butch vs dike what difference

what is difference between butch and dike

English

Etymology

Originally, it was probably used as an abbreviation of butcher. Later, in the 1940s, the sense “masculine lesbian” was developed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʊtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʊtʃ

Adjective

butch (comparative butcher or more butch, superlative butchest or most butch)

  1. (slang, originally Polari) Very masculine, with a masculine appearance or attitude.
    • 1979, Colin MacInnes, Out of the way: later essays:
      Nor can I credit that a — to put it crudely — proud bisexual butch Italian — albeit one lonely, poor, emotional and without strong will — which Giovanni is shown to be in the earlier part of the book, should become, in a mere matter of months, and as the result of any happening, the venal hysterical fairy that he does.
    • 2007, Beth A. Firestein, Becoming Visible: Counseling Bisexuals Across the Lifespan, Columbia University Press (→ISBN), page 305:
      The process of appreciating a butch aesthetic may be even more complex for bisexual butch women. In contrast to lesbian butches who may date only within a butch-femme community, bisexual butch women may be more likely to [] In comparison to butch bisexual women, it may be easier for femme bisexual women to locate male and female dating partners []
    • 2014, Naomi S Tucker, Bisexual Politics: Theories, Queries, and Visions, Routledge (→ISBN), page 186:
      More of the rotten responses I receive about being a bisexual butch woman come from other bisexuals, particularly men, who don’t want to deal with any woman who is not some Barbie doll standard of femininity.

Synonyms

  • macho, manly, mannish, unfeminine, masc

Translations

Noun

butch (plural butches)

  1. (slang, LGBT, countable) A lesbian who appears masculine or acts in a masculine manner.
    • 1997, Bi Academic Intervention, Bisexual Imaginary: Representation, Identity, and Desire, A&C Black (→ISBN), page 30, quoting Jo Eadie:
      Coming out appeals to the narcissistic pleasure of presenting to another a finished image of ourselves, which they return to us in exactly the same form: [someone tells] you [they are] a bisexual butch, and you confirm it. But instead, it seems all too likely – especially, perhaps, for bisexuals, whose claims to identity always need that much more proof – that no such mirror-image will be returned.

Synonyms

  • (masculine lesbian): bull dyke, dyke
  • See also Thesaurus:female homosexual

Antonyms

  • femme

Derived terms

  • soft butch
  • stone butch

Translations

Anagrams

  • bucht

French

Etymology

English butch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /butʃ/

Noun

butch f (plural butchs)

  1. a butch (masculine queer woman) (contrast fem)
    • 2001, Marie-Hélène Bourcier, Queer zones: politiques des identités sexuelles, des représentations et des savoirs:
      [] un couple qui fonctionne requiert des individus dichotomiques qu’il s’agisse d’un homme et d’une femme ou bien d’une butch et d’une femme”, Lilian Faderman, Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers, A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth Century.
    • 2005, Marie-Hélène Bourcier, Sexpolitiques: queer zones 2, La Fabrique éditions:
      Une butch qui n’aurait aucune sexualité en laisserait-elle tomber pour autant: la chemise, le monocle, les Doc Martens, []
    • 2007, Eli Flory, Ces femmes qui aiment les femmes, Archipel (→ISBN):
      Une butch n’est pas une fem, qui n’est pas une lipstick. [] À l’origine, butch se disait aussi bien pour un homme que pour une femme qui accusait une apparence « très masculine ». Le butch man est l’homme  []
    • 2007, Les inrockuptibles:
      On me traitait comme ça, comme une butch. Mais la plupart des femmes avec [] Mais il me traitait comme une femme. C’était totalement []
    • 2008, Claude Guillon, Je chante le corps critique: Les usages politiques du corps
      [] à jouer tel rôle social de sexe, en manifestent néanmoins ardemment le désir ou en arborent les signes extérieurs de manière la plus ostentatoire possible. Une butch américaine déclare : « Je n’ai jamais renoncé à la femme qui est en moi. »
    • 2012, Gaëtan Duchateau, Florent Guerlain, Dernier inventaire avant le mariage pour tous, Stock (→ISBN), page 40:
      En 1995, Josiane Balasko apparaît sous les traits d’une butch (voir Argot) de compétition dans Gazon maudit, qu’elle a []
    • 2013, Denise Mina, La fin de la saison des guêpes, Le Masque (→ISBN):
      Cette femme n’avait rien d’une butch, mais c’était un look que les lesbiennes ne suivaient plus.

German

Etymology

From English butch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bʊt͡ʃ]

Adjective

butch (not comparable)

  1. butch

Declension

Further reading

  • “butch” in Duden online


English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Noun

dike (plural dikes)

  1. (chiefly US) Alternative form of dyke: ditch; embankment; waterway; etc.

Verb

dike (third-person singular simple present dikes, present participle diking, simple past and past participle diked)

  1. (chiefly US) Alternative form of dyke: to dig a ditch; to raise an earthwork; etc.
    • {quote-journal|en|date=1996 September 27|author=Michael Miner|url=https://securesite.chireader.com/cgi-bin/Archive/abridged2.bat?path=1996/960927/HOTTYPE%7Ctitle=WVON Won’t Take the Bait|work=The Chicago Reader|text=Lakeside water-filtration plants, an 11,000-acre diked airport east of 55th Street, slash-and-bulldoze highway projects through Jackson and Lincoln parks—these and many another grandiose project leapt from the sketchbooks of city planners.}}
    • {quote-book|en|date=2001 November 16, Karen F. Schmidt|url=http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/294/5546/1444%7Cdoi=10.1126/science.294.5546.1444%7Ctitle=Ecology: A True-Blue Vision for the Danube|work=Science|volume=294|issue=5546|pages=1444-1447|text=In 1983, dictator Nicolae Ceausescu decreed that the Romanian Danube delta, one of Europe’s largest wetlands, be diked for growing rice and maize.}}

Etymology 2

Of uncertain etymology, first attested in mid-19th century Virginia. Possibly a variant of deck and deck out or influenced by them.

Verb

dike (third-person singular simple present dikes, present participle diking, simple past and past participle diked)

  1. (US dialect slang, obsolete) To be well dressed.
Derived terms
  • diked out
  • diked up

Noun

dike (plural dikes)

  1. (US dialect slang, obsolete) A well-dressed man.
  2. (US dialect slang, obsolete) Formalwear or other fashionable dress.
Derived terms
  • out on a dike

Etymology 3

See dyke.

Noun

dike (plural dikes)

  1. Alternative form of dyke: (slang, usually derogatory) a masculine woman; a lesbian.

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary. “dike, n.² and v.²“.
  • Oxford English Dictionary. “dike | dyke, n.³“.

Anagrams

  • IDEK, idek

Esperanto

Adverb

dike

  1. thickly

Lindu

Noun

dike

  1. dog

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse díki, from Proto-Germanic *dīkiją, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeygʷ- (whence also English ditch).

Noun

dike n

  1. ditch; a small canal, for irrigation or drainage
    Han körde i diket med sin nya bil.

    He went off the road with (ditched) his new car.

Usage notes

  • The phrase “köra i diket” (to ditch) is used also when there’s no ditch.

Declension

Related terms

  • dika
  • dika ut
  • dikesgrävning
  • dikeskant
  • dikeskörning
  • dikesren
  • dikning
  • köra i diket
  • täckdike
  • utdikning

References

  • dike in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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