, p. 205.
      Again, by 28 Hen. VIII, cap. 14, it is re-enacted that the tun of wine should contain 252 gallons, a butt of Malmsey 126 gallons, a pipe 126 gallons, a tercian or puncheon 84 gallons, a hogshead 63 gallons, a tierce 41 gallons, a barrel 31.5 gallons, a rundlet 18.5 gallons. –
  2. A wooden cask for storing wine, usually containing 126 gallons.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act II, Scene II, line 121.
      …I escap’d upon a butt of sack which the sailors heav’d o’erboard…

Related terms

Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English but, butte, botte (flounder; plaice; turbot), possibly derived from sense 1 (blunt end), meaning “blunt-headed fish.” Compare Dutch bot and the second element of English halibut.

Cognate with West Frisian bot, German Low German Butt, German Butt, Butte, Swedish butta.

Alternative forms

  • but

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (Northern England) Any of various flatfish such as sole, plaice or turbot
Derived terms
  • halibut
Translations

Etymology 5

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (dated, West Country and Ireland) A heavy two-wheeled cart.
  2. (dated, West Country and Ireland) A three-wheeled cart resembling a wheelbarrow.
Derived terms

References

  • Wright, Joseph (1898) The English Dialect Dictionary[1], volume 1, Oxford: Oxford University Press, page 463–465

Further reading

  • butt at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • butt in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German butt, bott.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʉt/

Adjective

butt (neuter singular butt, definite singular and plural butte, comparative buttere, indefinite superlative buttest, definite superlative butteste)

  1. blunt (not sharp)
  2. (vinkel) obtuse (angle between 90 and 180 degrees)

References

  • “butt” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German butt, bott.

Adjective

butt (neuter singular butt, definite singular and plural butte, comparative buttare, indefinite superlative buttast, definite superlative buttaste)

  1. blunt (not sharp)
  2. (vinkel) obtuse (angle between 90 and 180 degrees)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

butt

  1. past participle of bu

References

  • “butt” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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