bury vs sink what difference

what is difference between bury and sink

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: bĕr’ē, bû’rē; IPA(key): /ˈbɛɹ.i/, /ˈbɜː.ɹi/
    • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ˈbʌ.ɹi/ (also used by some outside Scotland)
    • (Middlesbrough and Lancashire) IPA(key): /ˈbʊ.ɹi/
  • (US) enPR: bĕr’ē, bûr’ē; IPA(key): /ˈbɛɹ.i/, /ˈbɝ.i/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɹi
  • Homophone: berry

Etymology 1

Middle English burien, berien, from Old English byrġan, from Proto-Germanic *burgijaną (to keep safe), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ- (to defend, protect). Cognate with Icelandic byrgja (to cover, shut; to hold in); West Frisian bergje (to keep), German bergen (to save/rescue something); also Albanian mburojë (shield), Eastern Lithuanian bir̃ginti (to save, spare), Russian бере́чь (beréčʹ, to spare), Ossetian ӕмбӕрзын (æmbærzyn, to cover).

The spelling with ⟨u⟩ represents the pronunciation of the West Midland and Southern dialects, while the Modern English pronunciation with /ɛ/ is from the Kentish dialects.

Verb

bury (third-person singular simple present buries, present participle burying, simple past and past participle buried)

  1. (transitive) To ritualistically inter in a grave or tomb.
  2. (transitive) To place in the ground.
  3. (transitive, often figuratively) To hide or conceal as if by covering with earth or another substance.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To suppress and hide away in one’s mind.
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To put an end to; to abandon.
  6. (transitive, figuratively) To score a goal.
  7. (transitive, figuratively, slang) To kill or murder.
  8. To render imperceptible by other, more prominent stimuli; drown out.
  9. (transitive, figuratively, humorous) To outlive.
    Grandpa’s still in excellent health. He’ll bury us all!
Derived terms
Related terms
  • burian
Translations

Noun

bury (plural buries)

  1. (obsolete) A burrow.

References

Etymology 2

See borough.

Noun

bury (plural buries)

  1. A borough; a manor
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. 5, “Twelfth Century”
      Indisputable, though very dim to modern vision, rests on its hill-slope that same Bury, Stow, or Town of St. Edmund; already a considerable place, not without traffic

Anagrams

  • Ruby, ruby

Polish

Etymology

A post-Mongol invasion Turkic borrowing as Ukrainian бу́рий (búryj) and Russian бу́рый (búryj), which latter see.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbu.rɨ/

Adjective

bury

  1. brownish dark grey
  2. dark grey with spots

Declension

Related terms

  • (prefix) buro-
  • (adverb) buro
  • (adjective) burawy
  • (nouns) burek, burość

Noun

bury m anim

  1. (regional) bear (ursid)

Further reading

  • bury in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots

Etymology

From English bury. Replacing native form bery.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌri/

Verb

bury (third-person singular present buries, present participle buryin, past buriet, past participle buriet)

  1. (transitive) to bury


English

Etymology

From Old English sincan, from Proto-Germanic *sinkwaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sengʷ- (to fall, sink). Compare West Frisian sinke, Low German sinken, Dutch zinken, German sinken, Danish and Norwegian Bokmål synke, Swedish sjunka. In the causative sense, it replaced Old English senċan (make sink) from Proto-Germanic *sankwijaną.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /sɪŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk
  • Homophones: sync, synch, cinque

Verb

sink (third-person singular simple present sinks, present participle sinking, simple past sank or sunk, past participle sunk or sunken)

  1. (heading, physical) To move or be moved into something.
    1. (ergative) To descend or submerge (or to cause to do so) into a liquid or similar substance.
    2. (transitive) To cause a vessel to sink, generally by making it no longer watertight.
    3. (transitive) To push (something) into something.
    4. (transitive) To make by digging or delving.
      to sink a well in the ground
    5. (transitive, snooker, pool, billiards, golf) To pot; hit a ball into a pocket or hole.
      • 2008, Edward Keating, The Joy of Ex: A Novel
        My sister beats me at pool in public a second time. I claim some dignity back by potting two of my balls before Tammy sinks the black.
  2. (heading, social) To diminish or be diminished.
    1. (intransitive, figuratively, of the human heart) To experience apprehension, disappointment, dread, or momentary depression.
      • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, Ch.21:
        I tried, but I could not wake him. This caused me a great fear, and I looked around terrified. Then indeed, my heart sank within me. Beside the bed, as if he had stepped out of the mist, or rather as if the mist had turned into his figure, for it had entirely disappeared, stood a tall, thin man, all in black.
      • 1915, Thornton W. Burgess, The Adventures of Chatterer the Red Squirrel, Little, Brown, and Company, Boston; ch. XIX:
        Peter’s heart sank. “Don’t you think it is dreadful?” he asked.
    2. (transitive, figuratively) To cause to decline; to depress or degrade.
      • c. 1613, William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, Henry VIII, Act II, scene i:
        And if I have a conscience, let it sink me
      • 1700, Nicholas Rowe The Ambitious Stepmother, Act II, scene ii:
        Thy cruel and unnatural lust of power / Has sunk thy father more than all his years.
    3. (intransitive) To demean or lower oneself; to do something below one’s status, standards, or morals.
      • 2013, Steve Henschel, Niagara This Week, April 24:
        Who would sink so low as to steal change from veterans?
  3. (transitive, slang, archaic) To conceal and appropriate.
  4. (transitive, slang, archaic) To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.
    • 1849 December 15, Frederick William Robertson, Sermon 14, “The Principle of Spiritual Harvest”:
      I say not always dishonorable qualifications, but a certain flexibility of disposition; a certain courtly willingness to sink obnoxious truths, and adapt ourselves to the prejudices of the minds of others []
  5. (transitive, slang) To pay absolutely.
  6. (transitive, slang, archaic) To reduce or extinguish by payment.
  7. (intransitive) To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fail in strength.
    • I think our country sinks beneath the yoke.
  8. (intransitive) To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.

Usage notes

  • Use of sunk for the simple past instead of sank is not uncommon, but may be considered non-standard.

Synonyms

  • (descend into a liquid, etc): descend, go down
  • (submerge): dip, dunk, submerge
  • (cause (ship, etc) to sink):
  • (push (something) into):

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

sink (plural sinks)

  1. A basin used for holding water for washing.
  2. A drain for carrying off wastewater.
  3. (geology) A sinkhole.
  4. A depression in land where water collects, with no visible outlet.
  5. A heat sink.
  6. A place that absorbs resources or energy.
  7. (ecology) A habitat that cannot support a population on its own but receives the excess of individuals from some other source.
  8. (baseball) The motion of a sinker pitch.
    Jones has a two-seamer with heavy sink.
  9. (computing, programming) An object or callback that captures events; event sink
  10. (graph theory) a destination vertex in a transportation network
  11. An abode of degraded persons; a wretched place.
  12. A depression in a stereotype plate.
  13. (theater) A stage trap-door for shifting scenery.
  14. (mining) An excavation less than a shaft.
  15. (game development) One or several systems that remove currency from the game’s economy, thus controlling or preventing inflation
    Antonym: faucet

Synonyms

  • (basin): basin, washbasin; see also washbasin for washing fixtures without water supply

Antonyms

  • (destination vertex): source

Derived terms

  • (washbasin): vessel sink

Translations

Related terms

  • countersink
  • everything but the kitchen sink

References

  • Honey, I sunk the boat, The Grammarphobia Blog

Anagrams

  • -kins, inks, k’ins, kins, skin

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /səŋk/

Etymology 1

From Dutch zinken, from Middle Dutch sinken, from Old Dutch *sincan, from Proto-Germanic *sinkwaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sengʷ- (to fall, sink).

Verb

sink (present sink, present participle sinkende, past participle gesink)

  1. (intransitive) to sink

Etymology 2

From Dutch zink, from German Zink.

Noun

sink (uncountable)

  1. zinc

Estonian

Noun

sink (genitive singi, partitive sinki)

  1. ham

Declension


Faroese

Etymology

From German Zink.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪŋ̊k/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ̊k

Noun

sink n (genitive singular sinks, uncountable)

  1. (metal) zinc

Declension

Derived terms

  • sinksalva

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ̊k

Noun

sink n (genitive singular sinks, no plural)

  1. zinc (chemical element)

Declension

Anagrams

  • skin

Mauritian Creole

Numeral

sink

  1. Alternative spelling of senk

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

sink m or n (definite singular sinken or sinket) (uncountable)

  1. zinc (chemical element, symbol Zn)

Derived terms

  • forsinke
  • sinksulfat

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From German Zink.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɪŋk/

Noun

sink m or n (definite singular sinken or sinket) (uncountable)

  1. zinc (chemical element, symbol Zn)

Derived terms

  • sinksulfat

References

  • “sink” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

West Frisian

Verb

sink

  1. first-person singular present of sinke
  2. imperative of sinke

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial