burden vs loading what difference

what is difference between burden and loading

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English burden, birden, burthen, birthen, byrthen, from Old English byrden, byrþen, from Proto-West Germanic *burþini, from *burþī, from Proto-Germanic *burþį̄, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to carry, bear).

Alternative forms

  • burthen (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɜːdn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbɝdn/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)dən

Noun

burden (plural burdens)

  1. A heavy load.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      There were four or five men in the vault already, and I could hear more coming down the passage, and guessed from their heavy footsteps that they were carrying burdens.
  2. A responsibility, onus.
  3. A cause of worry; that which is grievous, wearisome, or oppressive.
    • c. 1710-1730, Jonathan Swift, The Dean’s Complaint Translated and Answered
      Deaf, giddy, helpless, left alone, / To all my friends a burden grown.
  4. The capacity of a vessel, or the weight of cargo that she will carry.
    a ship of a hundred tons burden
  5. (mining) The tops or heads of stream-work which lie over the stream of tin.
  6. (metalworking) The proportion of ore and flux to fuel, in the charge of a blast furnace.
  7. A fixed quantity of certain commodities.
  8. (obsolete, rare) A birth.
    [] that bore thee at a burden two fair sons.
  9. (medicine) The total amount of toxins, parasites, cancer cells, plaque or similar present in an organism.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

burden (third-person singular simple present burdens, present participle burdening, simple past and past participle burdened)

  1. (transitive) To encumber with a literal or figurative burden.
  2. (transitive) To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable).
Derived terms
  • burden basket
  • burdensome
  • beast of burden
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French bordon. See bourdon.

Noun

burden (plural burdens)

  1. (music) A phrase or theme that recurs at the end of each verse in a folk song or ballad.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 1 scene 2
      Foot it featly here and there; / And, sweet sprites, the burden bear.
    • 1846, Edgar Allan Poe, The Philosophy of Composition
      As commonly used, the refrain, or burden, not only is limited to lyric verse, but depends for its impression upon the force of monotone – both in sound and thought.
  2. The drone of a bagpipe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ruddiman to this entry?)
  3. Theme, core idea.

References

Anagrams

  • bunder, burned, unbred

Middle English

Etymology 1

Adjective

burden

  1. Alternative form of borden

Etymology 2

From burde +‎ -en (plural ending)

Noun

burden

  1. plural of burde

West Frisian

Noun

burden

  1. plural of burd


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈləʊ.dɪŋ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈloʊ.diŋ/
  • Hyphenation: loa‧ding

Noun

loading (countable and uncountable, plural loadings)

  1. (countable, uncountable) The process by which something is loaded.
  2. (countable) A load, especially in the engineering and electrical engineering senses of force exerted, or electrical current or power supplied.
  3. (Australia, industrial relations, countable) A hourly pay rate given to a casual employee which is higher than the equivalent full-time or part-time employee’s rate, usually paid to compensate for a lack of benefits such as sick leave or annual leave.
  4. A weighting or bias.
    • 2013, H. J. Eysenck, Experiments in Personality (volume 2, page 238)
      We may note with some surprise that the hysteria scale has a positive loading on this factor, i.e. is situated towards the normal rather than the neurotic end.

Derived terms

Hyponyms

Translations

Verb

loading

  1. present participle of load

Derived terms

  • command-loading

Anagrams

  • Galindo, digonal

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