buttonhole vs lobby what difference

what is difference between buttonhole and lobby

English

Alternative forms

  • button-hole, button hole

Etymology

Originally buttonhold (a loop of string to hold a button down), but changed by folk etymology by influence of hole; see the Wikipedia article on folk etymology

Pronunciation

Noun

buttonhole (plural buttonholes)

  1. A hole through which a button is pushed to secure a garment or some part of one.
  2. (chiefly Britain) A flower worn in a buttonhole for decoration.
    Synonym: boutonniere
    1. (attributive) So shaped that it can be worn on a buttonhole or it is similar to a buttonhole.
  3. (surgery) A small slot-like cut or incision, made for example by an accident with the scalpel.
    • 2011, George L. Spaeth, Helen Danesh-Meyer, Ivan Goldberg, Ophthalmic Surgery: Principles and Practice E-Book (page 220)
      The usual cause of conjunctival buttonholes is penetration of the tissue by the tip of a sharp instrument []
  4. The mouth and/or nose and/or eyes if appearing tiny.
  5. (obsolete) vagina, coin slot.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:vagina
  6. (lightly vulgar) anus, batty hole.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:anus

Translations

Verb

buttonhole (third-person singular simple present buttonholes, present participle buttonholing, simple past and past participle buttonholed)

  1. (transitive, colloquial) To detain (a person) in conversation against their will.
    Synonyms: accost, waylay
    • 1880, Mark Twain, A Tramp Abroad, Chapter 26,[1]
      He backed Mr. Lykins against an iron fence, buttonholed him, fastened him with his eye, like the Ancient Mariner, and proceeded to unfold his narrative as placidly and peacefully as if we were all stretched comfortably in a blossomy summer meadow instead of being persecuted by a wintry midnight tempest:
    • 1936, Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind, New York: Macmillan, Part 5, Chapter 50, p. 890,[2]
      He buttonholed people on the street and related details of his child’s miraculous progress without even prefacing his remarks with the hypocritical but polite: “I know everyone thinks their own child is smart but—”
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To cut one or more buttonholes (in).
  3. (transitive) To sew by buttonhole stitch.
  4. (transitive, surgery, chiefly archaic) To make a small slot-like incision in (intentionally or unintentionally).
  5. (transitive, rare) To apply a flowery formation in.
  6. (intransitive, archaic, rare) To attain buttonhole-like formations on cutting.

Derived terms

  • buttonholer

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /lɒbi/
    • Rhymes: -ɒbi
  • (US) IPA(key): /lɑbi/

Etymology 1

From Old French *lobie, from Medieval Latin lobium, lobia, laubia (a portico, covered way, gallery), borrowed from Frankish *laubijā (arbour, shelter), from Proto-Indo-European *lewbʰ- (to break off, peel, damage). Related to Old English lēaf (foliage). More at leaf. Doublet of loggia

Political sense derives from the entrance hall of legislatures, where people traditionally tried to influence legislators because it was the most convenient place to meet them.

Noun

lobby (plural lobbies)

  1. An entryway or reception area; vestibule; passageway; corridor.
    I had to wait in the lobby for hours before seeing the doctor.
  2. That part of a hall of legislation not appropriated to the official use of the assembly.
  3. A class or group of people who try to influence public officials; collectively, lobbyists.
    The influence of the tobacco lobby has decreased considerably in the US.
  4. (video games) A virtual area where players can chat and find opponents for a game.
  5. (nautical) An apartment or passageway in the fore part of an old-fashioned cabin under the quarter-deck.
  6. A confined place for cattle, formed by hedges, trees, or other fencing, near the farmyard.
  7. A margin along either side of the playing field in the sport of kabaddi.
  8. (when preceded by “elevator”) A waiting area in front of a bank of elevators.
Derived terms
  • gun lobby
  • lobbier
  • lobbyism
  • lobbyist
Descendants
Translations

Verb

lobby (third-person singular simple present lobbies, present participle lobbying, simple past and past participle lobbied)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) To attempt to influence (a public official or decision-maker) in favor of a specific opinion or cause.
    For years, pro-life groups have continued to lobby hard for restrictions on abortion.
    • 2002, Jim Hightower, in Wikiquote
      The corporations don’t have to lobby the government anymore. They are the government.
    • 2011 Allen Gregory, “Pilot” (season 1, episode 1):
      Allen Gregory DeLongpre: Yeah, it’s not a big deal. I lobbied for fuel-cell technology on Capitol Hill. I’m friends with Sandy Bullock, really good friends. Who cares? It’s not a pissing contest, right, J?
Related terms
  • lobbying
  • lobbyist
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

lobby (uncountable)

  1. (informal) scouse (from lobscouse)
    • My mam cooked us lobby for tea last night.

Further reading

  • lobby in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • lobby in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • lobby at OneLook Dictionary Search

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English lobby.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔ.bi/

Noun

lobby m (plural lobbies)

  1. lobby (hall)
  2. lobby (advocacy group)

Synonyms

  • (advocacy group): groupe de pression

Further reading

  • “lobby” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English lobby.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔb.bi/

Noun

lobby f (invariable)

  1. lobby (group of people; hall of a bank)

Derived terms

  • lobbista

Further reading

  • lobby in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Polish

Etymology

From English lobby.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔb.bɨ/

Noun

lobby n (indeclinable)

  1. (politics) lobby (group of people who try to lobby)

Derived terms

  • (verb) lobbować
  • (nouns) lobbista, lobbysta, lobbing
  • (adjectives) lobbistyczny, lobbystyczny

Further reading

  • lobby in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • lobby in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English lobby.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈlɔ.bi/

Noun

lobby m (plural lobbies or lobbys (rare))

  1. (politics) lobby (group of people who try to influence public officials)
  2. lobby (reception area of a large building)
  3. (Internet) lobby (virtual area where users find other users to a start a private conversation or video-game match with)

Synonyms

  • lóbi (uncommon)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English lobby. Doublet of lonja.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlobi/, [ˈlo.β̞i]

Noun

lobby m (plural lobbys)

  1. lobby (group of people who try to influence public officials)

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