capsize vs turtle what difference

what is difference between capsize and turtle

English

Alternative forms

  • capsise (obsolete)

Etymology

Attested since 1788 C.E.. Origin unknown. Possibly related to Spanish chapuzar (to sink by the head).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kæpˈsaɪz/

Verb

capsize (third-person singular simple present capsizes, present participle capsizing, simple past and past participle capsized)

  1. (intransitive, nautical) To overturn.
  2. (transitive, nautical) To cause (a ship) to overturn.
    • 1819-1824, Lord Byron, Don Juan
      But what if carrying sail capsize the boat?
  3. (intransitive, of knots) To deform under stress.

Synonyms

  • keel over
  • turn turtle

Related terms

  • capsized
  • capsizer

Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “capsize”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈtɜːtəl/
  • (US) enPR: tûrʹtəl, IPA(key): /ˈtɝtəl/, [ˈtʰɝɾɫ̩]
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)təl

Etymology 1

Modification of Middle English tortou, tortu, from Old French tortüe (under the influence of Middle English turtel, turtur (turtledove), see Etymology 2 below), from Medieval Latin tortuca (compare Spanish tortuga), the same source of tortoise (see there for more). Displaced native Old English byrdling.

Alternative forms

  • tortle (obsolete)

Noun

turtle (plural turtles)

  1. (zoology, US, Canada) Any land or marine reptile of the order Testudines, characterised by a protective shell enclosing its body. See also tortoise.
    Synonyms: (obsolete) shellpad, (archaic) shield-toad
  2. (zoology, Australia, Britain, specifically) A marine reptile of that order.
    Synonym: sea turtle
  3. (military, historical) An Ancient Roman attack method, where the shields held by the soldiers hide them, not only left, right, front and back, but also from above.
    Synonym: testudo
  4. (computing) A type of robot having a domed case (and so resembling the reptile), used in education, especially for making line drawings by means of a computer program.
  5. (computing) An on-screen cursor that serves the same function as a turtle for drawing.
  6. (printing, historical) The curved plate in which the form is held in a type-revolving cylinder press.
  7. (computing theory) A small element towards the end of a list of items to be bubble sorted, and thus tending to take a long time to be swapped into its correct position. Compare rabbit.
  8. (dance) A breakdancing move consisting of a float during which the dancer’s weight shifts from one hand to the other, producing rotation or a circular “walk”.
  9. (television) A low stand for a lamp etc.
    • Alan Bermingham, Location Lighting for Television
      Using an appropriate turtle allows the full range of pan and tilt adjustments on the luminaire and avoids possible heat damage to floor coverings.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

turtle (third-person singular simple present turtles, present participle turtling, simple past and past participle turtled)

  1. To flip over onto the back or top; to turn upside down.
    • 1919, Iowa Highway Commission, Service Bulletin, Issues 15-32, page 48
      Were speeding when car turtled [] Auto crashed into curb and turtled.
  2. To turn and swim upside down.
  3. To hunt turtles, especially in the water.
  4. (video games, board games) To build up a large defense force and strike only punctually, rather than going for an offensive strategy.
Translations

See also

  • chelonian
  • hatchling (turtle young)
  • terrapin
  • tortoise

References

  • turtle on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Turtle on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Testudines on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Testudines on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

Etymology 2

From Middle English turtle, tortle, turtel, turtul, from Old English turtle, turtla (turtledove), ultimately from Latin turtur (turtledove), of imitative origin.

Noun

turtle (plural turtles)

  1. (now rare, archaic) A turtle dove.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.8:
      The same he tooke, and with a riband new, / In which his Ladies colours were, did bind / About the turtles neck [] .
    • 1613, John Marston, William Barksted, The Insatiate Countess, I.1:
      As the turtle, every day has been a black day with her since her husband died, and what should we unruly members make here?
Derived terms
Translations

Anagrams

  • Lutter, ruttle, turlet

Old English

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin turtur (turtledove), of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈturt.le/, [ˈturˠt.le]

Noun

turtle f

  1. turtle dove

Coordinate terms

  • turtla m (turtle dove (male))

Declension


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial