butt vs target what difference

what is difference between butt and target

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, General American) enPR: bŭt, IPA(key): /bʌt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌt
  • Homophone: but

Etymology 1

From Middle English but, butte (goal, mark, butt of land), from Old English byt, bytt (small piece of land) and *butt (attested in diminutive Old English buttuc (end, small piece of land) > English buttock), from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (end, piece), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰnós (bottom), later thematic variant of Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn ~ *bʰudʰn-, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (deep).

Cognate with Norwegian butt (stump, block), Icelandic bútur (piece, fragment), Low German butt (blunt, clumsy). Influenced by Old French but, butte (but, mark), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Compare also Albanian bythë (buttocks), Ancient Greek πυθμήν (puthmḗn, bottom of vessel), Latin fundus (bottom) and Sanskrit बुध्न (budhná, bottom), from the same Proto-Indo-European root. Related to bottom, boot.

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (countable) The larger or thicker end of something; the blunt end, in distinction from the sharp or narrow end
    1. (Canada, US, slang) The buttocks (used as a euphemism in idiomatic expressions; less objectionable than arse/ass).
      1. (slang) The whole buttocks and pelvic region that includes one’s private parts.
      2. (slang, metonymically) Body; self.
    2. (leather trades) The thickest and stoutest part of tanned oxhides, used for soles of boots, harness, trunks.
  2. (countable) The waste end of anything
    1. (slang) A used cigarette.
    2. A piece of land left unplowed at the end of a field.
      • c. 1850-1860, Alexander Mansfield Burrill, A New Law Dictionary and Glossary
        The hay was growing upon headlands and butts in cornfields.
    3. (obsolete, West Country) Hassock.
  3. (countable, generally) An end of something, often distinguished in some way from the other end.
    1. The end of a firearm opposite to that from which a bullet is fired.
    2. (lacrosse) The plastic or rubber cap used to cover the open end of a lacrosse stick’s shaft in order to reduce injury.
    3. The portion of a half-coupling fastened to the end of a hose.
    4. The end of a connecting rod or other like piece, to which the boxing is attached by the strap, cotter, and gib.
    5. (mechanical) A joint where the ends of two objects come squarely together without scarfing or chamfering.
      Synonym: butt joint
    6. (carpentry) A kind of hinge used in hanging doors, etc., so named because it is attached to the inside edge of the door and butts against the casing, instead of on its face, like the strap hinge; also called butt hinge.
    7. (shipbuilding) The joint where two planks in a strake meet.
    8. The blunt back part of an axehead or large blade. Also called the poll.
  4. (countable) A limit; a bound; a goal; the extreme bound; the end.
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act V, Scene II, line 267.
      Here is my journey’s end, here is my butt / And very sea-mark of my utmost sail.
    1. A mark to be shot at; a target.
      • 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act I, Scene II, line 186.
        To which is fixed, as an aim or butt
      • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 37.
        The inhabitants of all cities and towns were ordered to make butts, and to keep them in repair, under a penalty of twenty shillings per month, and to exercise themselves in shooting at them on holidays.
      • The groom his fellow groom at butts defies, / And bends his bow, and levels with his eyes.
    2. (usually as “butt of (a) joke”) A person at whom ridicule, jest, or contempt is directed.
      Synonym: laughing stock
      • I played a sentence or two at my butt, which I thought very smart.
    3. The hut or shelter of the person who attends to the targets in rifle practice.
Usage notes
  • “butt” for “buttocks” is considered less vulgar than “arse/ass”, but still not as polite as saying bottom or rear end.
Translations

Verb

butt (third-person singular simple present butts, present participle butting, simple past and past participle butted)

  1. To join at the butt, end, or outward extremity; to terminate; to be bounded; to abut.
    • And Barnsdale there doth butt on Don’s well-watered ground.
Derived terms
  • butt-weld, buttweld
Related terms
See also
  • (buttocks): callipygian, callipygous, dasypygal

Etymology 2

From Middle English butten, from Anglo-Norman buter, boter (to push, butt, strike), from Frankish *bautan (to hit, beat), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to beat, push), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰewd- (to beat, push, strike). Cognate with Old English bēatan (to beat). More at beat.

Verb

butt (third-person singular simple present butts, present participle butting, simple past and past participle butted)

  1. (transitive) To strike bluntly, particularly with the head.
    • 1651, Henry Wotton, A Description of the Country’s Recreations
      Two harmless lambs are butting one the other.
  2. (intransitive) To strike bluntly with the head.
Related terms
Translations

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. A push, thrust, or sudden blow, given by the head; a head butt.
  2. A thrust in fencing.
    • To prove who gave the fairer butt, / John shows the chalk on Robert’s coat.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bit, bitte, bytte, butte (leather bottle), from Old English bytt, byt and Old French boute (cask) and other etymologies on this page.

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (English units) An English measure of capacity for liquids, containing 126 wine gallons which is one-half tun; equivalent to the pipe.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, p. 205.
      Again, by 28 Hen. VIII, cap. 14, it is re-enacted that the tun of wine should contain 252 gallons, a butt of Malmsey 126 gallons, a pipe 126 gallons, a tercian or puncheon 84 gallons, a hogshead 63 gallons, a tierce 41 gallons, a barrel 31.5 gallons, a rundlet 18.5 gallons. –
  2. A wooden cask for storing wine, usually containing 126 gallons.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act II, Scene II, line 121.
      …I escap’d upon a butt of sack which the sailors heav’d o’erboard…

Related terms

Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English but, butte, botte (flounder; plaice; turbot), possibly derived from sense 1 (blunt end), meaning “blunt-headed fish.” Compare Dutch bot and the second element of English halibut.

Cognate with West Frisian bot, German Low German Butt, German Butt, Butte, Swedish butta.

Alternative forms

  • but

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (Northern England) Any of various flatfish such as sole, plaice or turbot
Derived terms
  • halibut
Translations

Etymology 5

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

butt (plural butts)

  1. (dated, West Country and Ireland) A heavy two-wheeled cart.
  2. (dated, West Country and Ireland) A three-wheeled cart resembling a wheelbarrow.
Derived terms

References

  • Wright, Joseph (1898) The English Dialect Dictionary[1], volume 1, Oxford: Oxford University Press, page 463–465

Further reading

  • butt at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • butt in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Middle Low German butt, bott.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʉt/

Adjective

butt (neuter singular butt, definite singular and plural butte, comparative buttere, indefinite superlative buttest, definite superlative butteste)

  1. blunt (not sharp)
  2. (vinkel) obtuse (angle between 90 and 180 degrees)

References

  • “butt” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German butt, bott.

Adjective

butt (neuter singular butt, definite singular and plural butte, comparative buttare, indefinite superlative buttast, definite superlative buttaste)

  1. blunt (not sharp)
  2. (vinkel) obtuse (angle between 90 and 180 degrees)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

butt

  1. past participle of bu

References

  • “butt” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Etymology

From Middle French targette, targuete, diminutive of targe (light shield), from Old French, from Frankish *targa (buckler), akin to Old Norse targa (small round shield) (whence also Old English targe, targa (shield)) from Proto-Germanic *targǭ (edge), from Proto-Indo-European *derǵʰ- (fenced lot). Akin to Old High German zarga (side wall, rim) (German Zarge (frame)), Spanish tarjeta (card).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈtɑɹɡɪt/, [ˈtʰɑɹɡɪt̚]
  • (UK) IPA(key): /tɑːɡɪt/

Noun

target (plural targets)

  1. A butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile.
  2. A goal or objective.
  3. A kind of small shield or buckler, used as a defensive weapon in war.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part I, Act II, Scene IV, line 200,
      These four came all afront, and mainly thrust at me. I made me no more ado but took all their seven points in my target, thus.
  4. (obsolete) A shield resembling the Roman scutum, larger than the modern buckler.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 22,
      The target or buckler was carried by the heavy armed foot, it answered to the scutum of the Romans; its form was sometimes that of a rectangular parallelogram, but more commonly had its bottom rounded off; it was generally convex, being curved in its breadth.
  5. (heraldry) A bearing representing a buckler.
  6. (sports) The pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark.
  7. (surveying) The sliding crosspiece, or vane, on a leveling staff.
  8. (rail transport) A conspicuous disk attached to a switch lever to show its position, or for use as a signal.
  9. (cricket) the number of runs that the side batting last needs to score in the final innings in order to win
  10. (linguistics) The tenor of a metaphor.
  11. (translation studies) The translated version of a document, or the language into which translation occurs.
  12. A person (or group of people) that a person or organization is trying to employ or to have as a customer, audience etc.
  13. (Britain, dated) A thin cut; a slice; specifically, of lamb, a piece consisting of the neck and breast joints.
  14. (Scotland, obsolete) A tassel or pendant.
  15. (Scotland, obsolete) A shred; a tatter.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:goal
  • (translated version): target language

Coordinate terms

  • (translated version): source

Meronyms

  • (sport): bull/bullseye, inner, magpie, outer

Derived terms

  • targeteer
  • targeter
  • targeting

Descendants

  • Japanese: ターゲット (tāgetto)

Translations

Verb

target (third-person singular simple present targets, present participle targeting or targetting, simple past and past participle targeted or targetted)

  1. (transitive) To aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target).
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To aim for as an audience or demographic.
    The advertising campaign targeted older women.
  3. (transitive, computing) To produce code suitable for.
    This cross-platform compiler can target any of several processors.

Translations

See also

  • Target on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Gretta, gatter

Cebuano

Etymology

From English target.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: tar‧get

Noun

target

  1. a butt or mark to shoot at, as for practice, or to test the accuracy of a firearm, or the force of a projectile
  2. a goal or objective
  3. (sports) the pattern or arrangement of a series of hits made by a marksman on a butt or mark
  4. a shot of tuba

Verb

target

  1. to aim something, especially a weapon, at (a target)
  2. to hurl something at a target
  3. to impale with a projectile weapon

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:target.


Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

target n (plural targets, diminutive targetje n)

  1. target

Indonesian

Etymology

From English target.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtarɡɛt̚/
  • Hyphenation: tar‧gèt

Noun

targèt (first-person possessive targetku, second-person possessive targetmu, third-person possessive targetnya)

  1. target: a goal or objective.
    Synonym: sasaran

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “target” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Spanish

Etymology

From English target.

Noun

target m (plural targets)

  1. target (goal, objective)

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