button vs push what difference

what is difference between button and push

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈbʌtn̩/, /ˈbʌtən/, [ˈbʌʔn̩], [ˈbʌʔtⁿn̩]
  • Rhymes: -ʌtən

Etymology 1

From Middle English boton, botoun, from Old French boton (Modern French bouton), from Old French bouter, boter (to push; thrust), ultimately from a Germanic language. More at butt.

Noun

button (plural buttons)

  1. A knob or disc that is passed through a loop or (buttonhole), serving as a fastener. [from the mid-13th c.]
  2. A mechanical device meant to be pressed with a finger in order to open or close an electric circuit or to activate a mechanism.
  3. (graphical user interface) An on-screen control that can be selected as an activator of an attached function.
  4. (US) A badge worn on clothes, fixed with a pin through the fabric.
  5. (botany) A bud.
  6. The head of an unexpanded mushroom.
  7. (slang) The clitoris.
  8. (curling) The center (bullseye) of the house.
  9. (fencing) The soft circular tip at the end of a foil.
  10. (poker) A plastic disk used to represent the person in last position in a poker game; also dealer’s button.
  11. (poker) The player who is last to act after the flop, turn and river, who possesses the button.
  12. (archaic) A person who acts as a decoy.
  13. A raised pavement marker to further indicate the presence of a pavement-marking painted stripe.
  14. (aviation) The end of a runway.
    • 1984, Synopses of Aircraft Accidents: Civil Aircraft in Canada (page 42)
      In attempting to touch down on the button of the runway, he misjudged his altitude and struck a pile of rocks short of the runway. The right wheel was torn off and the gear leg bent backwards.
    • 1999, Les Morrison, Of Luck and War (page 69)
      The second and slightly higher aircraft on the approach showed no reaction to this barrage of pyrotechnics and continued blissfully down toward the button of the runway.
  15. (South Africa, slang) A methaqualone tablet (used as a recreational drug).
  16. A piece of wood or metal, usually flat and elongated, turning on a nail or screw, to fasten something, such as a door.
  17. A globule of metal remaining on an assay cupel or in a crucible, after fusion.
  18. A knob; a small ball; a small, roundish mass.
  19. A small white blotch on a cat’s coat.
  20. (Britain, archaic) A unit of length equal to 112 inch.
  21. The means for initiating a nuclear strike or similar cataclysmic occurrence.
  22. (lutherie) In an instrument of the violin family, the near-semicircular shape extending from the top of the back plate of the instrument, meeting the heel of the neck.
  23. (lutherie) Synonym of endbutton, part of a violin-family instrument.
  24. (lutherie, bowmaking) Synonym of adjuster.
  25. The least amount of care or interest; a whit or jot.
  26. (comedy) The final joke at the end of a comedic act (such as a sketch, set, or scene).
  27. (slang) A button man; a professional assassin.
    • 1973, Mario Puzo, Francis Ford Coppola, The Godfather Part II (screenplay, second draft)
      FREDO: Mikey, why would they ever hit poor old Frankie Five-Angels? I loved that ole sonuvabitch. I remember when he was just a ‘button,’ when we were kids.
  28. The final segment of a rattlesnake’s rattle.
Usage notes

For the senses 2 and 3, a button is often marked by a verb rather than a noun, and the button itself is called with the verb and button. For example, a button to start something is generally called start button.

Hypernyms
  • (graphical user interface): widget
Hyponyms
Derived terms

Descendants

  • Hindi: बटन (baṭan)
  • Gujarati: બટન (baṭan)
  • Korean: 버튼 (beoteun)
  • Maori: pātene
  • Urdu: بٹن(baṭan)
Translations
See also
  • switch
  • toggle
  • trigger

Etymology 2

From Middle English butonen, botonen, from the noun (see above).

Verb

button (third-person singular simple present buttons, present participle buttoning, simple past and past participle buttoned)

  1. (transitive) To fasten with a button. [from the late 14th c.]
    • He was a tall, fat, long-bodied man, buttoned up to the throat in a tight green coat.
  2. (intransitive) To be fastened by a button or buttons.
  3. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (informal) To stop talking.
Derived terms
  • buttonable
  • button-down
  • buttoner
  • button one’s lip
  • button up
  • button it
  • misbutton
  • rebutton
  • unbutton
Translations

Further reading

  • button on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • not but

Middle English

Noun

button

  1. Alternative form of botoun


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English pushen, poshen, posson, borrowed from Middle French pousser (Modern French pousser) from Old French poulser, from Latin pulsare, frequentative of pellere (past participle pulsus) “to beat, strike”. Doublet of pulsate. Displaced native Middle English thrucchen (“to push”; > Modern English thrutch) (from Old English þryccan (to push)), Middle English scauten (to push, thrust) (from Old Norse skota), Middle English thuden, thudden (to push, press, thrust) (from Old English þȳdan, þyddan (to thrust, press, push)). Partially displaced Middle English schoven (to push, shove) (from Old English scofian), Middle English schuven (to shove, push) (from Old English scūfan, scēofan (to shove, push, thrust))

Pronunciation

  • enPR: po͝osh, IPA(key): /pʊʃ/
  • (Appalachian) IPA(key): [puʃ]
  • IPA(key): [pʷʊʃ]
  • Rhymes: -ʊʃ

Verb

push (third-person singular simple present pushes, present participle pushing, simple past and past participle pushed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force.
  2. (transitive) To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action.
    • December 7, 1710, Jonathan Swift, The Examiner, Number 18
      We are pushed for an answer.
    • December 22, 1711, letter to The Spectator
      Ambition [] pushes the soul to such actions as are apt to procure honour and reputation to the actor.
  3. (transitive) To press or urge forward; to drive.
    • to push his fortune
  4. (transitive) To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.).
  5. (intransitive) To continually exert oneself in order to achieve a goal.
  6. (informal, transitive) To approach; to come close to.
    (= he’s nearly sixty years old)
  7. (intransitive) To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  8. (intransitive) To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action.
  9. To make a higher bid at an auction.
  10. (poker) To make an all-in bet.
  11. (chess, transitive) To move (a pawn) directly forward.
  12. (computing) To add (a data item) to the top of a stack.
  13. (computing) To publish (an update, etc.) by transmitting it to other computers.
  14. (obsolete) To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.
    • If the ox shall push a manservant or maidservant, [] the ox shall be stoned.
  15. To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot.
  16. (snooker) To strike the cue ball in such a way that it stays in contact with the cue and object ball at the same time (a foul shot).
Synonyms
  • (transitive: apply a force to (an object) so it moves away): press, shove, thrutch
  • (continue to attempt to persuade): press, urge
  • (continue to promote): press, advertise, promote
  • (come close to): approach, near
  • (intransitive: apply force to an object so that it moves away): press, shove, thring
  • (tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents): bear down
Antonyms
  • (apply a force to something so it moves away): draw, pull, tug
  • (put onto a stack): pop
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • pedal pushers
  • push it
Translations

Noun

push (countable and uncountable, plural pushes)

  1. A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing.
  2. An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents.
  3. A great effort (to do something).
  4. An attempt to persuade someone into a particular course of action.
  5. (military) A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music.
  6. A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score
  7. (computing) The addition of a data item to the top of a stack.
  8. (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request.
  9. (slang, Britain, obsolete, now chiefly Australia) A particular crowd or throng or people.
    • 1891, Banjo Paterson, An Evening in Dandaloo
      Till some wild, excited person
      Galloped down the township cursing,
      “Sydney push have mobbed Macpherson,
      Roll up, Dandaloo!”
    • 1994, David Malouf, A First Place, Vintage 2015, p. 37:
      My father [] was soon as unambiguously Australian as any other member of the rough Rugby pushes that in the years before the Great War made up the mixed and liverly world of South Brisbane.
  10. (snooker) A foul shot in which the cue ball is in contact with the cue and the object ball at the same time
Derived terms
  • give someone the push
  • push factor
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably French poche. See pouch.

Pronunciation

Noun

push (plural pushes)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) A pustule; a pimple.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Praise
      a Push rise upon his Nose

References

  • push in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • push at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • PHUs, Phus, shup

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *puša, from *puksja, from Proto-Indo-European *pewk- (covered with hair, bushy). Related to Sanskrit पुच्छ (púccha, tail), Proto-Slavic *puxъ (down).

Noun

push m (indefinite plural pusha, definite singular pushi, definite plural pushat)

  1. light hair, fluff, down, nap, pile

References


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