cardinal vs central what difference

what is difference between cardinal and central

English

Etymology

From Middle French cardinal, from Latin cardinālis (pertaining to a hinge, hence applied to that on which something turns or depends, important, principal, chief), from cardō (hinge) + -ālis, adjectival suffix.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɑː.dɪ.nəl/, /ˈkɑːd.nəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑɹdɪnəl/, /ˈkɑɹdnəl/

Adjective

cardinal (comparative more cardinal, superlative most cardinal)

  1. Of fundamental importance; crucial, pivotal.
    • 1613, William Shakespeare, Henry VIII (play),
      But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye.
    • a. 1631, Michael Drayton, To my noble friend Mr. William Brown, of the evil time
      Impudence is now a cardinal virtue.
  2. (nautical) Of or relating to the cardinal directions (north, south, east and west).
  3. Describing a “natural” number used to indicate quantity (e.g., zero, one, two, three), as opposed to an ordinal number indicating relative position.
  4. Having a bright red color (from the color of a Catholic cardinal’s cassock).

Translations

Noun

cardinal (plural cardinals)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) One of the officials appointed by the pope in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking only below the pope and the patriarchs, constituting the special college which elects the pope. (See Wikipedia article on Catholic cardinals.)
  2. Any of a genus of songbirds of the finch family, Cardinalis.
  3. Any of various related passerine birds of the family Cardinalidae (See Wikipedia article on cardinals) and other similar birds that were once considered to be related.
    • Breezes blowing from beds of iris quickened her breath with their perfume; she saw the tufted lilacs sway in the wind, and the streamers of mauve-tinted wistaria swinging, all a-glisten with golden bees; she saw a crimson cardinal winging through the foliage, and amorous tanagers flashing like scarlet flames athwart the pines.
  4. (color) A deep red color, somewhat less vivid than scarlet, the traditional colour of a Catholic cardinal’s cassock. (same as cardinal red)
  5. (mathematics) Short for cardinal number, a number indicating quantity, or the size of a set (e.g., zero, one, two, three). (See Wikipedia article on Cardinal number.)
    • 1920, Bertrand Russell, Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, p.83:
      This cardinal number is the smallest of the infinite cardinal numbers; it is the one to which Cantor has appropriated the Hebrew aleph with the suffix 0, to distinguish it from larger infinite cardinals. Thus the name of the smallest of infinite cardinals is 0א.
  6. (grammar) Short for cardinal numeral, a word used to represent a cardinal number.
    • 2005, Frederic M. Wheelock, Wheelock’s Latin, 6th ed. revised, p.97:
      The commonest numerals in Latin, as in English, are the “cardinals [] and the “ordinals” [].
  7. Short for cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), a flowering plant.
  8. Short for cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi), a freshwater fish.
  9. (now historical) A woman’s short cloak with a hood, originally made of scarlet cloth.
    • 1775, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The Duenna, I.3:
      She has valuables of mine; besides, my cardinal and veil are in her room.
    • c. 1760, Robert Lloyd, Chit-Chat, an imitation of Theocritus
      Where’s your cardinal! Make haste.
  10. (obsolete) Mulled red wine.

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • (woman’s cloak; mulled red wine): Hotten’s Slang Dictionary (1873)

See also

  • (reds) red; blood red, brick red, burgundy, cardinal, carmine, carnation, cerise, cherry, cherry red, Chinese red, cinnabar, claret, crimson, damask, fire brick, fire engine red, flame, flamingo, fuchsia, garnet, geranium, gules, hot pink, incarnadine, Indian red, magenta, maroon, misty rose, nacarat, oxblood, pillar-box red, pink, Pompeian red, poppy, raspberry, red violet, rose, rouge, ruby, ruddy, salmon, sanguine, scarlet, shocking pink, stammel, strawberry, Turkey red, Venetian red, vermillion, vinaceous, vinous, violet red, wine (Category: en:Reds)
  • Contrast with ordinal (numbers)
  • Card. (abbreviation)

Anagrams

  • Clarinda

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /kəɾ.diˈnal/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /kər.diˈnal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /kaɾ.diˈnal/

Adjective

cardinal (feminine cardinala, masculine plural cardinals, feminine plural cardinales)

  1. cardinal

Derived terms

  • punt cardinal

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin cardinālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaʁ.di.nal/

Adjective

cardinal (feminine singular cardinale, masculine plural cardinaux, feminine plural cardinales)

  1. Important; paramount.
  2. (mathematics) cardinal.

Derived terms

  • point cardinal

Noun

cardinal m (plural cardinaux)

  1. (religion) cardinal.
  2. Cardinal number.
  3. Cardinal (bird).

Noun

cardinal m (plural cardinal)

  1. cardinal (color).

Further reading

  • “cardinal” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Noun

cardinal m (invariable)

  1. Apocopic form of cardinale

Anagrams

  • calandri

Middle French

Noun

cardinal m (plural cardinauls)

  1. (Christianity) cardinal.

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /kaʁ.d͡ʒiˈnaw/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /kaɾ.ðiˈnaɫ/
  • Hyphenation: car‧di‧nal

Adjective

cardinal m or f (plural cardinais, comparable)

  1. cardinal (describing a number that indicates quantity)
    Synonym: cardeal

Noun

cardinal m (plural cardinais)

  1. cardinal (number indicating quantity)
    Synonym: cardeal
  2. (typography) hash (the # symbol)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French cardinal, Latin cardinālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kar.diˈnal/

Adjective

cardinal m or n (feminine singular cardinală, masculine plural cardinali, feminine and neuter plural cardinale)

  1. principal, essential, fundamental

Declension

Synonyms

  • capital, crucial, decisiv, esențial, fundamental

Derived terms

  • numeral cardinal
  • punct cardinal
  • roșu cardinal, roșu-cardinal
  • virtuți cardinale

Noun

cardinal m (plural cardinali)

  1. (religion) cardinal
  2. cardinal (bird)
  3. a variety of grape, cultivated for consumption

Declension

Derived terms

  • cardinalat
  • cardinalist

References

  • cardinal in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin cardinālis, cardināli.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaɾdiˈnal/, [kaɾ.ð̞iˈnal]
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Hyphenation: car‧di‧nal

Adjective

cardinal (plural cardinales)

  1. cardinal (crucial, pivotal)
    Synonym: fundamental
  2. cardinal (describing a number used to indicate quantity)
    Antonym: ordinal

Derived terms

Related terms

  • cardenal

Further reading

  • “cardinal” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centrālis, from centrum (centre), from Ancient Greek κέντρον (kéntron).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛntɹəl/

Adjective

central (comparative more central, superlative most central)

  1. Being in the centre.
  2. Having or containing the centre of something.
  3. Being very important, or key to something.
    Synonyms: dominant, main, principal
  4. (anatomy) Exerting its action towards the peripheral organs.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • center

Translations

Noun

central (plural centrals)

  1. (especially US) centre

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centrālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /sənˈtɾal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /senˈtɾal/

Adjective

central (masculine and feminine plural centrals)

  1. central (being in the centre)

Derived terms

  • centralment
  • centralitat
  • centralitzar

Related terms

  • centre

Noun

central f (plural centrals)

  1. nexus; headquarters (non-military); central office
  2. (electricity) power plant

Synonyms

  • seu (seat or headquarters)

Antonyms

  • sucursal (branch office)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “central” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “central” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “central” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “central” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centralis.

Noun

central c (singular definite centralen, plural indefinite centraler)

  1. headquarters, place whence organizations are administrated

Declension

Adjective

central

  1. central, being in the centre

Inflection

References

  • “central” in Den Danske Ordbog

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centrālis. Synchronically analysable as centre +‎ -al.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑ̃.tʁal/

Adjective

central (feminine singular centrale, masculine plural centraux, feminine plural centrales)

  1. central

Antonyms

  • périphérique

Derived terms

  • banque centrale
  • chauffage central (central heating)
  • Massif central
  • rond central
  • système nerveux central
  • unité centrale
  • vision centrale

Related terms

Descendants

  • Turkish: santral

Further reading

  • “central” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • raclent

Galician

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centrālis.

Adjective

central m or f (plural centrais)

  1. central

Derived terms

  • centralismo
  • centralista
  • centralizar

Related terms

  • centro

Further reading

  • “central” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Occitan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centrālis.

Pronunciation

Adjective

central m (feminine singular centrala, masculine plural centrals, feminine plural centralas)

  1. central

Related terms

  • centre

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centrālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /sẽ.ˈtɾaɫ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /sẽ.ˈtɾaw/, [s̻ẽ̞ɪ̯̃ⁿ.ˈtɾäʊ̯]
  • Hyphenation: cen‧tral

Adjective

central m or f (plural centrais, comparable)

  1. central

Noun

central f (plural centrais)

  1. centre
  2. headquarters
  3. (Portugal, soccer) back (player in a position behind most players on the team)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French central, Latin centrālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [t͡ʃenˈtral]

Adjective

central m or n (feminine singular centrală, masculine plural centrali, feminine and neuter plural centrale)

  1. central, pivotal, nodal

Declension

Related terms

  • centru

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin centrālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /θenˈtɾal/, [θẽn̪ˈt̪ɾal]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /senˈtɾal/, [sẽn̪ˈt̪ɾal]

Adjective

central (plural centrales)

  1. central

Derived terms

  • centralismo
  • centralista
  • centralizar
  • centralmente
  • precentral

Noun

central f (plural centrales)

  1. headquarter
  2. center
  3. power station
    Synonym: centra eléctrica

Derived terms

Related terms

  • centrar
  • céntrico
  • centro

Further reading

  • “central” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin centrālis, from centrum (center point) + -ālis.

Pronunciation

Adjective

central

  1. central, centralized, situated at the centre (of a town)
  2. central, important
Declension
Related terms

Etymology 2

Clipping of centralstation, or any other compound of the adjective.

Noun

central c

  1. a central, a centre, a central station, a junction, a connection point, an electrical switchboard
Declension
Related terms

References

  • central in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial