bury vs inter what difference

what is difference between bury and inter

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: bĕr’ē, bû’rē; IPA(key): /ˈbɛɹ.i/, /ˈbɜː.ɹi/
    • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ˈbʌ.ɹi/ (also used by some outside Scotland)
    • (Middlesbrough and Lancashire) IPA(key): /ˈbʊ.ɹi/
  • (US) enPR: bĕr’ē, bûr’ē; IPA(key): /ˈbɛɹ.i/, /ˈbɝ.i/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɹi
  • Homophone: berry

Etymology 1

Middle English burien, berien, from Old English byrġan, from Proto-Germanic *burgijaną (to keep safe), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ- (to defend, protect). Cognate with Icelandic byrgja (to cover, shut; to hold in); West Frisian bergje (to keep), German bergen (to save/rescue something); also Albanian mburojë (shield), Eastern Lithuanian bir̃ginti (to save, spare), Russian бере́чь (beréčʹ, to spare), Ossetian ӕмбӕрзын (æmbærzyn, to cover).

The spelling with ⟨u⟩ represents the pronunciation of the West Midland and Southern dialects, while the Modern English pronunciation with /ɛ/ is from the Kentish dialects.

Verb

bury (third-person singular simple present buries, present participle burying, simple past and past participle buried)

  1. (transitive) To ritualistically inter in a grave or tomb.
  2. (transitive) To place in the ground.
  3. (transitive, often figuratively) To hide or conceal as if by covering with earth or another substance.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To suppress and hide away in one’s mind.
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To put an end to; to abandon.
  6. (transitive, figuratively) To score a goal.
  7. (transitive, figuratively, slang) To kill or murder.
  8. To render imperceptible by other, more prominent stimuli; drown out.
  9. (transitive, figuratively, humorous) To outlive.
    Grandpa’s still in excellent health. He’ll bury us all!
Derived terms
Related terms
  • burian
Translations

Noun

bury (plural buries)

  1. (obsolete) A burrow.

References

Etymology 2

See borough.

Noun

bury (plural buries)

  1. A borough; a manor
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. 5, “Twelfth Century”
      Indisputable, though very dim to modern vision, rests on its hill-slope that same Bury, Stow, or Town of St. Edmund; already a considerable place, not without traffic

Anagrams

  • Ruby, ruby

Polish

Etymology

A post-Mongol invasion Turkic borrowing as Ukrainian бу́рий (búryj) and Russian бу́рый (búryj), which latter see.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbu.rɨ/

Adjective

bury

  1. brownish dark grey
  2. dark grey with spots

Declension

Related terms

  • (prefix) buro-
  • (adverb) buro
  • (adjective) burawy
  • (nouns) burek, burość

Noun

bury m anim

  1. (regional) bear (ursid)

Further reading

  • bury in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots

Etymology

From English bury. Replacing native form bery.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌri/

Verb

bury (third-person singular present buries, present participle buryin, past buriet, past participle buriet)

  1. (transitive) to bury


English

Alternative forms

  • enter (obsolete, pre-Latinised spelling)

Etymology

From Middle English enteren, borrowed from Old French enterrer, enterer, from Vulgar Latin *interrāre (to put in earth).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪnˈtɜː(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈtɝ/

Verb

inter (third-person singular simple present inters, present participle interring, simple past and past participle interred)

  1. To bury in a grave.
    Synonyms: bury, inearth, entomb, inhume
    Antonyms: dig up, disentomb, disinter, exhume, unearth
  2. To confine, as in a prison.

Usage notes

  • The spellings intering (for interring) and intered (for interred) exist as well, but are much less common.

Derived terms

  • reinter

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • -retin, -retin-, Terni, Tiner, inert, n-tier, niter, nitre, riten., terin, trine

Esperanto

Etymology

From Latin inter.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈinter/
  • Hyphenation: in‧ter
  • Rhymes: -inter
  • Audio:

Preposition

inter

  1. between
  2. among

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.te/

Noun

inter m (uncountable)

  1. (historical) Short for interurbain (long-distance phone service).

Ido

Etymology

Borrowed from Esperanto interEnglish inter-French inter-Italian inter-Spanish inter-, from Latin inter.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈin.ter/, /ˈin.tɛɾ/

Preposition

inter

  1. between, among
  2. (figuratively) division, exchange, reciprocity

Antonyms

  • exter

Derived terms

  • inter-

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *enter, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁entér (between). Cognates include Sanskrit अन्तर् (antár, between, within, into), Oscan ???????????????????? (anter, between), Old Irish eter (between), Albanian ndër (between, among, amid, throughout), Old High German untar (between) and German unter (among).

PIE adverb *h₁entér gave rise to the adjective *h₁énteros (inner, what is inside), whence also interior (interior) and intrā (inside, within).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈin.ter/, [ˈɪn̪t̪ɛɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈin.ter/, [ˈin̪t̪ɛr]

Preposition

inter (+ accusative)

  1. between, among
  2. during, while

Derived terms

  • inter-
  • interim

Descendants

References

  • inter in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • inter in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • inter in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • inter in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • Meyer-Lübke, Wilhelm (1911), “inter”, in Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), page 324

Sardinian

Alternative forms

  • intre

Etymology

From Latin inter.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /inter/

Preposition

inter

  1. between, among
    Synonym: intra

Yagara

Pronoun

inter

  1. Alternative form of nginda.

References

  • State Library of Queensland, 2019 INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES ‘WORD OF THE WEEK’: WEEK FIVE., 29 January 2019.

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