bur vs burr what difference

what is difference between bur and burr

English

Alternative forms

  • burr

Etymology

From Middle English burre, from a North Germanic language, such as Danish burre (bur, burdock). See also burr. (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)

Noun

bur (plural burs)

  1. A rough, prickly husk around the seeds or fruit of some plants.
  2. Any of several plants having such husks.
  3. A rotary cutting implement having a selection of variously shaped heads.
  4. Alternative form of burr (small piece of material).

Translations

Anagrams

  • RUB, bru, rub

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse búr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːr/, [b̥uːˀɐ̯], [b̥uɐ̯ˀ]
  • Rhymes: -ur

Noun

bur n (singular definite buret, plural indefinite bure)

  1. cage

Inflection


Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse burr, from Proto-Germanic *buriz. Cognate with Old English byre (descendant, son).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʏːr/
  • Rhymes: -ʏːr

Noun

bur m (genitive singular burs, nominative plural burir)

  1. (poetic) son

Declension

The accusative plural buru also exists, but is only used in the phrase eiga börn og buru.

Derived terms

  • -bur

Istro-Romanian

Etymology

From Latin bonus, from Old Latin duenos, later duonus, from Proto-Italic *dw-enos, from Proto-Indo-European *dew- (to show favor, revere).

Adjective

bur m (feminine burĕ, neuter buro)

  1. good

Javanese

Etymology

Borrowed from Dutch boor (drill).

Noun

bur

  1. drill

Latvian

Verb

bur

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of burt
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of burt
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of burt
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of burt
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of burt
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of burt

Maay

Noun

bur

  1. flour

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse búr.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): [bʉʷːɾ]

Noun

bur n (definite singular buret, indefinite plural bur, definite plural bura or burene)

  1. cage
  2. goal (sports)

Derived terms

  • burhøne, burhøns

References

“bur” in The Bokmål Dictionary.


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse búr.

Noun

bur n (definite singular buret, indefinite plural bur, definite plural bura)

  1. cage
  2. goal (sports)

Etymology 2

Verb

bur

  1. present of bu

References

“bur” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *būraz. Cognate with Old Saxon būr, Old High German būr (German Bauer (birdcage)), Old Norse búr (Swedish bur).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːr/

Noun

būr m

  1. private chamber, room

Descendants

  • Middle English: bour, boure
    • English: bower
    • Scots: bour

Old Frisian

Noun

būr m

  1. a peasant, farmer

Inflection


Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *būraz, whence also Old English būr, Old Norse búr.

Noun

būr m

  1. peasant
  2. quarters

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle High German: būr
    • German: Bauer (birdcage)

Old Saxon

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *būraz, whence also Old English būr, Old Norse búr.

Noun

būr m

  1. neighbour
  2. inhabitant
Descendants
  • Low German: Buer, Boer

Etymology 2

Same as the masculine noun.

Noun

būr n

  1. dwelling

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse búr, from Proto-Germanic *būraz.

Noun

bur m

  1. dwelling, residence
  2. storehouse
  3. room, chamber
  4. cage

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: bur

Portuguese

Noun

bur m, f (plural bures)

  1. Archaic form of bóer.

Romagnol

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *burius, compare Italian buio.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buːr/

Noun

bur m

  1. darkness (lack of light)
    • December 2007, Nevio Spadoni, Guido Bianchi, Urazion in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 9:
      Te, che t’vid / la luš int e’ mi bur, []

      You, who sees / the light in my darkness, []

Sumerian

Romanization

bur

  1. Romanization of ???? (bur)

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish būr, from Old Norse búr, from Proto-Germanic *būraz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʉːr/
  • Rhymes: -ʉːr

Noun

bur c

  1. a cage
  2. (slang) a prison, a jail, an arrest
    att sitta i buren

    to be imprisoned

Declension


Veps

Etymology

Borrowed from Russian бу́рый (búryj).

Adjective

bur

  1. brown

Inflection

Noun

bur

  1. brown

Inflection

References

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “бурый”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /bɨːr/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /biːr/

Adjective

bur

  1. Soft mutation of pur.

Mutation


Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse búr, from Proto-Germanic *būraz.

Noun

bur n

  1. (hunting) cage for catching birds
  2. hovel

Derived terms

  • fåtabeor
  • stabur

Zaghawa

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʊɾ/

Adjective

bur

  1. little

Noun

bur

  1. one’s own child
  2. the child of a woman’s co-wife
  3. (by extension) the child of one’s brothers or cousins

References

  • Beria-English English-Beria Dictionary [provisional] ADESK, Iriba, Kobe Department, Chad


English

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /bɝ/
  • Homophones: Burr, brr
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English burre, perhaps related to Old English byrst (bristle). Cognate with Danish burre, borre (burdock, burr), Swedish borre (sea-urchin).

Noun

burr (plural burrs)

  1. A sharp, pointy object, such as a sliver or splinter.
  2. A bur; a seed pod with sharp features that stick in fur or clothing.
    Synonym: sticker
    • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, X:
      But cockle, spurge, according to their law / Might propagate their kind, with none to awe, / You’d think; a burr had been a treasure trove.
  3. A small piece of material left on an edge after a cutting operation.
  4. A thin flat piece of metal, formed from a sheet by punching; a small washer put on the end of a rivet before it is swaged down.
  5. A broad iron ring on a tilting lance just below the grip, to prevent the hand from slipping.
  6. The ear lobe.
  7. The knot at the bottom of an antler.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Onomatopoeic, influenced by bur. Compare to French bruire

Noun

burr (plural burrs)

  1. A rough humming sound.
  2. A uvular “r” sound, or (by extension) an accent characterized by this sound.
Translations

Verb

burr (third-person singular simple present burrs, present participle burring, simple past and past participle burred)

  1. (transitive) To pronounce with a uvular “r”.
  2. (intransitive) To make a rough humming sound.
    • 1950, C. S. Lewis, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Collins, 1998, Chapter 7,
      The first thing Lucy noticed as she went in was a burring sound, and the first thing she saw was a kind-looking old she-beaver sitting in the corner with a thread in her mouth working busily at her sewing machine, and it was from it that the sound came.
Translations

Etymology 3

Origin uncertain.

Noun

burr (plural burrs)

  1. (historical) A metal ring at the top of the hand-rest on a spear.

Etymology 4

From burl.

Noun

burr (plural burrs)

  1. (Britain) Alternative spelling of burl

Albanian

Alternative forms
  • bunnë (Gheg)
  • burrë (Standard, Tosk)

Noun

burr

  1. (Gheg) husband
  2. (Gheg) man

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *buriz (male offspring; son), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to bear, carry, bring). Cognate with Old English byre, Gothic ???????????????? (baur).

Noun

burr m

  1. son
    1. (when preceded by genitive of jǫrð) kenning for Thor.
      • verse 1 of the Þrýmskviða, (1936 translation by Henry Adams Bellows)
  2. poet

Declension

Synonyms

  • (son): sonr

Descendants

  • Icelandic: bur

References

  • burr in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Yatzachi Zapotec

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish burro.

Noun

burr (possessed xpurr)

  1. donkey
  2. donkey-load

Derived terms

References

  • Butler H., Inez M. (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de Yatzachi: Yatzachi el Bajo, Yatzachi el Alto, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 37)‎[6], second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 31

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