carry vs gestate what difference

what is difference between carry and gestate

English

Etymology

From Middle English carrien, from Anglo-Norman carier (modern French charrier); from a derivative of Latin carrus (four-wheeled baggage wagon), ultimately of Gaulish origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæ.ɹi/ or (Marymarrymerry merger) IPA(key): /ˈkɛ.ɹi/
  • Rhymes: -æri
  • Homophones: Carrie, Cary

Verb

carry (third-person singular simple present carries, present participle carrying, simple past and past participle carried)

  1. (transitive) To lift (something) and take it to another place; to transport (something) by lifting.
  2. To notionally transfer from one place (such as a country, book, or column) to another.
  3. To convey by extension or continuance; to extend.
  4. (transitive, chiefly archaic) To move; to convey using force
    Synonyms: impel, conduct
  5. to lead or guide.
    • Passion and revenge will carry them too far.
  6. (transitive) To stock or supply (something); to have in store.
  7. (transitive) To adopt (something); take (something) over.
  8. (transitive) To adopt or resolve on, especially in a deliberative assembly
  9. (transitive, arithmetic) In an addition, to transfer the quantity in excess of what is countable in the units in a column to the column immediately to the left in order to be added there.
  10. (transitive) To have, hold, possess or maintain (something).
  11. (intransitive) To be transmitted; to travel.
  12. (slang, transitive) To insult, to diss.
  13. (transitive, nautical) To capture a ship by coming alongside and boarding.
  14. (transitive, sports) To transport (the ball) whilst maintaining possession.
  15. (transitive) To have on one’s person.
  16. To be pregnant (with).
  17. To have propulsive power; to propel.
  18. To hold the head; said of a horse.
  19. (hunting) To have earth or frost stick to the feet when running, as a hare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  20. To bear or uphold successfully through conflict, for example a leader or principle
    • 1708, Joseph Addison, The Present State of the War, and the Necessity of an Augmentation
      the carrying of our main point
  21. to succeed in (e.g. a contest); to succeed in; to win.
  22. (obsolete) To get possession of by force; to capture.
  23. To contain; to comprise; have a particular aspect; to show or exhibit
    • 2014, Gregg Olsen and Rebecca Morris, If I Can’t Have You: Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of her Children
      Things of little value carry great importance.
  24. (reflexive) To bear (oneself); to behave or conduct.
    • 1702-1704, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, The History of the Rebellion
      He carried himself so insolently in the house, and out of the house, to all persons, that he became odious.
  25. To bear the charges or burden of holding or having, as stocks, merchandise, etc., from one time to another.
  26. (intransitive) To have a weapon on one’s person; to be armed.
  27. (gaming) To be disproportionately responsible for a team’s success.
    He absolutely carried the game, to the point of killing the entire enemy team by himself.
  28. (Southern US) to physically transport (in the general sense, not necessarily by lifting)
    Will you carry me to town?

Synonyms

  • (lift and bring to somewhere else): bear, move, transport
  • (stock, supply): have, keep, stock, supply
  • (adopt): adopt, take on, take over
  • (have, maintain): have, maintain
  • (be transmitted, travel): be transmitted, travel

Antonyms

  • (in arithmetic): borrow (the equivalent reverse procedure in the inverse operation of subtraction)

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

carry (plural carries)

  1. A manner of transporting or lifting something; the grip or position in which something is carried.
    Adjust your carry from time to time so that you don’t tire too quickly.
  2. A tract of land over which boats or goods are carried between two bodies of navigable water; a portage.
    • 1862, The Atlantic Monthly (volume 10, page 533)
      Undrowned, unducked, as safe from the perils of the broad lake as we had come out of the defiles of the rapids, we landed at the carry below the dam at the lake’s outlet.
  3. (computing) The bit or digit that is carried in an addition operation.
  4. (finance) The benefit or cost of owning an asset over time.
  5. (golf) The distance travelled by the ball when struck, until it hits the ground.
  6. (finance) Carried interest.
  7. (Britain, dialect) The sky; cloud-drift.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Crary


English

Etymology

Back-formation from gestation.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛsˈteɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb

gestate (third-person singular simple present gestates, present participle gestating, simple past and past participle gestated)

  1. (intransitive) To carry offspring in the uterus from conception to delivery.
    • 2012, H. DeWayne Ashmead, Amino Acid Chelation in Human and Animal Nutrition, CRC Press (→ISBN)
      In the early 1960s, a study was conducted in which gestating rats were given diets containing the same mineral content of mineral salts or amino acid chelates.
  2. (by extension, intransitive) To develop an idea.

Related terms

  • gestation

Translations

Anagrams

  • tagetes

Latin

Participle

gestāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of gestātus

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