capture vs entrance what difference

what is difference between capture and entrance

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French capture (noun), from Latin captūra.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkæp.t͡ʃɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkæp.t͡ʃə/
  • Rhymes: -æptʃə(ɹ)

Noun

capture (countable and uncountable, plural captures)

  1. An act of capturing; a seizing by force or stratagem.
    • even with regard to captures made at sea
  2. The securing of an object of strife or desire, as by the power of some attraction.
  3. Something that has been captured; a captive.
  4. The recording or storage of something for later playback.
  5. (computing) A particular match found for a pattern in a text string.

Translations

Verb

capture (third-person singular simple present captures, present participle capturing, simple past and past participle captured)

  1. (transitive) To take control of; to seize by force or stratagem.
  2. (transitive) To store (as in sounds or image) for later revisitation.
  3. (transitive) To reproduce convincingly.
  4. (transitive) To remove or take control of an opponent’s piece in a game (e.g., chess, go, checkers).
    • 1954, Fred Reinfeld, How to Be a Winner at Chess, page 63, Hanover House (Garden City, NY)
      How deeply ingrained capturing is in the mind of a chess master can be seen from this story.

Translations

Derived terms

  • capture the flag
  • piscicapture
  • recapture
  • regulatory capture
  • screen capture
  • uncapture

Related terms

  • captivate
  • captive
  • captivity
  • caption

See also

  • take
  • arrest
  • apprehend
  • take over
  • snapshot

Anagrams

  • cuprate, uptrace

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin captūra (catching, capture), from captus, perfect passive participle of capiō (capture, seize, take).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kap.tyʁ/

Noun

capture f (plural captures)

  1. capture
  2. a catch, a take

Derived terms

  • capture d’écran
  • capturer

Further reading

  • “capture” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • aperçut, aperçût
  • capteur
  • percuta

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kapˈtuː.re/, [käpˈt̪uːɾɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /kapˈtu.re/, [kɑpˈt̪uːrɛ]

Participle

captūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of captūrus

Portuguese

Verb

capture

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of capturar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of capturar
  3. first-person singular imperative of capturar
  4. third-person singular imperative of capturar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kapˈtuɾe/, [kapˈt̪u.ɾe]

Verb

capture

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of capturar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of capturar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of capturar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of capturar.


English

Alternative forms

  • entraunce

Etymology 1

From Middle French entrance (entry). Replaced native Middle English ingang (entrance, admission), from Old English ingang (ingress, entry, entrance).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: ĕn’trəns, IPA(key): /ˈɛn.tɹəns/

Noun

entrance (countable and uncountable, plural entrances)

  1. (countable) The action of entering, or going in.
  2. The act of taking possession, as of property, or of office.
  3. (countable) The place of entering, as a gate or doorway.
  4. (uncountable) The right to go in.
  5. The entering upon; the beginning, or that with which the beginning is made; the commencement; initiation.
    a difficult entrance into business
    • 1794, Henry Hunter, Sacred Biography
      in the entrance of the history of this great patriarch
  6. The causing to be entered upon a register, as a ship or goods, at a customhouse; an entering.
  7. (nautical) The angle which the bow of a vessel makes with the water at the water line.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ham. Nav. Encyc to this entry?)
  8. (nautical) The bow, or entire wedgelike forepart of a vessel, below the water line.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  9. (music) When a musician starts playing or singing, entry.
Synonyms
  • ingang
Antonyms
  • exit
Translations

Etymology 2

From en- + trance (daze)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɛnˈtɹæns/
  • Rhymes: -æns

Verb

entrance (third-person singular simple present entrances, present participle entrancing, simple past and past participle entranced)

  1. (transitive) To delight and fill with wonder.
    • 1996, Tab Murphy, Irene Mecchi, Bob Tzudiker, Noni White, and Jonathan Roberts, The Hunchback of Notre Dame (film)
      See the finest girl in France make an entrance to entrance
  2. (transitive) To put into a trance.
Translations

Anagrams

  • centenar, enneract, rectenna

Middle French

Etymology

First attested in late Old French, from entrer +‎ -ance.

Noun

entrance f (plural entrances)

  1. entrance (place where entry is possible)
  2. permission to enter

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (entrance)
  • “entrance” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Verb

entrance

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of entrançar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of entrançar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of entrançar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of entrançar

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