cadge vs scrounge what difference

what is difference between cadge and scrounge

English

Etymology

Possibly a corruption of cage, from Old French.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kædʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ædʒ

Noun

cadge (plural cadges)

  1. (falconry) A circular frame on which cadgers carry hawks for sale.

Translations

Verb

cadge (third-person singular simple present cadges, present participle cadging or cadgin, simple past and past participle cadged)

  1. (Tyneside) To beg.
  2. (US, Britain, slang) To obtain something by wit or guile; to convince people to do something they might not normally do.
    Synonyms: scrounge, bum; see also Thesaurus:scrounge
    • 1956, James Baldwin, Giovanni’s Room, Penguin, 2001, Part One, Chapter 2,
      They moved about the bar incessantly, cadging cigarettes and drinks, with something behind their eyes at once terribly vulnerable and terribly hard.
    • 1960, Lionel Bart, “Food, Glorious Food,” song from the musical Oliver!
      There’s not a crust, not a crumb can we find,
      can we beg, can we borrow, or cadge []
  3. To carry hawks and other birds of prey.
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:cadge.
  4. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) To carry, as a burden.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  5. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) To hawk or peddle, as fish, poultry, etc.
  6. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) To intrude or live on another meanly; to beg.
    • 1839, Glasgow Society, Report for Repressing Juvenile Delinquency
      Cadging on the fly is a profitable occupation in the vicinity of bathing places, and large towns. A person of this description frequently gets many shillings in the course of the day

Translations

Derived terms

  • cadger
  • codger

Translations

References

  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • Michael Quinion (15 January 2005), “Cadge”, in World Wide Words.

Anagrams

  • CAGED, caged


English

Etymology

1915, alteration of dialectal scrunge (“to search stealthily, rummage, pilfer”) (1909), of uncertain origin, perhaps from dialectal scringe (“to pry about”); or perhaps related to scrouge, scrooge (“push, jostle”) (1755, also Cockney slang for “a crowd”), probably suggestive of screw, squeeze. Popularized by the military in World War I.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skɹaʊndʒ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊndʒ

Verb

scrounge (third-person singular simple present scrounges, present participle scrounging, simple past and past participle scrounged)

  1. To hunt about, especially for something of nominal value; to scavenge or glean.
    • 1965, Bob Dylan, “Like a Rolling Stone”
      Now you don’t seem so proud about having to be scrounging your next meal.
  2. To obtain something of moderate or inconsequential value from another.
    As long as he’s got someone who’ll let him scrounge off them, he’ll never settle down and get a full-time job.

Synonyms

  • (obtain from another): blag, cadge (UK), leech, sponge, wheedle

Derived terms

  • scrounger

Translations

Noun

scrounge (plural scrounges)

  1. Someone who scrounges; a scrounger.

Translations

See also

  • scringe
  • scrooge
  • scrouge
  • scrunge

Anagrams

  • congrues

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