burlesque vs lampoon what difference

what is difference between burlesque and lampoon

English

Alternative forms

  • burlesk (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from French burlesque, from Italian burlesco (parodic).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bə(ɹ)ˈlɛsk/

Adjective

burlesque (comparative more burlesque, superlative most burlesque)

  1. (dated) Parodical; parodic
    • It is a dispute among the critics, whether burlesque poetry runs best in heroic verse, like that of the Dispensary, or in doggerel, like that of Hudibras.

Coordinate terms

  • vaudevillian

Derived terms

  • burlesquely

Translations

Noun

burlesque (countable and uncountable, plural burlesques)

  1. A derisive art form that mocks by imitation; a parody.
    Synonyms: lampoon, travesty
    • 1683, John Dryden, The Art of Poetry
  2. A variety adult entertainment show, usually including titillation such as striptease, most common from the 1880s to the 1930s.
  3. A ludicrous imitation; a caricature; a travesty; a gross perversion.
    Synonyms: imitation, caricature
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France

Coordinate terms

  • vaudeville

Translations

Verb

burlesque (third-person singular simple present burlesques, present participle burlesquing, simple past and past participle burlesqued)

  1. To make a burlesque parody of.
  2. To ridicule, or to make ludicrous by grotesque representation in action or in language.
    • 1678, Edward Stillingfleet, A Sermon preached on the Fast-Day, November 13, 1678
      They burlesqued the prophet Jeremiah’s words, and turned the expression he used into ridicule.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian burlesco (parodic).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /byʁ.lɛsk/

Adjective

burlesque (plural burlesques)

  1. burlesque; parodic; parodical

Noun

burlesque m (plural burlesques)

  1. burlesque; parody.

Coordinate terms

  • vaudeville

Descendants

  • English: burlesque

Further reading

  • “burlesque” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From French lampon (satire, mockery, ridicule), built on French lampons (let us drink — a popular refrain for scurrilous songs), from lamper (to quaff, to swig).

Littré quotes a satirical song mocking King Jacques II Stuart, fleeing Dublin, in 1691, and returning to France under the escort of Lauzun:

Prenez soin de ma couronne, J’aurai soin de ma personne ;
(“Take care of my crown, I will take care of my person”)
Lampons ! lampons !

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /læmˈpuːn/

Noun

lampoon (plural lampoons)

  1. A written attack or other work ridiculing a person, group, or institution.

Derived terms

  • lampoonery

Translations

Verb

lampoon (third-person singular simple present lampoons, present participle lampooning, simple past and past participle lampooned)

  1. To satirize or poke fun at.

Synonyms

  • Thesaurus:defame

Derived terms

  • lampooner

Translations

References

Further reading

  • lampoon in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • lampoon in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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