burst vs explosion what difference

what is difference between burst and explosion

English

Etymology

From Middle English bersten, from Old English berstan, from Proto-Germanic *brestaną (compare West Frisian boarste, Dutch barsten, Swedish brista), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰres- (to burst, break, crack, split, separate) (compare Irish bris (to break)), enlargement of *bʰreHi- (to snip, split). More at brine. Also cognate to debris.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /bɝst/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɜːst/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)st

Verb

burst (third-person singular simple present bursts, present participle bursting, simple past burst or (archaic) brast or (nonstandard) bursted, past participle burst or (rare) bursten or (nonstandard) bursted)

  1. (intransitive) To break from internal pressure.
  2. (transitive) To cause to break from internal pressure.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To cause to break by any means.
    • He burst his lance against the sand below.
  4. (transitive) To separate (printer paper) at perforation lines.
  5. (intransitive) To enter or exit hurriedly and unexpectedly.
    • 1913, Mariano Azuela, The Underdogs, translated by E. MunguÍa, Jr.
      Like hungry dogs who have sniffed their meat, the mob bursts in, trampling down the women who sought to bar the entrance with their bodies.
  6. (intransitive) To erupt; to change state suddenly as if bursting.
    The flowers burst into bloom on the first day of spring.
  7. (transitive) To produce as an effect of bursting.
    to burst a hole through the wall
    • 1856, Eleanor Marx-Aveling (translator), Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter X
      He entered Maromme shouting for the people of the inn, burst open the door with a thrust of his shoulder, made for a sack of oats, emptied a bottle of sweet cider into the manger, and again mounted his nag, whose feet struck fire as it dashed along.
  8. (transitive) To interrupt suddenly in a violent or explosive manner; to shatter.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:burst.

Coordinate terms

  • split, crack

Derived terms

Related terms

  • bust

Translations

Noun

burst (plural bursts)

  1. An act or instance of bursting.
    The bursts of the bombs could be heard miles away.
  2. A sudden, often intense, expression, manifestation or display.
    Synonym: spurt
    • 1860/1861, Charles Dickens, Great Expectations
      “It’s my wedding-day,” cried Biddy, in a burst of happiness, “and I am married to Joe!”
  3. A series of shots fired from an automatic firearm.
  4. (military) The explosion of a bomb or missile.
    a ground burst; a surface burst
  5. (archaic) A drinking spree.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Strub, strub, sturb, trubs

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse burst, from Proto-Germanic *burstiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʏr̥st/
  • Rhymes: -ʏr̥st

Noun

burst f (genitive singular burstar, nominative plural burstir)

  1. bristle
  2. gable

Declension

Related terms

  • bursti
  • bursta

Old High German

Alternative forms

  • borst

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *burstiz.

Noun

burst n

  1. bristle

Descendants

  • Middle High German: burst, borst, burste, borste
    • Central Franconian:
      Hunsrik: Berst
      Luxembourgish: Buuscht, Biischt
    • East Central German:
      Erzgebirgisch: bèrschd
    • German: Borste, Bürste

Old Norse

Etymology

from Proto-Germanic *burstiz

Noun

burst f

  1. bristle

Declension

References

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Altnordisches Wörterbuch, (4. Auflage) 2014


English

Etymology

From French explosion, from Latin explōsiōnis, genitive form of explōsio, from explōdo (I drive out by clapping), from ex- and plōdo (I clap or strike). For more information see explode#Etymology.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspləʊ.ʒən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɛkˈsploʊ.ʒən/

Noun

explosion (countable and uncountable, plural explosions)

  1. A violent release of energy (sometimes mechanical, nuclear, or chemical.)
  2. A bursting due to pressure.
  3. The sound of an explosion.
  4. A sudden uncontrolled increase.
  5. A sudden outburst.

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • implosion

Derived terms

  • Cambrian explosion
  • implosion

Related terms

  • explode
  • explosive
  • principle of explosion

Translations

See also

  • explosion on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

From Latin explosiō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.splo.zjɔ̃/

Noun

explosion f (plural explosions)

  1. explosion

Derived terms

  • explosion cambrienne
  • moteur à explosion

Related terms

  • exploser

Further reading

  • “explosion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Swedish

Etymology

From Latin explosiō, attested from 1770.

Noun

explosion c

  1. explosion
    Synonym: sprängning
    Antonym: implosion

Inflection

Derived terms

  • explosionsartad
  • explosionsmotor
  • granatexplosion

Related terms

  • explodera
  • explosiv

References


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