butt vs fag what difference

what is difference between butt and fag

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General American) enPR: bŭt, IPA(key): /bʌt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌt
  • Homophone: but

Etymology 1

From Middle English but, butte (goal, mark, butt of land), from Old English byt, bytt (small piece of land) and *butt (attested in diminutive Old English buttuc (end, small piece of land) > English buttock), from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (end, piece), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰnós (bottom), later thematic variant of Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn ~ *bʰudʰn-, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (deep).

Cognate with Norwegian butt (stump, block), Icelandic bútur (piece, fragment), Low German butt (blunt, clumsy). Influenced by Old French but, butte (but, mark), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Compare also Albanian bythë (buttocks), Ancient Greek πυθμήν (puthmḗn, bottom of vessel), Latin fundus (bottom) and Sanskrit बुध्न (budhná, bottom), from the same Proto-Indo-European root. Related to bottom, boot.

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (countable) The larger or thicker end of something; the blunt end, in distinction from the sharp or narrow end
    1. (Canada, US, slang) The buttocks (used as a euphemism in idiomatic expressions; less objectionable than arse/ass).
      1. (slang) The whole buttocks and pelvic region that includes one’s private parts.
      2. (slang, metonymically) Body; self.
    2. (leather trades) The thickest and stoutest part of tanned oxhides, used for soles of boots, harness, trunks.
  2. (countable) The waste end of anything
    1. (slang) A used cigarette.
    2. A piece of land left unplowed at the end of a field.
      • c. 1850-1860, Alexander Mansfield Burrill, A New Law Dictionary and Glossary
        The hay was growing upon headlands and butts in cornfields.
    3. (obsolete, West Country) Hassock.
  3. (countable, generally) An end of something, often distinguished in some way from the other end.
    1. The end of a firearm opposite to that from which a bullet is fired.
    2. (lacrosse) The plastic or rubber cap used to cover the open end of a lacrosse stick’s shaft in order to reduce injury.
    3. The portion of a half-coupling fastened to the end of a hose.
    4. The end of a connecting rod or other like piece, to which the boxing is attached by the strap, cotter, and gib.
    5. (mechanical) A joint where the ends of two objects come squarely together without scarfing or chamfering.
      Synonym: butt joint
    6. (carpentry) A kind of hinge used in hanging doors, etc., so named because it is attached to the inside edge of the door and butts against the casing, instead of on its face, like the strap hinge; also called butt hinge.
    7. (shipbuilding) The joint where two planks in a strake meet.
    8. The blunt back part of an axehead or large blade. Also called the poll.
  4. (countable) A limit; a bound; a goal; the extreme bound; the end.
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act V, Scene II, line 267.
      Here is my journey’s end, here is my butt / And very sea-mark of my utmost sail.
    1. A mark to be shot at; a target.
      • 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act I, Scene II, line 186.
        To which is fixed, as an aim or butt
      • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 37.
        The inhabitants of all cities and towns were ordered to make butts, and to keep them in repair, under a penalty of twenty shillings per month, and to exercise themselves in shooting at them on holidays.
      • The groom his fellow groom at butts defies, / And bends his bow, and levels with his eyes.
    2. (usually as “butt of (a) joke”) A person at whom ridicule, jest, or contempt is directed.
      Synonym: laughing stock
      • I played a sentence or two at my butt, which I thought very smart.
    3. The hut or shelter of the person who attends to the targets in rifle practice.
Usage notes
  • “butt” for “buttocks” is considered less vulgar than “arse/ass”, but still not as polite as saying bottom or rear end.
Translations

Verb

butt (third-person singular simple present butts, present participle butting, simple past and past participle butted)

  1. To join at the butt, end, or outward extremity; to terminate; to be bounded; to abut.
    • And Barnsdale there doth butt on Don’s well-watered ground.
Derived terms
  • butt-weld, buttweld
Related terms
See also
  • (buttocks): callipygian, callipygous, dasypygal

Etymology 2

From Middle English butten, from Anglo-Norman buter, boter (to push, butt, strike), from Frankish *bautan (to hit, beat), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to beat, push), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to beat, push, strike). Cognate with Old English bēatan (to beat). More at beat.

Verb

butt (third-person singular simple present butts, present participle butting, simple past and past participle butted)

  1. (transitive) To strike bluntly, particularly with the head.
    • 1651, Henry Wotton, A Description of the Country’s Recreations
      Two harmless lambs are butting one the other.
  2. (intransitive) To strike bluntly with the head.
Related terms
Translations

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. A push, thrust, or sudden blow, given by the head; a head butt.
  2. A thrust in fencing.
    • To prove who gave the fairer butt, / John shows the chalk on Robert’s coat.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bit, bitte, bytte, butte (leather bottle), from Old English bytt, byt and Old French boute (cask) and other etymologies on this page.

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (English units) An English measure of capacity for liquids, containing 126 wine gallons which is one-half tun; equivalent to the pipe.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, p. 205.
      Again, by 28 Hen. VIII, cap. 14, it is re-enacted that the tun of wine should contain 252 gallons, a butt of Malmsey 126 gallons, a pipe 126 gallons, a tercian or puncheon 84 gallons, a hogshead 63 gallons, a tierce 41 gallons, a barrel 31.5 gallons, a rundlet 18.5 gallons. –
  2. A wooden cask for storing wine, usually containing 126 gallons.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act II, Scene II, line 121.
      …I escap’d upon a butt of sack which the sailors heav’d o’erboard…

Related terms

Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English but, butte, botte (flounder; plaice; turbot), possibly derived from sense 1 (blunt end), meaning “blunt-headed fish.” Compare Dutch bot and the second element of English halibut.

Cognate with West Frisian bot, German Low German Butt, German Butt, Butte, Swedish butta.

Alternative forms

  • but

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (Northern England) Any of various flatfish such as sole, plaice or turbot
Derived terms
  • halibut
Translations

Etymology 5

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (dated, West Country and Ireland) A heavy two-wheeled cart.
  2. (dated, West Country and Ireland) A three-wheeled cart resembling a wheelbarrow.
Derived terms

References

  • Wright, Joseph (1898) The English Dialect Dictionary[1], volume 1, Oxford: Oxford University Press, page 463–465

Further reading

  • butt at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • butt in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German butt, bott.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʉt/

Adjective

butt (neuter singular butt, definite singular and plural butte, comparative buttere, indefinite superlative buttest, definite superlative butteste)

  1. blunt (not sharp)
  2. (vinkel) obtuse (angle between 90 and 180 degrees)

References

  • “butt” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German butt, bott.

Adjective

butt (neuter singular butt, definite singular and plural butte, comparative buttare, indefinite superlative buttast, definite superlative buttaste)

  1. blunt (not sharp)
  2. (vinkel) obtuse (angle between 90 and 180 degrees)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

butt

  1. past participle of bu

References

  • “butt” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1

Probably from fag end (remnant), from Middle English fagge (flap).

Noun

fag (plural fags)

  1. (US, technical) In textile inspections, a rough or coarse defect in the woven fabric.
  2. (Britain, Ireland, Australia, colloquial, dated in US and Canada) A cigarette.
    • 1968 January 25, The Bulletin, Oregon,
      He′d Phase Out Fag Industry
      Los Angeles (UPI) – A UCLA professor has called for the phasing out of the cigarette industry by converting tobacco acres to other crops.
    • 2001, Oliver Sacks, Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood, Alfred A. Knopf (2001), 15,
      All of them, like my mother, were heavy smokers, and after warming themselves by the fire, they would sit on the sofa and smoke, lobbing their wet fag ends into the fire.
    • 2011, Bill Marsh, Great Australian Shearing Stories, unnumbered page,
      So I started off by asking the shearers if they minded if I took a belly off while they were having a fag. Then after a while they were asking me. They′d say, ‘Do yer wanta take over fer a bit while I have a fag?’ And then I got better and I′d finish the sheep and they′d say ‘Christ, I haven′t finished me bloody fag yet, yer may as well shear anotherie.’
  3. (Britain, obsolete, colloquial) The worst part or end of a thing.
Synonyms
  • (cigarette): ciggy (Australia, Britain), smoke, (Cockney rhyming slang) oily rag
Derived terms
  • fag end
  • fag packet
Translations

Etymology 2

Akin to flag (droop, tire). Compare Dutch vaak (sleepiness).

Noun

fag (plural fags)

  1. (Britain, dated, colloquial) A chore: an arduous and tiresome task.
    • 1818, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, 1992, Complete Works of Jane Austen, p. 123:
      We are sadly off in the country; not but what we have very good shops in Salisbury, but it is so far to go—eight miles is a long way; Mr. Allen says it is nine, measured nine; but I am sure it cannot be more than eight; and it is such a fag—I come back tired to death.
  2. (Britain, education, archaic, colloquial) A younger student acting as a servant for senior students.
    • 1791, Richard Cumberland, The Observer, Vol. 4, page 67:
      I had the character at ſchool of being the very beſt fag that ever came into it.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 18:
      A gang of fags was mobbing about by the notice-boards. They fell silent as he approached. He patted one of them on the head. ‘Pretty children,’ he sighed, digging into his waistcoat pocket and pulling out a handful of change. ‘Tonight you shall eat.’ Scattering the coins at their feet, he moved on.

Verb

fag (third-person singular simple present fags, present participle fagging, simple past and past participle fagged)

  1. (transitive, colloquial, used mainly in passive form) To make exhausted, tired out.
  2. (intransitive, colloquial) To droop; to tire.
    • a. 1829, G. Mackenzie, Lives, quoted in 1829, “Fag”, entry in The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary, Volume 9, page 12,
      Creighton with-held his force ’till the Italian began to fag, and then brought him to the ground.
  3. (intransitive, Britain, education, archaic, colloquial) For a younger student to act as a servant for senior students in many British boarding schools.
  4. (transitive, Britain, education, archaic, colloquial) To have (a younger student) act as a servant in this way.
  5. (intransitive, Britain, archaic) To work hard, especially on menial chores.

Derived terms

  • (to act as a servant): fagger, faggery, fagging (as a noun), fagmaster
  • (to tire): fagged out

Etymology 3

From faggot.

Noun

fag (plural fags)

  1. (chiefly US, Canada, vulgar, usually offensive, sometimes endearing) A homosexual man, especially (usually derogatory) an especially effeminate or unusual one.
    • 1921 John Lind, The Female Impersonators (Historical Documentation of American Slang v. 1, A-G, edited by Jonathan E. Lighter (New York: Random House, 1994) page 716.
      Androgynes known as “fairies,” “fags,” or “brownies.”
  2. (US, vulgar, offensive) An annoying person.
    Why did you do that, you fag?
Usage notes

In North America, fag is often considered highly offensive, although some gay people have tried to reclaim it. (Compare faggot.) The humorousness of derived terms fag hag and fag stag is sometimes considered to lessen their offensiveness.

Synonyms
  • (male homosexual): See Thesaurus:homosexual person
  • (annoying person): See Thesaurus:jerk
Derived terms
  • fag hag
  • fag stag
Translations

Anagrams

  • Afg., gaf

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • fagu, fau

Etymology

From Latin fāgus. Compare Romanian fag.

Noun

fag m (plural fadz)

  1. beech

Derived terms

  • fagã

Related terms

  • fãdzet

Danish

Etymology

From German Fach (compartment, drawer, subject), from Old High German fah (wall).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faːˀɣ/, [ˈfæˀj], [ˈfæˀ], IPA(key): [ˈfɑw-] (in derivatives)

Noun

fag n (singular definite faget, plural indefinite fag)

  1. subject (of study)
  2. trade, craft, profession
  3. bay (the distance between two vertical or horizontal supports in roofs and walls)

Derived terms

  • fagfelt
  • fagmand
  • faglig
  • faglitteratur
  • skolefag

Inflection


Icelandic

Etymology

Borrowed from Danish fag, itself a borrowing from German Fach.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [faːɣ]
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

fag n (genitive singular fags, nominative plural fög)

  1. subject (particular area of study)

Declension

Synonyms

  • (subject): námsgrein

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German or German Low German fak; compare with German Fach

Noun

fag n (definite singular faget, indefinite plural fag, definite plural faga or fagene)

  1. subject (e.g., at school)
  2. profession, trade, discipline

Derived terms

References

  • “fag” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German or German Low German fak; compare with German Fach

Noun

fag n (definite singular faget, indefinite plural fag, definite plural faga)

  1. subject (e.g., at school)
  2. profession, trade, discipline

Derived terms

References

  • “fag” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fak/

Noun

fag m anim

  1. phage

Declension


Romanian

Etymology 1

From Latin fāgus, from Proto-Italic *fāgos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵos (beech tree).

Noun

fag m (plural fagi)

  1. beech (tree of genus Fagus)
Declension
Related terms
  • făget

Etymology 2

From Latin favus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰōw- (to swell, grow, thrive, be, live, dwell).

Noun

fag n (plural faguri)

  1. (archaic) honeycomb
Synonyms
  • fagure

Welsh

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vaɡ/

Noun

fag

  1. Soft mutation of bag.

Mutation

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vaːɡ/

Noun

fag

  1. Soft mutation of mag.

Mutation

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