bus vs jitney what difference

what is difference between bus and jitney

English

Etymology

Clipping of omnibus. The electrical sense is derived from figurative application of the automotive sense.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʌs/, enPR: bŭs
    • (Northern England, Ireland) IPA(key): /bʊs/
    • (General Australian, General New Zealand, Received Pronunciation, Scotland, Mid-Atlantic) IPA(key): /bɐs/
    • (Northern Cities Vowel Shift, Ireland) IPA(key): /bɔs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Noun

bus (plural buses or busses)

  1. (automotive) A motor vehicle for transporting large numbers of people along roads.
  2. An electrical conductor or interface serving as a common connection for two or more circuits or components.
  3. Part of a MIRV missile, having on-board motors used to deliver the warhead to a target.
  4. (medical industry, slang) An ambulance.

Synonyms

  • (electrical conductor): electrical bus, busbar, digit trunk
  • (vehicle): autobus, coach, loser cruiser, motorbus, multibus, omnibus, Shillibeer (obsolete)

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

See bus/translations § Noun.

Verb

bus (third-person singular simple present busses or buses, present participle bussing or busing, simple past and past participle bussed or bused)

  1. (transitive, automotive, transport) To transport via a motor bus.
  2. (transitive, automotive, transport, chiefly US) To transport students to school, often to a more distant school for the purposes of achieving racial integration.
    • 1966, Phil Ochs, “Love Me, I’m a Liberal”, Phils Ochs in Concert.
    • 2008, Ashley R. Holm, Racial Differences in Student Engagement and Attainment: A Study of Topeka High School, 1939–1984, ProQuest →ISBN, page 23
      …to strike down Detroit’s federal court order to bus students across school district lines for the purpose of desegregation and therefore nullify many busing programs throughout the country.
  3. (intransitive, automotive, transport) To travel by bus.
  4. (transitive, US, food service) To clear meal remains from.
    He bussed tables as the restaurant emptied out.
  5. (intransitive, US, food service) To work at clearing the remains of meals from tables or counters; to work as a busboy.
    He’s been bussing for minimum wage.

Usage notes

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary only presents the spellings buses, busing, and bused, implying that these are the predominant forms in Canada.

Derived terms

  • (clear meal remains): busboy

Translations

See bus/translations § Verb.

Anagrams

  • SBU, UBS, USB, sub, sub-, sub.

Afar

Etymology

Akin to Saho bus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbus/
  • Hyphenation: bus

Noun

bús m (plural buswá f or busuusá f)

  1. vagina

Declension

References

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “bus”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN

Afrikaans

Noun

bus (plural busse, diminutive bussie)

  1. (automotive) bus

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbus/
  • Homophone: vos (Central)

Etymology 1

Cognate to Spanish buso (underwater snail) and Portuguese búzio (underwater snail), from Latin būcina (horn).

Noun

bus m or f (plural bussos)

  1. diver

Etymology 2

Probably from Old Norse buza (big wide ship).

Noun

bus m (plural bussos)

  1. (archaic) A large sailing ship used in the 12th and 13th centuries, broad of beam and with two or three masts.

Etymology 3

Probably from Persian بوس(bus, kiss).

Noun

bus m (plural busos)

  1. (archaic) flattery
Usage notes

Only found in the phrase fer lo bus (to kiss up).

Etymology 4

Clipping of autobús.

Noun

bus m (plural busos)

  1. bus (vehicle)

Etymology 5

Borrowed from English bus.

Noun

bus m (plural busos)

  1. bus (electrical connector)

Cimbrian

Etymology

From Italian bus, a clipping of omnibus, from French omnibus.

Noun

bus m

  1. (Luserna) bus (vehicle)

References

  • “bus” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Czech

Noun

bus m

  1. bus (motor vehicle for transporting large numbers of people along roads)

Synonyms

  • autobus

Danish

Etymology

Shortening of omnibus, from French omnibus, from Latin omnibus (for all), dative plural of omnis (all).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bus/, [b̥us]

Noun

bus c (singular definite bussen, plural indefinite busser)

  1. bus, coach

Inflection


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʏs/
  • Hyphenation: bus
  • Rhymes: -ʏs

Etymology 1

Shortening of omnibus, from Latin omnibus (for everything/all); dative plural of omnis (all).

Noun

bus m (plural bussen, diminutive busje n)

  1. (transport) bus, omnibus (vehicle)
  2. (transport, in diminutive) minibus, minivan
  3. bus (electrical conductor)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: bùs

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch busse, from Old Dutch *bussa, from Proto-West Germanic *buhsā.

Noun

bus f (plural bussen, diminutive busje n)

  1. A container, a box, a tin.
  2. A bushing.
  3. (chiefly historical) One of a variety of early modern firearms, such as flintlock and matchlock guns.
  4. (dated, Netherlands) A voluntary sick fund, especially before the introduction of universal health care in the Netherlands in the 1940s.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • buks
Descendants
  • Petjo: bus
  • Indonesian: bis (letterbox, mailbox)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form. Related to etymology 2.

Verb

bus

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bussen
  2. imperative of bussen

French

Etymology 1

Clipping of omnibus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bys/
  • Homophones: busse, busses, bussent

Noun

bus m or f (plural bus)

  1. bus
Synonyms
  • autobus

Derived terms

  • arrêt de bus
  • bus accordéon
  • bus scolaire
  • service rapide par bus

Etymology 2

Inflected forms.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /by/
  • Homophones: bu, bue, bues, but, bût

Verb

bus

  1. first-person singular past historic of boire
  2. second-person singular past historic of boire

Verb

bus m pl

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of boire

Further reading

  • “bus” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Etymology 1

From Dutch bus, from Latin omnibus (for everything/all); dative plural of omnis (all).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbʊs] (standard)
  • IPA(key): [ˈbɪs], [ˈbəs] (dialect, nonstandard)
  • Hyphenation: bus

Noun

bus (plural bus-bus, first-person possessive busku, second-person possessive busmu, third-person possessive busnya)

  1. bus: a motor vehicle for transporting large numbers of people along roads.

Alternative forms

  • bis (nonstandard)

Etymology 2

Onomatopoeic, related to hembus

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʊs/
  • Hyphenation: bus

Noun

bus (first-person possessive busku, second-person possessive busmu, third-person possessive busnya)

  1. wind

Further reading

  • “bus” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Irish

Etymology

Borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bˠʊsˠ]

Noun

bus m (genitive singular bus, nominative plural busanna)

  1. bus
  2. (computing) bus

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • “bus” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • “bus” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • Entries containing “bus” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.

Lithuanian

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bʊs]

Verb

bùs

  1. third-person singular future of būti
  2. third-person plural future of būti
  3. third-person singular future of busti
  4. third-person plural future of busti

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian buca, ultimately from Latin bucca, whence French French bouche.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /byːs/

Noun

bus

  1. hole

Middle Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *bussus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to swell, bulge).

Noun

bus (gender unknown)

  1. (rare, poetic) lip

Descendants

  • Irish: pus
  • Scottish Gaelic: bus

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “4 bus”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*bussu-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 84

Norman

Verb

bus

  1. first-person singular preterite of baithe

Polish

Etymology

Contraction of autobus, borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bus/

Noun

bus m anim (diminutive busik)

  1. (colloquial) bus

Declension

Further reading

  • bus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bus in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romagnol

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bus/

Noun

bus m

  1. hole
    • September 2012, Daniela Cortesi, Bônanòta in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 15:
      un sorg e’ cor in priscia int e’ su bus.

      a mouse runs hastily towards its hole.

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pus̪/

Etymology 1

From Middle Irish bus.

Noun

bus m (genitive singular buis, plural buis or busan)

  1. mouth
    Synonym: beul
  2. pout (facial expression)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English bus.

Noun

bus m (genitive singular bus, plural busaichean)

  1. bus

Mutation


Somali

Noun

bus ?

  1. dust

Spanish

Etymology

Shortening of autobús or borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbus/, [ˈbus]

Noun

bus m (plural buses)

  1. Clipping of autobús; bus
    Synonym: autobús

Derived terms

  • bus de cortesía
  • busero

Related terms

Further reading

  • “bus” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

From the verb busa (to do mischief).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʉːs/, [bʉ͍ːs]
  • Rhymes: -ʉːs

Noun

bus n (uncountable)

  1. very innocent mischief, prank
    Trick or Treat is often translated with Bus eller godis
  2. general noise or trouble made by gangs of youths

Declension

Derived terms

  • busig
  • NetBus

Anagrams

  • sub

Tagalog

Etymology

Borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation

  • (Older) IPA(key): /bus/, [bʊs]
  • (Newer) IPA(key): /bas/, [bɐs]

Noun

bus

  1. bus (vehicle)

Related terms

  • sasakyan
  • kotse
  • transit

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English bush.

Pronunciation

Noun

bus

  1. bush (remote rural areas)

Derived terms

  • bus kanaka

West Flemish

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch busch, variant of bosch, from Old Dutch *busc, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz.

Noun

bus n

  1. forest

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Same as Dutch “bus”, but is it derived from that or shortened from “omnibus” independently?”)

Noun

bus m

  1. bus


English

Etymology

1886, originally for a five-cent US coin (a nickel); use for taxis and buses due to these services originally charging five cents as fare, popularized circa 1915.

The etymology is uncertain; it is believed to originate from Louisiana Creole French jetnée, from French jeton (token, coin-sized metal disc), though this is disputed. Evidence for the Louisiana Creole French origin include the geographic distribution (Southeastern US, especially Negro/African-American), and early spelling as gitney, which is common French spelling for the /ji/ pronunciation.

Noun

jitney (plural jitneys)

  1. A small bus or minibus which typically operates service on a fixed route, sometimes scheduled.
  2. An unlicensed taxi cab.
  3. A shared-ride taxi.
  4. (US, archaic) A small coin, a nickel.
  5. (in attributive use, US, archaic) Very inexpensive.
  6. (Canada) An informal lawn bowling or curling competition in which all players present are randomly drawn into teams.
  7. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) A fraudulent arrangement whereby a broker who has direct access to an exchange executes trades on behalf of a broker who does not.

References


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