captive vs intent what difference

what is difference between captive and intent

English

Etymology

From Middle English captif; in turn ultimately from Latin captīvus, probably through a borrowing from a Middle French intermediate. Doublet of caitiff.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæptɪv/
  • Hyphenation: cap‧tive

Noun

captive (plural captives)

  1. One who has been captured or is otherwise confined.
  2. One held prisoner.
  3. (figuratively) One charmed or subdued by beauty, excellence, or affection; one who is captivated.

Translations

Adjective

captive (not comparable)

  1. Held prisoner; not free; confined.
  2. Subdued by love; charmed; captivated.
  3. Of or relating to bondage or confinement; serving to confine.
    captive chains; captive hours

Antonyms

  • non-captive, noncaptive

Derived terms

  • captive candidate

Translations

Verb

captive (third-person singular simple present captives, present participle captiving, simple past and past participle captived)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To capture; to take captive.

French

Pronunciation

Verb

captive

  1. first-person singular present indicative of captiver
  2. third-person singular present indicative of captiver
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of captiver
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of captiver
  5. second-person singular imperative of captiver

Latin

Adjective

captīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of captīvus

Middle English

Noun

captive

  1. Alternative form of captif


English

Alternative forms

  • entent (obsolete)

Etymology

Existing since Middle English entente, from Old French entent or entente, ultimately from Latin intentus. Modified later in spelling to align more closely with the Latin word. Compare intention.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪnˈtɛnt/
    Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

intent (countable and uncountable, plural intents)

  1. A purpose; something that is intended.
  2. (law) The state of someone’s mind at the time of committing an offence.

Synonyms

  • (something that is intended): See also Thesaurus:intention

Translations

Adjective

intent (comparative more intent, superlative most intent)

  1. Firmly fixed or concentrated on something.
    • 2014, Daniel Taylor, “World Cup 2014: Uruguay sink England as Suárez makes his mark,” guardian.co.uk, 20 June:
      Uruguay were quick to the ball, strong in the tackle and seemed intent on showing they were a better team than had been apparent in their defeat to Costa Rica.
    • And it was while all were passionately intent upon the pleasing and snake-like progress of their uncle that a young girl in furs, ascending the stairs two at a time, peeped perfunctorily into the nursery as she passed the hallway—and halted amazed.
  2. Engrossed.
  3. Unwavering from a course of action.

Translations

Related terms


Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin intentus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /inˈtent/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /inˈten/

Noun

intent m (plural intents)

  1. try, attempt
  2. (castells) a castell that collapses before its construction is completed (as opposed to a castell carregat, which collapses after it is completed, or an intent desmuntat, which is not completed but is successfully dismantled without collapsing)

Related terms

  • intenció
  • intentar

Further reading

  • “intent” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “intent” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “intent” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “intent” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

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