capture vs seize what difference

what is difference between capture and seize

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French capture (noun), from Latin captūra.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkæp.t͡ʃɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkæp.t͡ʃə/
  • Rhymes: -æptʃə(ɹ)

Noun

capture (countable and uncountable, plural captures)

  1. An act of capturing; a seizing by force or stratagem.
    • even with regard to captures made at sea
  2. The securing of an object of strife or desire, as by the power of some attraction.
  3. Something that has been captured; a captive.
  4. The recording or storage of something for later playback.
  5. (computing) A particular match found for a pattern in a text string.

Translations

Verb

capture (third-person singular simple present captures, present participle capturing, simple past and past participle captured)

  1. (transitive) To take control of; to seize by force or stratagem.
  2. (transitive) To store (as in sounds or image) for later revisitation.
  3. (transitive) To reproduce convincingly.
  4. (transitive) To remove or take control of an opponent’s piece in a game (e.g., chess, go, checkers).
    • 1954, Fred Reinfeld, How to Be a Winner at Chess, page 63, Hanover House (Garden City, NY)
      How deeply ingrained capturing is in the mind of a chess master can be seen from this story.

Translations

Derived terms

  • capture the flag
  • piscicapture
  • recapture
  • regulatory capture
  • screen capture
  • uncapture

Related terms

  • captivate
  • captive
  • captivity
  • caption

See also

  • take
  • arrest
  • apprehend
  • take over
  • snapshot

Anagrams

  • cuprate, uptrace

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin captūra (catching, capture), from captus, perfect passive participle of capiō (capture, seize, take).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kap.tyʁ/

Noun

capture f (plural captures)

  1. capture
  2. a catch, a take

Derived terms

  • capture d’écran
  • capturer

Further reading

  • “capture” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • aperçut, aperçût
  • capteur
  • percuta

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kapˈtuː.re/, [käpˈt̪uːɾɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /kapˈtu.re/, [kɑpˈt̪uːrɛ]

Participle

captūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of captūrus

Portuguese

Verb

capture

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of capturar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of capturar
  3. first-person singular imperative of capturar
  4. third-person singular imperative of capturar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kapˈtuɾe/, [kapˈt̪u.ɾe]

Verb

capture

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of capturar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of capturar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of capturar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of capturar.


English

Etymology

Earlier seise, from Middle English seisen, sesen, saisen, from Old French seisir (to take possession of; invest (person, court)), from Medieval Latin sacīre (to lay claim to, appropriate) (8th century) in the phrase ad propriam sacire, from Old Low Frankish *sakjan (to sue, bring legal action), from Proto-Germanic *sakjaną, *sakōną (compare Old English sacian (to strive, brawl)), from Proto-Germanic *sakaną (compare Old Saxon sakan (to accuse), Old High German sahhan (to bicker, quarrel, rebuke), Old English sacan (to quarrel, claim by law, accuse). Cognate to sake and Latin sagio (to perceive acutely).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sēz, IPA(key): /siːz/
  • Homophones: seas, sees

Verb

seize (third-person singular simple present seizes, present participle seizing, simple past and past participle seized)

  1. (transitive) To deliberately take hold of; to grab or capture.
    Synonyms: clasp, grasp, grip; see also Thesaurus:grasp
  2. (transitive) To take advantage of (an opportunity or circumstance).
    Synonym: jump on
  3. (transitive) To take possession of (by force, law etc.).
    Synonyms: arrogate, commandeer, confiscate
  4. (transitive) To have a sudden and powerful effect upon.
    • 2010, Antonio Saggio, A Secret van Gogh: His Motif and Motives, →ISBN, 11:
      This sensation of an object becoming alive is a characteristic that, I believe, seizes all viewers of a van Gogh. The Bible goes beyond being a simple still-life object to become a living thing, an expression of strength, an existence that emanates from itself, beyond the painting surface to participate in our very lives.
  5. (transitive, nautical) To bind, lash or make fast, with several turns of small rope, cord, or small line.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To fasten, fix.
  7. (intransitive) To lay hold in seizure, by hands or claws (+ on or upon).
  8. (intransitive) To have a seizure.
  9. (intransitive) To bind or lock in position immovably; see also seize up.
    • 2012, Martha Holmberg, Modern Sauces: More Than 150 Recipes for Every Cook, Every Day (page 235)
      Chocolate seizes if a small amount of water (or watery liquid such as brandy) finds its way into the chocolate while it is melting. [] If chocolate seizes, it will look grainy and matte rather than glossy and smooth.
  10. (Britain, intransitive) To submit for consideration to a deliberative body.
  11. (law) (with of) To cause (an action or matter) to be or remain before (a certain judge or court).
    This Court will remain seized of this matter.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • seizure

Translations

References

  • seize in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “seize”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

French

Etymology

From Middle French seze, from Old French seize, seze, from Latin sēdecim.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛz/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): [saiz]
  • Rhymes: -ɛz

Numeral

seize

  1. sixteen

Derived terms

  • seizième

Related terms

  • six
  • dix

Further reading

  • “seize” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

From Old French seize, from Latin sēdecim.

Pronunciation

Numeral

seize

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) sixteen

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