caitiff vs cur what difference

what is difference between caitiff and cur

English

Etymology

From Middle English caitif, from Anglo-Norman caitif (captive), akin to Old French chaitif (French chétif) and Middle Dutch keytyf, from a Vulgar Latin alteration of Latin captīvus (captive); compare Italian cattivo (bad, wicked). Doublet of captive.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkeɪtɪf/

Noun

caitiff (plural caitiffs)

  1. A base or despicable person; a wretch
    • 1989, Anthony Burgess, The Devil’s Mode
      ‘There are plenty of Huns who have defected to the Romans, seeking gold and a quiet life. One of my first tasks as paramount chief is to bring those caitiffs back and crucify them.’
  2. (obsolete) A captive or prisoner, particularly a galley slave
  3. (archaic) A villain, a coward or wretch

Adjective

caitiff (comparative more caitiff, superlative most caitiff)

  1. Especially despicable; cowardly
    • 1867, Dante Alighieri, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (translator), The Divine Comedy,
      Commingled are they with that caitiff choir

      Of Angels, who have not rebellious been,
      Nor faithful were to God, but were for self.
    • Hath Faith become a caitiff knave,
      And Selfhood turned into a slave

      To work in Mammon’s cave,

      Fair Lady?


English

Etymology

From Middle English kur, curre, of Middle Low German [Term?] or North Germanic origin. Compare Middle Dutch corre (house dog; watch-dog), dialectal Swedish kurre (a dog). Compare also Old Norse kurra (to growl; grumble), Middle Low German korren (to growl).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): [kɜː]
  • (US) IPA(key): [kɝ]
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)

Homophone: Kerr

Noun

cur (plural curs)

  1. (dated or humorous) A contemptible or inferior dog.
    • c. 1515–1516, published 1568, John Skelton, Againſt venemous tongues enpoyſoned with ſclaunder and falſe detractions &c.:
      A fals double tunge is more fiers and fell
      Then Cerberus the cur couching in the kenel of hel;
      Wherof hereafter, I thinke for to write,
      Of fals double tunges in the diſpite.
    • 1613, Shakespeare, The Famous History of the Life of King Henry VIII, Act 2, scene 4
      you have many enemies, that know not why they are so, but, like to village-curs, bark when their fellows do.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 25
      “You have no more spirit than a mongrel cur. You lie down on the ground and ask people to trample on you.”
  2. (dated or humorous) A detestable person.
    • 1613, Shakespeare, The Famous History of the Life of King Henry VIII, Act 1, scene 1
      This butcher’s cur is venom-mouth’d, and I have not the power to muzzle him.

Derived terms

  • curdog

Translations

See also

  • bitsa, bitser
  • mongrel
  • mutt

Anagrams

  • CRU, Cru, RUC, cru, ruc

Aromanian

Etymology 1

From Latin culus. Compare Romanian cur.

Alternative forms

  • curu

Noun

cur

  1. (slang, referring to the anus) ass

Etymology 2

From Latin currō. Compare Romanian cure, cur (modern curge, curg).

Alternative forms

  • curu

Verb

cur

  1. I run.
  2. I flow.

Derived terms

  • curari / curare

Etymology 3

From Latin cūrō. Compare archaic/regional Romanian cura, cur.

Alternative forms

  • curu

Verb

cur (past participle curatã)

  1. I clean.
Related terms
  • curari / curare
  • curat

Dalmatian

Etymology 1

From Latin cārus.

Alternative forms

  • cuor, kuor

Adjective

cur m (feminine cuora)

  1. dear, beloved

Etymology 2

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore, French coeur, Old Portuguese cor, Old Spanish cuer.

Noun

cur

  1. heart

Irish

Alternative forms

  • cuir

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kʊɾˠ]

Noun

cur m (genitive singular as substantive cuir, genitive as verbal noun curtha)

  1. verbal noun of cuir
  2. sowing, planting; tillage
  3. burial
  4. setting, laying
  5. course; round
  6. (of implements) set

Declension

Substantive
Verbal noun

Mutation

References

  • “cur” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “cur” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “cur” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Latin

Alternative forms

  • qūr, quūr, quōr (older spelling)
  • quur, cor (rare)

Etymology

From Old Latin quūr, quōr, from Proto-Italic *kʷōr, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷōr, having undergone pre-resonant and monosyllabic lengthening from *kʷor (where), from *kʷos (interrogative determiner) +‎ *-r (adverbial suffix). For similar lengthening effect, compare to *bʰōr. For other Indo-European cognates, compare:

  • Sanskrit कर्हि (kárhi, when), Proto-Germanic *hwar (where) < *kʷor
  • Old English hwǣr (where), Old High German hwār (where) < *kʷēr
  • Albanian kur (when), Lithuanian kur̃ (where, whither), Armenian ուր (ur, where) < *kʷur

See also quirquir (wherever(?)).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kuːr/, [kuːɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /kur/, [kur]

Adverb

cūr (not comparable)

  1. why, for what reason, wherefore, to what purpose, from what motive
    • 19 BC, Vergilius, Aeneis; Book XI, from line 424
      Cur ante tubam tremor occupat artus?

      Why before the trumpet (of war), fear seizes your limbs?

Derived terms

  • cūr nōn

References

  • cur in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cur in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cur in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • cūr” on page 519/1-2 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)

Manx

Etymology

A highly suppletive verb with forms derived from two already suppletive verbs.

  • The imperative and verbal noun forms are from Old Irish cuirid, from older cor, the verbal noun of fo·ceird. The verbal noun is etymologically unrelated to fo·ceird itself however, only arising in its paradigm due to suppletion.
  • All other forms of the verb are from Old Irish do·beir, itself also a suppletive verb. See also Scottish Gaelic thoir and Irish tabhair.

Verb

cur (verbal noun cur, coyrt)

  1. put
  2. give

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • cur ayns kishtey (box, crate, verb)

Mutation

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 cuirid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Megleno-Romanian

Etymology

From Latin culus.

Noun

cur

  1. (slang) asshole (anus)

Middle English

Noun

cur

  1. Alternative form of curre

Middle Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish caur, from Proto-Celtic *karuts.

Noun

cur m (genitive curad, nominative plural curaid)

  1. hero, warrior
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó’s Pig, section 15, published in Irische Teste, vol. 1 (1880), edited by Ernst Windisch:

Descendants

  • Irish: curadh

Derived terms

  • curadmír (warrior’s portion)

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “cur”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Romagnol

Noun

cur f pl

  1. plural of cùra

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kur/

Etymology 1

From Latin culus, from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-l-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH- (to cover). Compare Italian culo, French cul.

Noun

cur n (plural cururi)

  1. (slang, vulgar, referring to the anus) asshole
    Synonyms: anus, dos, fund, popou, șezut
Declension
Derived terms
  • curist

Etymology 2

Verb

cur

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of cura (to clean)

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

cur m (genitive singular cuir, no plural)

  1. verbal noun of cuir
  2. placing, setting, sending, sowing
  3. laying, pouring
  4. falling of snow, raining
  5. throwing

Derived terms

  • ath-chur (transplant)
  • eadar-chur (interjection, interruption)

Mutation

References

  • “cur” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial