buy vs purchase what difference

what is difference between buy and purchase

English

Etymology

From Middle English bien, biggen, buggen, from Old English bycġan (to buy, pay for, acquire, redeem, ransom, procure, get done, sell), from Proto-West Germanic *buggjan, from Proto-Germanic *bugjaną (to buy), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (to bend), or from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeugʰ- (to take away, deliver).

Cognate with Scots by (to buy, purchase), obsolete Dutch beugen (to buy), Old Saxon buggian, buggean (to buy), Old Norse byggja (to procure a wife, lend at interest, let out), Gothic ???????????????????????? (bugjan, to buy). The spelling with “u” is from the Southwest, while the pronunciation with /aɪ/ is from the East Midlands.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /baɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Homophones: bi, bye, by

Verb

buy (third-person singular simple present buys, present participle buying, simple past bought, past participle bought or (rare, dialectal) boughten)

  1. (transitive) To obtain (something) in exchange for money or goods
    • 1793, Benjamin Franklin, Autobiography
      Buy what thou hast no need of, and ere long thou wilt sell thy necessaries.
  2. (transitive) To obtain, especially by some sacrifice.
  3. (transitive) To bribe.
  4. (transitive) To be equivalent to in value.
  5. (transitive, informal) to accept as true; to believe
  6. (intransitive) To make a purchase or purchases, to treat (for a drink, meal or gift)
  7. (poker slang, transitive) To make a bluff, usually a large one.

Alternative forms

  • buie (archaic)

Synonyms

  • (obtain in exchange for money): cheap (obsolete), purchase
  • (accept as true): accept, believe, swallow (informal), take on
  • ((intransitive) make a purchase): make a buy

Antonyms

  • (obtain in exchange for money): cheap (obsolete), sell, vend
  • (accept as true): disbelieve, reject, pitch

Derived terms

Related terms

  • aby

Translations

Noun

buy (plural buys)

  1. Something which is bought; a purchase.

Antonyms

  • sale

Derived terms

  • buydown
  • buyout
  • impulse buy

Translations

References

  • buy in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • buy in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • BYU

Tatar

Noun

buy

  1. length

Wolof

Noun

buy

  1. A baobab fruit.


English

Etymology

From Middle English purchasen, from Anglo-Norman purchacer (seek to obtain) from pur- (from Latin pro-) + chac(i)er (to chase, pursue). Compare Old French porchacier (to follow, to chase), which has given French pourchasser (to chase without relent).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpɝtʃəs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɜːtʃəs/
  • Hyphenation: pur‧chase

Noun

purchase (countable and uncountable, plural purchases)

  1. The acquisition of title to, or property in, anything for a price; buying for money or its equivalent.
  2. That which is obtained, got or acquired, in any manner, honestly or dishonestly; property; possession; acquisition.
  3. That which is obtained for a price in money or its equivalent.
  4. (obsolete) The act or process of seeking and obtaining something (e.g. property, etc.)
    • I’ll [] get meat to save thee, / Or lose my life i’ th’ purchase.
  5. A price paid for a house or estate, etc. equal to the amount of the rent or income during the stated number of years.
    • 1848, The Sessional Papers printed by order of the House of Lords
      Suppose a freehold house to be worth 20 years’ purchase []
  6. (uncountable, also figuratively) Any mechanical hold or advantage, applied to the raising or removing of heavy bodies, as by a lever, a tackle or capstan.
    Synonyms: contact, grip, hold
  7. The apparatus, tackle or device by which such mechanical advantage is gained and in nautical terminology the ratio of such a device, like a pulley, or block and tackle.
  8. (rock climbing, uncountable) The amount of hold one has from an individual foothold or ledge.
    Synonyms: foothold, support
  9. (law, dated) Acquisition of lands or tenements by means other than descent or inheritance, namely, by one’s own act or agreement.

Derived terms

  • purchase order
  • repurchase

Translations

Verb

purchase (third-person singular simple present purchases, present participle purchasing, simple past and past participle purchased)

  1. To buy, obtain by payment of a price in money or its equivalent.
  2. To pursue and obtain; to acquire by seeking; to gain, obtain, or acquire.
    • that loves the thing he cannot purchase
  3. To obtain by any outlay, as of labor, danger, or sacrifice, etc.
  4. To expiate by a fine or forfeit.
  5. To apply to (anything) a device for obtaining a mechanical advantage; to get a purchase upon, or apply a purchase to; to raise or move by mechanical means.
  6. To put forth effort to obtain anything; to strive; to exert oneself.
    • 1523–1525, John Bourchier, 2nd Baron Berners, Froissart’s Chronicles
      Duke John of Brabant purchased greatly that the Earl of Flanders should have his daughter in marriage.
  7. To constitute the buying power for a purchase, have a trading value.

Synonyms

  • (buy): procure

Derived terms

  • purchasable
  • purchasing agent
  • purchasing power

Translations

Anagrams

  • search up

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial