bust vs raid what difference

what is difference between bust and raid

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌst/
  • Rhymes: -ʌst
  • Homophones: bussed, bused

Etymology 1

From French buste < Italian busto, from Latin būstum.

Noun

bust (plural busts)

  1. A sculptural portrayal of a person’s head and shoulders.
  2. The breasts and upper thorax of a woman.
  3. (economics) The downward portion of a boom and bust cycle; a recession.
  4. (slang) A police raid or takedown of a criminal enterprise.
  5. (slang) A disappointment.
Derived terms
  • bust improver
  • busty
  • overbust
  • underbust
Translations

Etymology 2

From a variant of burst. Compare German Low German basten and barsten (to burst).

Verb

bust (third-person singular simple present busts, present participle busting, simple past and past participle busted or bust)

  1. (transitive, colloquial, chiefly US) To break.
    I busted my cooker while trying to fix it.
  2. (transitive, slang) To arrest (someone) for a crime.
  3. (transitive, slang) To catch (someone) in the act of doing something wrong, socially and morally inappropriate, or illegal, especially when being done in a sneaky or secretive state.
  4. (snowboarding) An emphatic synonym of do or get.
  5. (US, informal) To reduce in rank.
    • 1962, The Manchurian Candidate, 01:56:35
      If Steinkamp doesn’t take off that hat and stop messing around, I’m gonna bust him into a PFC.
  6. (finance, transitive) To undo a trade, generally an error trade, that has already been executed.
  7. (poker) To lose all of one’s chips.
  8. (blackjack) To exceed a score of 21.
  9. (transitive, slang) To break in (an animal).
  10. (intransitive, slang) To ejaculate; to eject semen.
  11. (journalism, intransitive) For a headline to exceed the amount of space reserved for it.
    • 1990, Paul Williams, The Computerized Newspaper: A Practical Guide for Systems Users (page 105)
      The temptation to squeeze in a favourite headline that busts by using the flexibility of new technology is often very strong.
    • 2007, Rob Steen, Sports Journalism: A Multimedia Primer (page 167)
      If your headline busts (breaks the confines of the layout) you will know straightaway. Similarly, the computer will inform you, in terms of the number of lines, how much longer or shorter the copy is in relation to the space allotted.
Synonyms
  • (to arrest for a crime): nick
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

bust (plural busts)

  1. (slang) The act of arresting someone for a crime, or raiding a suspected criminal operation.
  2. (slang) A failed enterprise; a bomb.
  3. (chess, informal) A refutation of an opening, or of a previously published analysis.
  4. (sports, derogatory) A player who fails to meet expectations.
Derived terms
  • or bust
Translations

Adjective

bust (not comparable)

  1. (slang) Without any money, broke, bankrupt.
    After months of financial problems, the company finally went bust.

Derived terms

  • bust up/bust-up
  • busted (adjective)
  • buster

Anagrams

  • BTUs, TBUs, but’s, buts, stub, tubs

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin būstum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbust/

Noun

bust m (plural busts or bustos)

  1. bust (sculpture)
  2. bust (breasts and upper thorax)

Further reading

  • “bust” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

bust

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of bussen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of bussen

Romanian

Etymology

From French buste.

Noun

bust n (plural busturi)

  1. bust (sculpture)

Declension



English

Alternative forms

  • rade (Scotland)

Etymology

From Scots raid (obsolete after Middle English but revived in the 19th-century by Walter Scott), from Old English rād. Doublet of road.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹeɪd/
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Noun

raid (plural raids)

  1. (military) A quick hostile or predatory incursion or invasion in a battle.
    • 1805, Sir Walter Scott, The Lay of the Last Minstrel, p. 109:
      Marauding chief! his sole delight / The moonlight raid, the morning fight.
    • 1872, Herbert Spencer, The Principles of Biology, vol. 1, p. 315:
      There are permanent conquests, temporary occupation, and occasional raids.
  2. An attack or invasion for the purpose of making arrests, seizing property, or plundering.
  3. (sports) An attacking movement.
  4. (Internet) An activity initiated at or towards the end of a live broadcast by the broadcaster that sends its viewers to a different broadcast, primarily intended to boost the viewership of the receiving broadcaster. This is frequently accompanied by a message in the form of a hashtag that is posted in the broadcast’s chat by the viewers.
  5. (online gaming) A large group in a massively multiplayer online game, consisting of multiple parties who team up to defeat a powerful enemy.

Synonyms

  • (hostile or predatory invasion): attack, foray, incursion
  • (attack or invasion for making arrests, seizing property, or plundering): irruption

Derived terms

  • air raid, air-raid

Translations

Verb

raid (third-person singular simple present raids, present participle raiding, simple past and past participle raided)

  1. (transitive) To engage in a raid against.
    The police raided the gambling den.
    The soldiers raided the village and burned it down.
  2. (transitive) To lure from another; to entice away from.
  3. (transitive) To indulge oneself by taking from.
    I raided the fridge for snacks.

Derived terms

  • raider
  • ramraid

Translations

Anagrams

  • Aird, Dair, Dari, IARD, Irad, arid, dari, dira, riad

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English raid, from Scots raid.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁɛd/
  • Homophone: raide

Noun

raid m (plural raids)

  1. (military) raid

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “raid” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • dira, rida

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English raid, from Scots raid.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrajd/, /ˈrɛjd/, /ˈrejd/

Noun

raid m (invariable)

  1. raid, incursion
  2. long-distance race or rally

References

Anagrams

  • Idra, ardi, ardì, dari, dirà, idra, radi, rida, ridà

Romanian

Etymology

From French raid.

Noun

raid n (plural raiduri)

  1. raid

Declension


Scots

Etymology

From (a Northern form of) Old English rād (riding, road).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /red/

Noun

raid (plural raids)

  1. raid

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English raid, from Scots raid.

Noun

raid m (plural raides)

  1. raid (military)
  2. attempt
  3. long-distance race


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