bury vs swallow what difference

what is difference between bury and swallow

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: bĕr’ē, bû’rē; IPA(key): /ˈbɛɹ.i/, /ˈbɜː.ɹi/
    • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ˈbʌ.ɹi/ (also used by some outside Scotland)
    • (Middlesbrough and Lancashire) IPA(key): /ˈbʊ.ɹi/
  • (US) enPR: bĕr’ē, bûr’ē; IPA(key): /ˈbɛɹ.i/, /ˈbɝ.i/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɹi
  • Homophone: berry

Etymology 1

Middle English burien, berien, from Old English byrġan, from Proto-Germanic *burgijaną (to keep safe), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ- (to defend, protect). Cognate with Icelandic byrgja (to cover, shut; to hold in); West Frisian bergje (to keep), German bergen (to save/rescue something); also Albanian mburojë (shield), Eastern Lithuanian bir̃ginti (to save, spare), Russian бере́чь (beréčʹ, to spare), Ossetian ӕмбӕрзын (æmbærzyn, to cover).

The spelling with ⟨u⟩ represents the pronunciation of the West Midland and Southern dialects, while the Modern English pronunciation with /ɛ/ is from the Kentish dialects.

Verb

bury (third-person singular simple present buries, present participle burying, simple past and past participle buried)

  1. (transitive) To ritualistically inter in a grave or tomb.
  2. (transitive) To place in the ground.
  3. (transitive, often figuratively) To hide or conceal as if by covering with earth or another substance.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To suppress and hide away in one’s mind.
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To put an end to; to abandon.
  6. (transitive, figuratively) To score a goal.
  7. (transitive, figuratively, slang) To kill or murder.
  8. To render imperceptible by other, more prominent stimuli; drown out.
  9. (transitive, figuratively, humorous) To outlive.
    Grandpa’s still in excellent health. He’ll bury us all!
Derived terms
Related terms
  • burian
Translations

Noun

bury (plural buries)

  1. (obsolete) A burrow.

References

Etymology 2

See borough.

Noun

bury (plural buries)

  1. A borough; a manor
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. 5, “Twelfth Century”
      Indisputable, though very dim to modern vision, rests on its hill-slope that same Bury, Stow, or Town of St. Edmund; already a considerable place, not without traffic

Anagrams

  • Ruby, ruby

Polish

Etymology

A post-Mongol invasion Turkic borrowing as Ukrainian бу́рий (búryj) and Russian бу́рый (búryj), which latter see.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbu.rɨ/

Adjective

bury

  1. brownish dark grey
  2. dark grey with spots

Declension

Related terms

  • (prefix) buro-
  • (adverb) buro
  • (adjective) burawy
  • (nouns) burek, burość

Noun

bury m anim

  1. (regional) bear (ursid)

Further reading

  • bury in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots

Etymology

From English bury. Replacing native form bery.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌri/

Verb

bury (third-person singular present buries, present participle buryin, past buriet, past participle buriet)

  1. (transitive) to bury


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈswɒləʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈswɑloʊ/
    • (general) [ˈswɑɫoʊ̯]
    • (Philadelphia) [ˈswɑwɜʊ̯]
  • Rhymes: -ɒləʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English swolowen, swolwen, swolȝen, swelwen, swelȝen, from Old English swelgan (to swallow, incorporate, absorb, imbibe, devour), from Proto-Germanic *swelganą (to swallow, revel, devour), from Proto-Indo-European *swelk- (to gulp). Cognate with Dutch zwelgen (to revel, carouse, guzzle), German schwelgen (to delight, indulge), Swedish svälja (to swallow, gulp), Icelandic svelgja (to swallow), Old English swillan, swilian (to swill, wash out, gargle). See also swill.

The noun is from late Old English swelg (gulf, chasm), from the verb.

Alternative forms

  • swalow, swolow (obsolete)

Verb

swallow (third-person singular simple present swallows, present participle swallowing, simple past and past participle swallowed)

  1. (transitive) To cause (food, drink etc.) to pass from the mouth into the stomach; to take into the stomach through the throat. [from 11th c.]
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4:
      What the liquor was I do not know, but it was not so strong but that I could swallow it in great gulps and found it less burning than my burning throat.
    • 2011, Jonathan Jones, The Guardian, 21 Apr 2011:
      Clothes are to be worn and food is to be swallowed: they remain trapped in the physical world.
  2. (transitive) To take (something) in so that it disappears; to consume, absorb. [from 13th c.]
    • The necessary provision of the life swallows the greatest part of their time.
    • 2010, “What are the wild waves saying”, The Economist, 28 Oct 2010:
      His body, like so many others swallowed by the ocean’s hungry maw, was never found.
  3. (intransitive) To take food down into the stomach; to make the muscular contractions of the oesophagus to achieve this, often taken as a sign of nervousness or strong emotion. [from 18th c.]
  4. (transitive) To accept easily or without questions; to believe, accept. [from 16th c.]
    • 1920, Katherine Miller (translating Romain Rolland), Clerambault
      this humbug was readily swallowed by men who were supposed to be intelligent,
    • 2011, Madeleine Bunting, The Guardian, 22 Apr 2011:
      Americans swallowed his tale because they wanted to.
  5. (intransitive) To engross; to appropriate; usually with up.
  6. (transitive) To retract; to recant.
  7. (transitive) To put up with; to bear patiently or without retaliation.
Synonyms
  • (to cause to pass from the mouth into the stomach): consume, devour, eat, gulp
  • (to take in): absorb, assimilate, engulf, incorporate, swallow up, overwhelm; see also Thesaurus:integrate
  • (to make muscular contractions of the oesophagus): gulp
  • (to believe or accept): buy, creed, credit
  • (to engross): absorb, engage, immerse,monopolize, take over, occupy
  • (to retract): disavow, take back, unsay; See also Thesaurus:recant
  • (to put up with): brook, endure, live with; See also Thesaurus:tolerate
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

swallow (countable and uncountable, plural swallows)

  1. (archaic) A deep chasm or abyss in the earth.
  2. (archaic) The mouth and throat; that which is used for swallowing; the gullet.
  3. The amount swallowed in one gulp; the act of swallowing.
  4. (Nigeria) Any of various carbohydrate-based dishes that are swallowed without much chewing.
Translations

See also

  • dysphagia

Etymology 2

From Middle English swalwe, swalewe, swalowe, from Old English swealwe, from Proto-West Germanic *swalwā, from Proto-Germanic *swalwǭ. Cognate with Danish and Norwegian svale, Dutch zwaluw, German Schwalbe, Swedish svala.

Noun

swallow (plural swallows)

  1. A small, migratory bird of the Hirundinidae family with long, pointed, moon-shaped wings and a forked tail which feeds on the wing by catching insects.
  2. (nautical) The aperture in a block through which the rope reeves.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ham. Nav. Encyc to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (bird of Hirundinidae): martin
Derived terms
Related terms
  • (bird of Hirundinidae): martlet (type of feetless bird in heraldry)
Translations

Anagrams

  • wallows

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