calculate vs forecast what difference

what is difference between calculate and forecast

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin calculātus, perfect passive participle of calculō (I reckon, originally by means of pebbles), from calculus (a pebble). Refer to calculus for origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkælkjʊleɪt/, /ˈkælkjəleɪt/
  • Hyphenation: cal‧cu‧late

Verb

calculate (third-person singular simple present calculates, present participle calculating, simple past and past participle calculated)

  1. (transitive, mathematics) To determine the value of something or the solution to something by a mathematical process.
  2. (intransitive, mathematics) To determine values or solutions by a mathematical process; reckon.
  3. (intransitive, US, dialect) To plan; to expect; to think.
  4. To ascertain or predict by mathematical or astrological computations the time, circumstances, or other conditions of; to forecast or compute the character or consequences of.
  5. To adjust for purpose; to adapt by forethought or calculation; to fit or prepare by the adaptation of means to an end.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to particular Persons
      [Religion] is [] calculated for our benefit.
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (determine value of or solution to): compute, reckon (old), work out
  • (determine values or solutions): compute, reckon (old)

Derived terms

  • backcalculate
  • calculating

Related terms

  • calculation
  • calculus
  • calculator
  • incalculable

Translations

Further reading

  • calculate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • calculate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “calculate”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Latin

Verb

calculāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of calculō
    1. “calculate ye, compute ye”
    2. (figuratively) “consider ye as, esteem ye”

Participle

calculāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of calculātus


English

Etymology

From Middle English forecasten, forcasten, equivalent to fore- +‎ cast.
The noun is from Middle English forecast, forcast.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹkæst/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɔːkɑːst/

Verb

forecast (third-person singular simple present forecasts, present participle forecasting, simple past and past participle forecast or forecasted)

  1. To estimate how something will be in the future.
    to forecast the weather, or a storm
    to forecast a rise in prices
  2. To foreshadow; to suggest something in advance.
  3. (obsolete) To contrive or plan beforehand.

Translations

Noun

forecast (plural forecasts)

  1. An estimation of a future condition.
    1. A prediction of the weather.
  2. (gambling) exacta

Translations

Derived terms

  • (gambling): reverse forecast

Further reading

  • forecast on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • forecast in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • forecast in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • fastcore

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