burden vs core what difference

what is difference between burden and core

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English burden, birden, burthen, birthen, byrthen, from Old English byrden, byrþen, from Proto-West Germanic *burþini, from *burþī, from Proto-Germanic *burþį̄, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to carry, bear).

Alternative forms

  • burthen (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɜːdn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɝdn/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)dən

Noun

burden (plural burdens)

  1. A heavy load.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      There were four or five men in the vault already, and I could hear more coming down the passage, and guessed from their heavy footsteps that they were carrying burdens.
  2. A responsibility, onus.
  3. A cause of worry; that which is grievous, wearisome, or oppressive.
    • c. 1710-1730, Jonathan Swift, The Dean’s Complaint Translated and Answered
      Deaf, giddy, helpless, left alone, / To all my friends a burden grown.
  4. The capacity of a vessel, or the weight of cargo that she will carry.
    a ship of a hundred tons burden
  5. (mining) The tops or heads of stream-work which lie over the stream of tin.
  6. (metalworking) The proportion of ore and flux to fuel, in the charge of a blast furnace.
  7. A fixed quantity of certain commodities.
  8. (obsolete, rare) A birth.
    [] that bore thee at a burden two fair sons.
  9. (medicine) The total amount of toxins, parasites, cancer cells, plaque or similar present in an organism.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

burden (third-person singular simple present burdens, present participle burdening, simple past and past participle burdened)

  1. (transitive) To encumber with a literal or figurative burden.
  2. (transitive) To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable).
Derived terms
  • burden basket
  • burdensome
  • beast of burden
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French bordon. See bourdon.

Noun

burden (plural burdens)

  1. (music) A phrase or theme that recurs at the end of each verse in a folk song or ballad.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 1 scene 2
      Foot it featly here and there; / And, sweet sprites, the burden bear.
    • 1846, Edgar Allan Poe, The Philosophy of Composition
      As commonly used, the refrain, or burden, not only is limited to lyric verse, but depends for its impression upon the force of monotone – both in sound and thought.
  2. The drone of a bagpipe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ruddiman to this entry?)
  3. Theme, core idea.

References

Anagrams

  • bunder, burned, unbred

Middle English

Etymology 1

Adjective

burden

  1. Alternative form of borden

Etymology 2

From burde +‎ -en (plural ending)

Noun

burden

  1. plural of burde

West Frisian

Noun

burden

  1. plural of burd


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɔː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ko(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /koə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophone: corps; caw (non-rhotic accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English core, kore, coor (apple-core, pith), of uncertain origin. Possibly of native English origin (compare Old English corn (seed”, also “grain), or perhaps from Old French cuer (heart), from Latin cor (heart); or from Old French cors (body), from Latin corpus (body). Compare also Middle English colk, coke, coll (the heart or centre of an apple or onion, core), Dutch kern (core), German Kern (core). See also heart, corpse.

Noun

core (countable and uncountable, plural cores)

  1. The central part of a fruit, containing the kernels or seeds.
  2. The heart or inner part of a physical thing.
  3. The center or inner part of a space or area.
    • the core of the square
  4. The most important part of a thing; the essence.
  5. (botany) Used to designate the main and most diverse monophyletic group within a clade or taxonomic group.
  6. (engineering) The portion of a mold that creates an internal cavity within a casting or that makes a hole in or through a casting.
  7. The bony process which forms the central axis of the horns in many animals.
  8. (computing, informal, historical) Ellipsis of core memory; magnetic data storage.
  9. (computer hardware) An individual computer processor, in the sense when several processors (called cores or CPU cores) are plugged together in one single integrated circuit to work as one (called a multi-core processor).
  10. (engineering) The material between surface materials in a structured composite sandwich material.
  11. (engineering, nuclear physics) The inner part of a nuclear reactor, in which the nuclear reaction takes place.
  12. (military) The central fissile portion of a fission weapon.
  13. A piece of ferromagnetic material (e.g., soft iron), inside the windings of an electromagnet, that channels the magnetic field.
  14. A disorder of sheep caused by worms in the liver.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  15. A cylindrical sample of rock or other materials obtained by core drilling.
  16. (medicine) A tiny sample of organic material obtained by means of a fine-needle biopsy.
  17. (biochemistry) The central part of a protein’s structure, consisting mostly of hydrophobic amino acids.
  18. (game theory) The set of feasible allocations that cannot be improved upon by a subset (a coalition) of the economy’s agents.
  19. (printing) A hollow cylindrical piece of cardboard around which a web of paper or plastic is wound.
  20. (physics) An atomic nucleus plus inner electrons (i.e., an atom, except for its valence electrons).

Synonyms

  • (The most important part of a thing): crux, gist; See also Thesaurus:gist
Hyponyms
  • (central part of fruit): apple core
  • (inner part of a physical thing): bifacial core
  • (cylindrical sample): drill core
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Translingual: core eudicots, core Malvales
Translations

Adjective

core (not comparable)

  1. Forming the most important or essential part.

Verb

core (third-person singular simple present cores, present participle coring, simple past and past participle cored)

  1. To remove the core of an apple or other fruit.
  2. To extract a sample with a drill.
Derived terms
  • corer
  • uncore
  • uncored

Translations

Etymology 2

See corps

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (obsolete) A body of individuals; an assemblage.
    • He was in a core of people.
Translations

Etymology 3

See chore

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. A miner’s underground working time or shift.
Translations

Etymology 4

From Hebrew כֹּר

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (historical units of measure) Alternative form of cor: a former Hebrew and Phoenician unit of volume.

Etymology 5

Possibly an acronym for cash on return

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. (automotive, machinery, aviation, marine) A deposit paid by the purchaser of a rebuilt part, to be refunded on return of a used, rebuildable part, or the returned rebuildable part itself.

References

Anagrams

  • ROCE, cero, cero-, creo, ocre

Istriot

Alternative forms

  • cor

Etymology

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun

core

  1. heart
    • Ti son la manduleîna del mio core;

      You are the almond of my heart;

Italian

Noun

core (core)

  1. Archaic form of cuore.

Anagrams

  • c’ero, cero, cerò, creo, creò, ocre, reco, recò

Latin

Noun

core

  1. ablative singular of coris

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • coor, kore

Etymology

Unknown; derivation from either Old French cuer (heart) or cors (body) has been suggested, though both possibilities pose serious problems.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔːr(ə)/

Noun

core (plural cores)

  1. core (centre of a fruit)
  2. (rare, by extension) The middle of something.

Descendants

  • English: core

References

  • “cōre, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “Core, sb.1”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume II (C), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 989, column 3.

Neapolitan

Etymology

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun

core m (plural core)

  1. heart

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English core.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.ɾi/, /ˈkɔɹ/

Noun

core m (plural cores)

  1. (computer architecture) core (independent unit in a processor with several such units)
    Synonym: núcleo

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɔ.ɾi/

Verb

core

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of corar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of corar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of corar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of corar

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