burn vs fire what difference

what is difference between burn and fire

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɝn/, enPR: bûrn
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɜːn/, enPR: bûn
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)n
  • Homophone: Bern

Etymology 1

From Middle English bernen, birnen, from Old English birnan (to burn), metathesis from Proto-West Germanic *brinnan, from Proto-Germanic *brinnaną (to burn), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenw- (compare Middle Irish brennim (drink up), bruinnim (bubble up)), present stem from *bʰrewh₁-, *bʰru- (compare Middle Irish bréo (flame), Albanian burth (Cyclamen hederifolium, mouth burning), Sanskrit भुरति (bhurati, moves quickly, twitches, fidgets)). More at brew.

Noun

burn (countable and uncountable, plural burns)

  1. A physical injury caused by heat, cold, electricity, radiation or caustic chemicals.
    She had second-degree burns from falling in the bonfire.
  2. A sensation resembling such an injury.
    chili burn from eating hot peppers
  3. The act of burning something with fire.
    They’re doing a controlled burn of the fields.
  4. (slang) An intense non-physical sting, as left by shame or an effective insult.
  5. (slang) An effective insult, often in the expression sick burn (excellent or badass insult).
  6. Physical sensation in the muscles following strenuous exercise, caused by build-up of lactic acid.
    One and, two and, keep moving; feel the burn!
  7. (uncountable, Britain, chiefly prison slang) Tobacco.
  8. (computing) The writing of data to a permanent storage medium like a compact disc or a ROM chip.
    • 2003, Maria Langer, Mac OS X 10.2 Advanced (page 248)
      Allow additional burns enables you to create a multisession CD, which can be used again to write more data.
  9. The operation or result of burning or baking, as in brickmaking.
    They have a good burn.
  10. (uncountable) A disease in vegetables; brand.
  11. (aerospace) The firing of a spacecraft’s rockets in order to change its course.
    • 2004, David Baker, Jane’s Space Directory (page 529)
      On 4 March 1999, the MCO performed its second course correction manoeuvre with a burn involving its four thrusters []
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

burn (third-person singular simple present burns, present participle burning, simple past and past participle burned or (mostly Commonwealth) burnt)

  1. (transitive) To cause to be consumed by fire.
  2. (intransitive) To be consumed by fire, or in flames.
  3. (transitive) To overheat so as to make unusable.
  4. (intransitive) To become overheated to the point of being unusable.
  5. (transitive) To make or produce by the application of fire or burning heat.
  6. (transitive) To injure (a person or animal) with heat or chemicals that produce similar damage.
  7. (transitive, surgery) To cauterize.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To sunburn.
  9. (transitive) To consume, injure, or change the condition of, as if by action of fire or heat; to affect as fire or heat does.
    • This dry sorrow burns up all my tears.
    • 1965, Amplified Bible, James 4:2
      You are jealous and covet [what others have] and your desires go unfulfilled; [so] you become murderers. [To hate is to murder as far as your hearts are concerned.] You burn with envy and anger and are not able to obtain [the gratification, the contentment, and the happiness that you seek], so you fight and war. You do not have, because you do not ask.
  10. (intransitive) To be hot, e.g. due to embarrassment.
  11. (chemistry, transitive) To cause to combine with oxygen or other active agent, with evolution of heat; to consume; to oxidize.
  12. (chemistry, dated) To combine energetically, with evolution of heat.
  13. (transitive, computing) To write data to a permanent storage medium like a compact disc or a ROM chip.
  14. (transitive, slang) To betray.
  15. (transitive, slang) To insult or defeat.
  16. (transitive) To waste (time); to waste money or other resources.
  17. In certain games, to approach near to a concealed object which is sought.
  18. (intransitive, curling) To accidentally touch a moving stone.
  19. (transitive, card games) In pontoon, to swap a pair of cards for another pair, or to deal a dead card.
  20. (photography) To increase the exposure for certain areas of a print in order to make them lighter (compare dodge).
  21. (intransitive, physics, of an element) To be converted to another element in a nuclear fusion reaction, especially in a star
  22. (intransitive, slang, card games, gambling) To discard.
  23. (transitive, slang) To shoot someone with a firearm.
  24. (transitive, espionage) To compromise (an agent’s cover story).
    • 2011, Thomas H. Cook, Night Secrets
      He had already burned his cover with Mrs. Phillips, and it was not a mistake he intended to make again.
    • 2013, Vanessa Kier, Vengeance: The SSU Book 1
      Eventually they’d report back to Ryker, and he still didn’t know if Ryker had personally burned his cover and sent assassins after him, or if the SSU had a mole. Until he knew for certain, he had to play this safe.
  25. (transitive, espionage) To blackmail.
    • 1979, John le Carré, Smiley’s People
      How does Leipzig burn him precisely?” Enderby insisted. “What’s the pressure? Dirty pix—well, okay. Karla’s a puritan, so’s Kirov. But I mean, Christ, this isn’t the fifties, is it? []
Derived terms
Related terms
  • combust
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English burn, bourne, from Old English burne, burna (spring, fountain), Proto-West Germanic *brunnō, from Proto-Germanic *brunnô, *brunō. Cognate with West Frisian boarne, Dutch bron, German Brunnen; also Albanian burim (spring, fountain), Ancient Greek φρέαρ (phréar, well, reservoir), Old Armenian աղբիւր (ałbiwr, fount). Doublet of bourn. More at brew.

Noun

burn (plural burns)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland) A stream.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      He may pitch on some tuft of lilacs over a burn, and smoke innumerable pipes to the tune of the water on the stones.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 105:
      When it was too heavy rain the burn ran very high and wide and ye could never jump it.
Derived terms
  • Burnmouth
Related terms
  • bourn
Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “burn”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4

Nyunga

Noun

burn

  1. wood

References

  • 1886, C. F. Armstrong (Edward Micklethwaite Curr, ed.), The Australian Race: Its Origins, Languages, Customs, Place of Landing in Australia, and the routes by which it spread itself over that continent

Scots

Etymology

Middle English bourne, from Old English burne, burna (spring, fountain).

Cognate with West Frisian boarne, Dutch bron, German Brunnen; also Albanian burim (spring, fountain), Ancient Greek φρέαρ (phréar, well, reservoir), Old Armenian աղբիւր (ałbiwr, fount).

Noun

burn (plural burns)

  1. A small river.

References

“burn” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfaɪə(ɹ)/
  • (Upper RP Triphthong Smoothing) IPA(key): /ˈfaə(ɹ)/, /ˈfaː(ɹ)/, /ˈfɑə(ɹ)/, /ˈfɑəː(ɹ)/
  • (General American) enPR: fīʹər, fīr, IPA(key): /ˈfaɪɚ/, [ˈfaɪɚ]
  • (Southern American English, Appalachia) IPA(key): [ˈfäːɚ]
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ˈfɑeə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English fyr, from Old English fȳr (fire), from Proto-West Germanic *fuir, from *fuïr, a regularised form of Proto-Germanic *fōr (fire) (compare Saterland Frisian Fjuur, West Frisian fjoer, Dutch vuur, Low German Füer, German Feuer, Danish fyr), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *péh₂wr̥.

Compare Hittite ???????????? (paḫḫur), Umbrian pir, Tocharian A/B por/puwar, Czech pýř (hot ashes), Ancient Greek πῦρ (pûr, fire), and Armenian հուր (hur, fire)). This was an inanimate noun whose animate counterpart was Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥gʷnis (see ignite). Cognate to pyre.

Alternative forms

  • fier (archaic)

Noun

fire (countable and uncountable, plural fires)

  1. (uncountable) A (usually self-sustaining) chemical reaction involving the bonding of oxygen with carbon or other fuel, with the production of heat and the presence of flame or smouldering.
  2. (countable) An instance of this chemical reaction, especially when intentionally created and maintained in a specific location to a useful end (such as a campfire or a hearth fire).
  3. (countable) The occurrence, often accidental, of fire in a certain place, causing damage and danger.
  4. (uncountable, alchemy, philosophy) The aforementioned chemical reaction of burning, considered one of the Classical elements or basic elements of alchemy.
  5. (countable, Britain) A heater or stove used in place of a real fire (such as an electric fire).
  6. (countable) The elements necessary to start a fire.
  7. (uncountable) The bullets or other projectiles fired from a gun or other ranged weapon.
  8. (astronautics) An instance of firing one or more rocket engines.
  9. Strength of passion, whether love or hate.
    • 1687, Francis Atterbury, An Answer to some Considerations, the Spirit of Martin Luther and the Original of the Reformation
      He had fire in his temper.
  10. Liveliness of imagination or fancy; intellectual and moral enthusiasm.
  11. Splendour; brilliancy; lustre; hence, a star.
  12. A severe trial; anything inflaming or provoking.
  13. Red coloration in a piece of opal.
Synonyms
  • blaze
  • conflagration
  • inferno
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ファイヤー (faiyā)
  • Sranan Tongo: faya
Translations

See fire/translations § Noun.

Etymology 2

From Middle English firen, fyren, furen, from Old English fȳrian (to make a fire), from the noun (see above). Cognate with Old Frisian fioria (to light a fire), Saterland Frisian fjuurje (to fire), Middle Dutch vûren, vueren, vieren (to set fire), Dutch vuren (to fire, shoot), Old High German fiuren (to ignite, set on fire), German feuern (to fire).

Verb

fire (third-person singular simple present fires, present participle firing, simple past and past participle fired)

  1. (transitive) To set (something, often a building) on fire.
    • 1907, Jack London, The Iron Heel
      It was long a question of debate, whether the burning of the South Side ghetto was accidental, or whether it was done by the Mercenaries; but it is definitely settled now that the ghetto was fired by the Mercenaries under orders from their chiefs.
  2. (transitive) To heat as with fire, but without setting on fire, as ceramic, metal objects, etc.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills, [] a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
  3. (transitive) To drive away by setting a fire.
  4. (transitive) To terminate the employment contract of (an employee), especially for cause (such as misconduct or poor performance).
    Antonym: hire
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p.226:
      The first, obvious choice was hysterical and fantastic Blanche – had there not been her timidity, her fear of being ‘fired [].
  5. (transitive) To shoot (a gun, rocket/missile, or analogous device).
  6. (astronautics) To operate a rocket engine to produce thrust.
  7. (transitive, mining) To set off an explosive in a mine.
  8. (intransitive) To shoot a gun, cannon, or similar weapon.
    Synonyms: open fire, shoot
  9. (transitive, sports) To shoot; to attempt to score a goal.
  10. (intransitive, physiology) To cause an action potential in a cell.
  11. (transitive) To forcibly direct (something).
  12. (transitive, intransitive, computer sciences, software engineering) To initiate an event (by means of an event handler).
  13. To inflame; to irritate, as the passions.
    • Love had fired my mind.
  14. To animate; to give life or spirit to.
  15. To feed or serve the fire of.
  16. (transitive) To light up as if by fire; to illuminate.
  17. (transitive, farriery) To cauterize.
  18. (intransitive, dated) To catch fire; to be kindled.
  19. (intransitive, dated) To be irritated or inflamed with passion.
Synonyms
  • (set on fire): See set on fire
  • (transitive, shoot): let off, loose (archery), shoot
  • (terminate the employment of): dehire, dismiss, give one’s cards, give the boot, give the elbow, give the old heave-ho, let go, make redundant, sack, terminate, throw out, unhire; See also Thesaurus:lay off.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Alternative forms

  • fye (nonstandard, Internet slang)

Adjective

fire (not comparable)

  1. (slang) Amazing; excellent.
Translations

Further reading

  • fire on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Fire in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • -fier, Fier, Frie, fier, refi, reif, rief, rife

Asturian

Verb

fire

  1. third-person singular present indicative of firir

Crimean Tatar

Noun

fire

  1. shrinkage, loss
  2. scrap

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres (four).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiːrə/, [ˈfiːɐ]

Numeral

fire

  1. four
Usage notes

In compounds: fir-.

Etymology 2

From Middle Low German fīren, from French virer (bear, veer).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiːrə/, [ˈfiːɐ]

Verb

fire (imperative fir, infinitive at fire, present tense firer, past tense firede, perfect tense har firet)

  1. to lower something fixed to a rope or something similar
    • 1871, Jens Andreas Friis, Lappisk Mythologi, page 138
      Saa gik han hen og firede Stenen og Vidietouget ned i Hullet.

      Then he went [to the hole] and lowered the rock and the wicker rope down into the hole.
    • 2014, Teddy Vork, Diget, Tellerup A/S →ISBN
      Han satte sig på knæ, famlede sig frem til tovet og vendte sig rundt så han havde ryggen til hullet, drejede overkroppen bagud, firede faklen ned i hullet.

      He kneeled, fumbled his way to the rope and turned around, such that his back was to the hole, twisted his torso backwards, lowered the torch into the hole.
Conjugation

Italian

Etymology

From Latin fīerī (to become, be), present active infinitive of fīō. Compare Romanian fi.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.re/
  • Hyphenation: fì‧re

Verb

fìre (third-person only, third-person singular present fìa, no third-person singular past historic, no past participle)

  1. (northern Italy, obsolete) to be
    Synonym: essere

Usage notes

  • The only forms attested outside of ancient Northern Italian literature are the future fia (third-person singular) and fiano (third-person plural).

References

  • fire in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

  • ferì, refi

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Danish fire, Old Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from *kʷetwṓr, the neuter form of Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfiːɾə/

Numeral

fire

  1. four
Derived terms
Related terms
  • fjerde (ordinal)

Etymology 2

From French virer, via Middle Low German firen

Verb

fire (imperative fir, present tense firer, passive fires, simple past fira or firet or firte, past participle fira or firet or firt, present participle firende)

  1. to slacken, ease
  2. to lower (a flag)

References

  • “fire” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse fjórir, via Danish fire.

Etymology 1

From Danish fire, Old Norse fjórir, from Proto-Germanic *fedwōr, from *kʷetwṓr, the neuter form of Proto-Indo-European *kʷetwóres.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈfiːɾə/

Numeral

fire

  1. four
Derived terms
Related terms
  • fjerde (ordinal)

Etymology 2

From French virer, via Middle Low German firen.

Verb

fire

  1. to slacken, ease
  2. to lower (e.g. a flag)

References

  • “fire” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology 1

Noun

fire n

  1. plural of fir

Etymology 2

From fi +‎ -re.

Noun

fire f (plural firi)

  1. essence, substance, nature
    Synonym: natură
  2. character, temper, disposition
    Synonyms: caracter, temperament
  3. mind
    Synonym: minte
Declension
Related terms

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Greek Φύρα (Fýra)

Noun

fire (definite accusative fireyi, plural fireler)

  1. wastage
  2. outage
  3. shrinkage, loss, loss in weight, decrease
  4. turnover
  5. ullage
  6. leakage
  7. waste, tret, deficiency

Declension

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