bush vs shrub what difference

what is difference between bush and shrub

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʊʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʊʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English bush, from Old English busċ, *bysċ (copse, grove, scrub, in placenames), from Proto-West Germanic *busk, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz (bush, thicket), probably from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to grow).

Cognate with West Frisian bosk (forest), Dutch bos (forest), German Busch (bush), Danish and Norwegian busk (bush, shrub), Swedish buske (bush, shrub), Persian بیشه(biše, woods). Latin and Romance forms (Latin boscus, Occitan bòsc, French bois and buisson, Italian bosco and boscaglia, Spanish bosque, Portuguese bosque) derive from the Germanic. The sense ‘pubic hair’ was first attested in 1745.

Noun

bush (plural bushes)

  1. (horticulture) A woody plant distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, being usually less than six metres tall; a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category.
  2. A shrub cut off, or a shrublike branch of a tree.
  3. (historical) A shrub or branch, properly, a branch of ivy (sacred to Bacchus), hung out at vintners’ doors, or as a tavern sign; hence, a tavern sign, and symbolically, the tavern itself.
  4. (slang, vulgar) A person’s pubic hair, especially a woman’s.
    • 1749, John Cleland, Memoirs Of Fanny Hill, Gutenberg eBook #25305,
      As he stood on one side, unbuttoning his waistcoat and breeches, her fat brawny thighs hung down, and the whole greasy landscape lay fairly open to my view; a wide open mouthed gap, overshaded with a grizzly bush, seemed held out like a beggar′s wallet for its provision.
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 787:
      But no, the little pool of semen was there, proof positive, with droplets caught hanging in her bush.
  5. (hunting) The tail, or brush, of a fox.
Synonyms
  • (category of woody plant): shrub
  • See also Thesaurus:pubic hair
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bush (third-person singular simple present bushes, present participle bushing, simple past and past participle bushed)

  1. (intransitive) To branch thickly in the manner of a bush.
    • 1726, Homer, Alexander Pope (translator), The Odyssey, 1839, Samuel Johnson (editor), The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Esq., page 404,
      Around it, and above, for ever green, / The bushing alders form’d a shady scene.
  2. To set bushes for; to support with bushes.
    to bush peas
  3. To use a bush harrow on (land), for covering seeds sown; to harrow with a bush.
    to bush a piece of land; to bush seeds into the ground
  4. To become bushy (often used with up).
    I can tell when my cat is upset because he’ll bush up his tail.

Etymology 2

From the sign of a bush usually employed to indicate such places.

Noun

bush (plural bushes)

  1. (archaic) A tavern or wine merchant.
Derived terms
  • good wine needs no bush

Etymology 3

From older Dutch bosch (modern bos (wood, forest)), first appearing in the Dutch colonies to designate an uncleared district of a colony, and thence adopted in British colonies as bush. Could alternatively be interpreted as a semantic loan, as bush (etymology 1) is cognate to the aforementioned archaic Dutch bosch.

Noun

bush (countable and uncountable, plural bushes)

  1. (often with “the”) Tracts of land covered in natural vegetation that are largely undeveloped and uncultivated.
    1. (Australia) The countryside area of Australia that is less arid and less remote than the outback; loosely, areas of natural flora even within conurbations.
    2. (New Zealand) An area of New Zealand covered in forest, especially native forest.
    3. (Canada) The wild forested areas of Canada; upcountry.
  2. (Canada) A woodlot or bluff on a farm.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • bushman (not derived from bush but separately derived from cognate Dutch)
Translations
Descendants
  • Dutch: bush, bushbush
See also
  • backblock, outback

Adverb

bush (not comparable)

  1. (Australia) Towards the direction of the outback.
    On hatching, the chicks scramble to the surface and head bush on their own.

Etymology 4

Back-formation from bush league.

Adjective

bush (comparative more bush, superlative most bush)

  1. (colloquial) Not skilled; not professional; not major league.
    They’re supposed to be a major league team, but so far they’ve been bush.

Noun

bush

  1. (baseball) Amateurish behavior, short for “bush league behavior”

Etymology 5

From Middle Dutch busse (box; wheel bushing), from Proto-West Germanic *buhsā. More at box.

Noun

bush (plural bushes)

  1. A thick washer or hollow cylinder of metal.
  2. A mechanical attachment, usually a metallic socket with a screw thread, such as the mechanism by which a camera is attached to a tripod stand.
  3. A piece of copper, screwed into a gun, through which the venthole is bored.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Farrow to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (washer or cylinder): bushing
Related terms
  • reducing bush

Verb

bush (third-person singular simple present bushes, present participle bushing, simple past and past participle bushed)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with a bush or lining.
    to bush a pivot hole

Anagrams

  • Shub, hubs

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • bushk

Etymology 1

Either borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin buxus, or from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH (to grow) (compare Dutch bos (woods), English bush).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /buʃ/

Noun

bush m (indefinite plural bushe, definite singular bushi, definite plural bushet)

  1. (botany) boxwood (Buxus sempervirens)
Derived terms
  • bushtë
  • bushnjesh
  • bushk

Etymology 2

Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH (to grow).

Noun

bush m (indefinite plural busha, definite singular bushi, definite plural bushat)

  1. a mythological monster

Declension

Derived terms
  • bushtër
Related terms
  • bisht

References


Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • bushu, bushtu

Etymology

Compare Romanian buș.

Noun

bush m (plural bush) or n (plural bushi/bushe)

  1. fist

Synonyms

  • shub, pulmu, huftã, mãnatã

Burushaski

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [buʃ]

Noun

bush (plural bushongo)

  1. cat

See also

  • gus bush
  • hir bush
  • bushe isko

References

Sadaf Munshi (2015), “Word Lists”, in Burushaski Language Documentation Project[4].


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • buss, bosh, buish, boish, busk, bosk

Etymology

From Old English busc, bysc, from Proto-West Germanic *busk. Cognates include Middle Dutch bosch, busch, Middle High German busch, bosch, and also Old French bois, buisson.

Noun

bush (plural bushes)

  1. bush (low-lying plant)

Descendants

  • English: bush
  • Scots: bus
  • Yola: bushe

References

  • “bush, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: shrŭb, IPA(key): /ʃɹʌb/
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Etymology 1

From Middle English schrub, schrob, (also unassibilated as scrub), from Old English *sċrob (in placenames) and sċrybb (a shrub; shrubbery; underbrush); akin to Norwegian skrubbe (the dwarf cornel tree).

Noun

shrub (plural shrubs)

  1. A woody plant smaller than a tree, and usually with several stems from the same base.
Synonyms
  • bush (plant)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

shrub (third-person singular simple present shrubs, present participle shrubbing, simple past and past participle shrubbed)

  1. (obsolete) To lop; to prune.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Anderson (1573) to this entry?)
  2. (transitive, Kenyan English) To mispronounce a word by replacing its consonant sound(s) with another or others of a similar place of articulation.
    For example, /ʃɹʌb//sɹʌb/

Etymology 2

From Arabic شِرَاب(širāb, a drink, beverage), شَرِبَ(šariba, to drink), akin to syrup, sherbet

Noun

shrub (countable and uncountable, plural shrubs)

  1. A liquor composed of vegetable acid, fruit juice (especially lemon), sugar, sometimes vinegar, and a small amount of spirit as a preservative. Modern shrub is usually non-alcoholic, but in earlier times it was often mixed with a substantial amount of spirit such as brandy or rum, thus making it a liqueur.
Translations

Anagrams

  • Brush, bruhs, brush, burhs

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