buy vs corrupt what difference

what is difference between buy and corrupt

English

Etymology

From Middle English bien, biggen, buggen, from Old English bycġan (to buy, pay for, acquire, redeem, ransom, procure, get done, sell), from Proto-West Germanic *buggjan, from Proto-Germanic *bugjaną (to buy), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (to bend), or from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeugʰ- (to take away, deliver).

Cognate with Scots by (to buy, purchase), obsolete Dutch beugen (to buy), Old Saxon buggian, buggean (to buy), Old Norse byggja (to procure a wife, lend at interest, let out), Gothic ???????????????????????? (bugjan, to buy). The spelling with “u” is from the Southwest, while the pronunciation with /aɪ/ is from the East Midlands.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /baɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophones: bi, bye, by

Verb

buy (third-person singular simple present buys, present participle buying, simple past bought, past participle bought or (rare, dialectal) boughten)

  1. (transitive) To obtain (something) in exchange for money or goods
    • 1793, Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography
      Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou wilt sell thy necessaries.
  2. (transitive) To obtain, especially by some sacrifice.
  3. (transitive) To bribe.
  4. (transitive) To be equivalent to in value.
  5. (transitive, informal) to accept as true; to believe
  6. (intransitive) To make a purchase or purchases, to treat (for a drink, meal or gift)
  7. (poker slang, transitive) To make a bluff, usually a large one.

Alternative forms

  • buie (archaic)

Synonyms

  • (obtain in exchange for money): cheap (obsolete), purchase
  • (accept as true): accept, believe, swallow (informal), take on
  • ((intransitive) make a purchase): make a buy

Antonyms

  • (obtain in exchange for money): cheap (obsolete), sell, vend
  • (accept as true): disbelieve, reject, pitch

Derived terms

Related terms

  • aby

Translations

Noun

buy (plural buys)

  1. Something which is bought; a purchase.

Antonyms

  • sale

Derived terms

  • buydown
  • buyout
  • impulse buy

Translations

References

  • buy in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • buy in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • BYU

Tatar

Noun

buy

  1. length

Wolof

Noun

buy

  1. A baobab fruit.


English

Alternative forms

  • corrumpt (archaic)
  • corrump (obsolete)
  • corroupt (rare)

Etymology

From Middle English corrupten, derived from Latin corruptus, past participle of corrumpō, corrumpere (to destroy, ruin, injure, spoil, corrupt, bribe), from com- (together) + rumpere (to break in pieces).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəˈɹʌpt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌpt

Adjective

corrupt (comparative more corrupt, superlative most corrupt)

  1. In a depraved state; debased; perverted; morally degenerate; weak in morals.
    The government here is corrupt, so we’ll emigrate to escape them.
    • The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence.
    • At what ease
      Might corrupt minds procure knaves as corrupt
      To swear against you.
  2. Abounding in errors; not genuine or correct; in an invalid state.
    The text of the manuscript is corrupt.
    It turned out that the program was corrupt – that’s why it wouldn’t open.
  3. In a putrid state; spoiled; tainted; vitiated; unsound.
    • with such corrupt and pestilent bread to feed them.

Usage notes

  • Nouns to which “corrupt” is often applied: practice, state, country, nation, regime, city, government, person, man, politician, leader, mayor, judge, member, minister, file, database, document, woman.

Synonyms

  • corrupted

Translations

Verb

corrupt (third-person singular simple present corrupts, present participle corrupting, simple past and past participle corrupted)

  1. (transitive) To make corrupt; to change from good to bad; to draw away from the right path; to deprave; to pervert.
    • And God looked upon the earth, and, behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth.
  2. (archaic, intransitive) To become putrid, tainted, or otherwise impure; to putrefy; to rot.
    • he entrails, which are the parts aptest to corrupt
  3. (transitive) To introduce errors; to place into an invalid state.
  4. To debase or make impure by alterations or additions; to falsify.
  5. To waste, spoil, or consume; to make worthless.
    • Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt.

Translations

Related terms

  • corruptible
  • corruption
  • incorruptible

References

  • corrupt in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • corrupt in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin corruptus or from Middle French corrupt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔˈrʏpt/
  • Hyphenation: cor‧rupt
  • Rhymes: -ʏpt

Adjective

corrupt (comparative corrupter, superlative corruptst)

  1. corrupt (lacking integrity, being prone to discriminating, open to bribes, etc.)
  2. (textual criticism) corrupt (containing (many) errors)
  3. deprave, morally corrupt

Inflection

Related terms

  • corrumperen
  • corruptie

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: korrup
  • Indonesian: korup
  • West Frisian: korrupt

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin corruptus.

Adjective

corrupt m (feminine singular corrupte, masculine plural corrupts, feminine plural corruptes)

  1. corrupt (impure; not in its original form)

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