canonize vs saint what difference

what is difference between canonize and saint

English

Etymology

From Late Middle English canonizen (to declare as a saint; to appoint to an ecclesiastical office), from Old French canonisier (modern French canoniser (to canonize)), or from its etymon Medieval Latin, Late Latin canōnizāre, the present active infinitive of Latin canōnizō (to recognize as a saint, canonize; to declare as authoritative or official), from Latin canōn (measuring line; (figurative) precept, rule, canon; authorized catalogue) + -izō (suffix forming verbs). Canōn is derived from Ancient Greek κᾰνών (kanṓn, measuring rod; general principle, norm, rule; model, paradigm); the further etymology is uncertain, but it may be related to κᾰ́ννᾱ (kánnā, giant reed (Arundo donax); reed mat), ultimately from Sumerian ???????? (gi.na). The English word is analysable as canon (general principle, rule; authoritative group of works; catalogue of saints canonized in the Roman Catholic Church) +‎ -ize.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkænənaɪz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkænəˌnaɪz/
  • Hyphenation: ca‧non‧ize

Verb

canonize (third-person singular simple present canonizes, present participle canonizing, simple past and past participle canonized) (transitive, American spelling, Oxford British English)

  1. (chiefly Roman Catholicism) To declare (a deceased person) as a saint, and enter them into the canon of saints.
    Synonym: saint
    Antonym: uncanonize
  2. (figuratively) To regard as a saint; to glorify, to exalt to the highest honour.
  3. (Christianity) To formally declare (a piece of religious writing) to be part of the biblical canon.
    Antonym: uncanonize
  4. (by extension) To regard (an artistic or written work) as one of a group of works representative of a particular field.
  5. (chiefly Christianity) Especially of a church: to give official approval to; to authorize, to sanction.
    Antonym: uncanonize

Conjugation

Alternative forms

  • canonise (non-Oxford British English)

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • beatify

References

Further reading

  • biblical canon on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • canonization on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Portuguese

Verb

canonize

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of canonizar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of canonizar
  3. third-person singular imperative of canonizar


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seɪnt/
    • Rhymes: -eɪnt
  • (UK, as an unstressed, capitalised title) IPA(key): /sən(t)/, /sɨn(t)/

Etymology 1

From Middle English saint, seint, sainct, seinct, sanct, senct, partly from Old English sanct (saint) and confluence with Old French saint, seinte (Modern French saint); both from Latin sanctus (holy, consecrated”, in Late Latin as a noun, “a saint), past participle of sancire (to render sacred, make holy), akin to sacer (holy, sacred). Displaced native Middle English halwe (saint) from Old English hālga (saint, holy one) (> Modern English hallow (saint)).

Noun

saint (plural saints)

  1. A person whom a church or another religious group has officially recognised as especially holy or godly; one eminent for piety and virtue.
    Kateri Tekakwitha was proclaimed a saint.
  2. (figuratively, by extension) A person with positive qualities; one who does good.
    Dorothy Day was a living saint.
    Thanks for looking after the house while I’m away. You’re a saint!
  3. One of the blessed in heaven.
  4. (archaic) A holy object.
Synonyms
  • (holy person): hallow (obsolete)
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • hallow
  • holos
  • holy

Etymology 2

From Middle English saynten, seinten, sonten, partly from Anglo-Norman saintir and partly from the noun Middle English seint, seynt (see above).

Verb

saint (third-person singular simple present saints, present participle sainting, simple past and past participle sainted)

  1. (transitive) To canonize, to formally recognize someone as a saint.
    Many wish to see Pope John Paul II sainted immediately.
Translations

Further reading

  • saint in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • saint in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Astin, Insta, Santi, Sinta, Tanis, Tians, antis, insta-, sat in, satin, stain, stian, tians, tisan

French

Etymology

From Latin sanctus (holy)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛ̃/
  • Rhymes: -ɛ̃
  • Homophones: sain, sains, saints, sein, seing, seings, seins, ceins, ceint, ceints

Noun

saint m (plural saints, feminine sainte)

  1. A male saint; masculine of sainte

Adjective

saint (feminine singular sainte, masculine plural saints, feminine plural saintes)

  1. saintly (all meanings)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “saint” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • tians

Irish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

saint f (genitive singular sainte)

  1. greed, avarice, covetousness
  2. great eagerness, desire

Declension

Synonyms

  • cíocras, gabhálacht (avarice)

Mutation


Norman

Etymology

From Old French saint, from Latin sanctus (holy).

Pronunciation

Adjective

saint m

  1. (Jersey) holy

Noun

saint m (plural saints)

  1. (Jersey, religion) saint

Old French

Alternative forms

  • sanct (rare)
  • saent (rare)
  • seint (common, chiefly Anglo-Norman)

Etymology

Latin sanctus

Noun

saint m (oblique plural sainz or saintz, nominative singular sainz or saintz, nominative plural saint)

  1. saint

Declension

Adjective

saint m (oblique and nominative feminine singular sainte)

  1. holy
  2. pious; devout

Descendants

  • English: saint
  • French: saint
  • Norman: saint (Jersey)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sai̯nt/

Noun

saint m pl (not mutable)

  1. plural of sant

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