carry vs convey what difference

what is difference between carry and convey

English

Etymology

From Middle English carrien, from Anglo-Norman carier (modern French charrier); from a derivative of Latin carrus (four-wheeled baggage wagon), ultimately of Gaulish origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæ.ɹi/ or (Marymarrymerry merger) IPA(key): /ˈkɛ.ɹi/
  • Rhymes: -æri
  • Homophones: Carrie, Cary

Verb

carry (third-person singular simple present carries, present participle carrying, simple past and past participle carried)

  1. (transitive) To lift (something) and take it to another place; to transport (something) by lifting.
  2. To notionally transfer from one place (such as a country, book, or column) to another.
  3. To convey by extension or continuance; to extend.
  4. (transitive, chiefly archaic) To move; to convey using force
    Synonyms: impel, conduct
  5. to lead or guide.
    • Passion and revenge will carry them too far.
  6. (transitive) To stock or supply (something); to have in store.
  7. (transitive) To adopt (something); take (something) over.
  8. (transitive) To adopt or resolve on, especially in a deliberative assembly
  9. (transitive, arithmetic) In an addition, to transfer the quantity in excess of what is countable in the units in a column to the column immediately to the left in order to be added there.
  10. (transitive) To have, hold, possess or maintain (something).
  11. (intransitive) To be transmitted; to travel.
  12. (slang, transitive) To insult, to diss.
  13. (transitive, nautical) To capture a ship by coming alongside and boarding.
  14. (transitive, sports) To transport (the ball) whilst maintaining possession.
  15. (transitive) To have on one’s person.
  16. To be pregnant (with).
  17. To have propulsive power; to propel.
  18. To hold the head; said of a horse.
  19. (hunting) To have earth or frost stick to the feet when running, as a hare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  20. To bear or uphold successfully through conflict, for example a leader or principle
    • 1708, Joseph Addison, The Present State of the War, and the Necessity of an Augmentation
      the carrying of our main point
  21. to succeed in (e.g. a contest); to succeed in; to win.
  22. (obsolete) To get possession of by force; to capture.
  23. To contain; to comprise; have a particular aspect; to show or exhibit
    • 2014, Gregg Olsen and Rebecca Morris, If I Can’t Have You: Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of her Children
      Things of little value carry great importance.
  24. (reflexive) To bear (oneself); to behave or conduct.
    • 1702-1704, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, The History of the Rebellion
      He carried himself so insolently in the house, and out of the house, to all persons, that he became odious.
  25. To bear the charges or burden of holding or having, as stocks, merchandise, etc., from one time to another.
  26. (intransitive) To have a weapon on one’s person; to be armed.
  27. (gaming) To be disproportionately responsible for a team’s success.
    He absolutely carried the game, to the point of killing the entire enemy team by himself.
  28. (Southern US) to physically transport (in the general sense, not necessarily by lifting)
    Will you carry me to town?

Synonyms

  • (lift and bring to somewhere else): bear, move, transport
  • (stock, supply): have, keep, stock, supply
  • (adopt): adopt, take on, take over
  • (have, maintain): have, maintain
  • (be transmitted, travel): be transmitted, travel

Antonyms

  • (in arithmetic): borrow (the equivalent reverse procedure in the inverse operation of subtraction)

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

carry (plural carries)

  1. A manner of transporting or lifting something; the grip or position in which something is carried.
    Adjust your carry from time to time so that you don’t tire too quickly.
  2. A tract of land over which boats or goods are carried between two bodies of navigable water; a portage.
    • 1862, The Atlantic Monthly (volume 10, page 533)
      Undrowned, unducked, as safe from the perils of the broad lake as we had come out of the defiles of the rapids, we landed at the carry below the dam at the lake’s outlet.
  3. (computing) The bit or digit that is carried in an addition operation.
  4. (finance) The benefit or cost of owning an asset over time.
  5. (golf) The distance travelled by the ball when struck, until it hits the ground.
  6. (finance) Carried interest.
  7. (Britain, dialect) The sky; cloud-drift.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Crary


English

Etymology

From Middle English conveien, from Old French conveier (French French convoyer), from Vulgar Latin *convio, from Classical Latin via (way). Compare convoy.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənˈveɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Verb

convey (third-person singular simple present conveys, present participle conveying, simple past and past participle conveyed)

  1. To move (something) from one place to another.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, 1 Kings 5:8-9,[1]
      [] I will do all thy desire concerning timber of cedar, and concerning timber of fir. My servants shall bring them down from Lebanon unto the sea: and I will convey them by sea in floats unto the place that thou shalt appoint me, and will cause them to be discharged there []
    • 1858, Henry Gray, London: John W. Parker & Son, “Female Organs of Generation,” p. 688,[2]
      The Fallopian Tubes, or oviducts, convey the ova from the ovaries to the cavity of the uterus.
  2. (dated) To take or carry (someone) from one place to another.
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, Richard II, Act II, Scene 1,[3]
      Convey me to my bed, then to my grave:
      Love they to live that love and honour have.
    • 1717, Samuel Croxall (translator), Ovid’s Metamorphoses in Fifteen Books, Translated by the Most Eminent Hands, London: Jacob Tonson, Book the Sixth, p. 200,[4]
      [] the false Tyrant seiz’d the Princely Maid,
      And to a Lodge in distant Woods convey’d;
    • 1817, Jane Austen, Persuasion, Chapter 19,[5]
      It began to rain, not much, but enough to make shelter desirable for women, and quite enough to make it very desirable for Miss Elliot to have the advantage of being conveyed home in Lady Dalrymple’s carriage, which was seen waiting at a little distance []
  3. To communicate; to make known; to portray.
    • 1690, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, London: Thomas Basset, Book III, Chapter 9, p. 232,[6]
      To make Words serviceable to the end of Communication is necessary [] that they excite, in the Hearer, exactly the same Idea they stand for, in the Mind of the Speaker: Without this, Men fill one another’s Heads with noise and sounds; but convey not thereby their Thoughts, and lay not before one another their Ideas, which is the end of Discourse and Language.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Dublin: John Smith, Volume 2, Book 7, Chapter 6, p. 27,[7]
      This excellent Method of conveying a Falshood with the Heart only, without making the Tongue guilty of an Untruth, by the Means of Equivocation and Imposture, hath quieted the Conscience of many a notable Deceiver []
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine, Chapter 3,[8]
      I am afraid I cannot convey the peculiar sensations of time travelling.
    • 1927, Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse, Chapter 1,[9]
      To her son these words conveyed an extraordinary joy, as if it were settled, the expedition were bound to take place, and the wonder to which he had looked forward, for years and years it seemed, was, after a night’s darkness and a day’s sail, within touch.
  4. (law) To transfer legal rights (to).
    He conveyed ownership of the company to his daughter.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, A View of the Present State of Ireland, Dublin, The Hibernia Press, 1809, p. 42,[10]
      [] before his breaking forth into open rebellion, [the Earle of Desmond] had conveyed secretly all his lands to feoffees of trust, in hope to have cut off her Maiestie from the escheate of his lands.
  5. (obsolete) To manage with privacy; to carry out.
    • 1557, uncredited translator, A Mery Dialogue by Erasmus, London: Antony Kytson,[11]
      I shall so conuey my matters, that he shall dysclose all together hym selfe, what busynesse is betwene you []
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act I, Scene 2,[12]
      I will seek him, sir, presently; convey the business as I shall find means, and acquaint you withal.
  6. (obsolete) To carry or take away secretly; to steal; to thieve.
    • 1592, Robert Greene, A Disputation betweene a Hee Conny-Catcher and a Shee Conny-Catcher, London: T. Gubbin,
      Suppose you are good at the lift, who be more cunning then we women, in that we are more trusted, for they little suspect vs, and we haue as close conueyance as you men, though you haue Cloakes, we haue skirts of gownes, handbaskets, the crownes of our hattes, our plackardes, and for a need, false bagges vnder our smockes, wherein we can conuey more closely then you.

Synonyms

  • (to move something from one place to another): carry, transport
  • (to take someone from one place to another): accompany, conduct (archaic), escort
  • (to communicate a message): express, send, relay

Derived terms

Related terms

  • convoy

Translations


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