burlesque vs takeoff what difference

what is difference between burlesque and takeoff

English

Alternative forms

  • burlesk (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from French burlesque, from Italian burlesco (parodic).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bə(ɹ)ˈlɛsk/

Adjective

burlesque (comparative more burlesque, superlative most burlesque)

  1. (dated) Parodical; parodic
    • It is a dispute among the critics, whether burlesque poetry runs best in heroic verse, like that of the Dispensary, or in doggerel, like that of Hudibras.

Coordinate terms

  • vaudevillian

Derived terms

  • burlesquely

Translations

Noun

burlesque (countable and uncountable, plural burlesques)

  1. A derisive art form that mocks by imitation; a parody.
    Synonyms: lampoon, travesty
    • 1683, John Dryden, The Art of Poetry
  2. A variety adult entertainment show, usually including titillation such as striptease, most common from the 1880s to the 1930s.
  3. A ludicrous imitation; a caricature; a travesty; a gross perversion.
    Synonyms: imitation, caricature
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France

Coordinate terms

  • vaudeville

Translations

Verb

burlesque (third-person singular simple present burlesques, present participle burlesquing, simple past and past participle burlesqued)

  1. To make a burlesque parody of.
  2. To ridicule, or to make ludicrous by grotesque representation in action or in language.
    • 1678, Edward Stillingfleet, A Sermon preached on the Fast-Day, November 13, 1678
      They burlesqued the prophet Jeremiah’s words, and turned the expression he used into ridicule.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian burlesco (parodic).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /byʁ.lɛsk/

Adjective

burlesque (plural burlesques)

  1. burlesque; parodic; parodical

Noun

burlesque m (plural burlesques)

  1. burlesque; parody.

Coordinate terms

  • vaudeville

Descendants

  • English: burlesque

Further reading

  • “burlesque” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Alternative forms

  • take-off

Etymology

From the verb phrase take off.

Noun

takeoff (countable and uncountable, plural takeoffs)

  1. The rising or ascent of an aircraft or rocket into flight.
    The flight was smooth, but the takeoff was a little rough.
  2. A parody or lampoon of someone or something.
    Weird Al’s song “Lasagna” is a takeoff on the popular song “La Bamba”.
    • 1897, Edward Bellamy, Equality, ch. 23
      I came across a little pamphlet of the period, yellow and almost undecipherable, which, on examination, I found to be a rather amusing skit or satirical take-off on the profit system.
  3. A quantification, especially of building materials.
    I’ll give you an estimate after I do the quantity takeoffs for the trusses and structural steel.
  4. (printing, Britain, historical) The removal of sheets from the press.
  5. The spot from which one takes off; specifically, the place from which a jumper rises in leaping.
    • Encyclopaedia of Sport
      The take-off should be selected with great care, and a pit of large dimensions provided on the landing side.

Translations

Antonyms

  • landing

See also

  • take off

Anagrams

  • offtake

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