canonise vs saint what difference

what is difference between canonise and saint

English

Etymology

See canonize; analysable as canon +‎ -ise.

Verb

canonise (third-person singular simple present canonises, present participle canonising, simple past and past participle canonised)

  1. Non-Oxford British English spelling of canonize

Anagrams

  • anconies, noiances

French

Verb

canonise

  1. first-person singular present indicative of canoniser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of canoniser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of canoniser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of canoniser
  5. second-person singular imperative of canoniser

Anagrams

  • énonçais

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kanoˈnise]

Verb

canonise

  1. third-person singular pluperfect indicative of canoni


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seɪnt/
    • Rhymes: -eɪnt
  • (UK, as an unstressed, capitalised title) IPA(key): /sən(t)/, /sɨn(t)/

Etymology 1

From Middle English saint, seint, sainct, seinct, sanct, senct, partly from Old English sanct (saint) and confluence with Old French saint, seinte (Modern French saint); both from Latin sanctus (holy, consecrated”, in Late Latin as a noun, “a saint), past participle of sancire (to render sacred, make holy), akin to sacer (holy, sacred). Displaced native Middle English halwe (saint) from Old English hālga (saint, holy one) (> Modern English hallow (saint)).

Noun

saint (plural saints)

  1. A person whom a church or another religious group has officially recognised as especially holy or godly; one eminent for piety and virtue.
    Kateri Tekakwitha was proclaimed a saint.
  2. (figuratively, by extension) A person with positive qualities; one who does good.
    Dorothy Day was a living saint.
    Thanks for looking after the house while I’m away. You’re a saint!
  3. One of the blessed in heaven.
  4. (archaic) A holy object.
Synonyms
  • (holy person): hallow (obsolete)
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • hallow
  • holos
  • holy

Etymology 2

From Middle English saynten, seinten, sonten, partly from Anglo-Norman saintir and partly from the noun Middle English seint, seynt (see above).

Verb

saint (third-person singular simple present saints, present participle sainting, simple past and past participle sainted)

  1. (transitive) To canonize, to formally recognize someone as a saint.
    Many wish to see Pope John Paul II sainted immediately.
Translations

Further reading

  • saint in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • saint in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Astin, Insta, Santi, Sinta, Tanis, Tians, antis, insta-, sat in, satin, stain, stian, tians, tisan

French

Etymology

From Latin sanctus (holy)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛ̃/
  • Rhymes: -ɛ̃
  • Homophones: sain, sains, saints, sein, seing, seings, seins, ceins, ceint, ceints

Noun

saint m (plural saints, feminine sainte)

  1. A male saint; masculine of sainte

Adjective

saint (feminine singular sainte, masculine plural saints, feminine plural saintes)

  1. saintly (all meanings)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “saint” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • tians

Irish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

saint f (genitive singular sainte)

  1. greed, avarice, covetousness
  2. great eagerness, desire

Declension

Synonyms

  • cíocras, gabhálacht (avarice)

Mutation


Norman

Etymology

From Old French saint, from Latin sanctus (holy).

Pronunciation

Adjective

saint m

  1. (Jersey) holy

Noun

saint m (plural saints)

  1. (Jersey, religion) saint

Old French

Alternative forms

  • sanct (rare)
  • saent (rare)
  • seint (common, chiefly Anglo-Norman)

Etymology

Latin sanctus

Noun

saint m (oblique plural sainz or saintz, nominative singular sainz or saintz, nominative plural saint)

  1. saint

Declension

Adjective

saint m (oblique and nominative feminine singular sainte)

  1. holy
  2. pious; devout

Descendants

  • English: saint
  • French: saint
  • Norman: saint (Jersey)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sai̯nt/

Noun

saint m pl (not mutable)

  1. plural of sant

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