carry vs post what difference

what is difference between carry and post

English

Etymology

From Middle English carrien, from Anglo-Norman carier (modern French charrier); from a derivative of Latin carrus (four-wheeled baggage wagon), ultimately of Gaulish origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæ.ɹi/ or (Marymarrymerry merger) IPA(key): /ˈkɛ.ɹi/
  • Rhymes: -æri
  • Homophones: Carrie, Cary

Verb

carry (third-person singular simple present carries, present participle carrying, simple past and past participle carried)

  1. (transitive) To lift (something) and take it to another place; to transport (something) by lifting.
  2. To notionally transfer from one place (such as a country, book, or column) to another.
  3. To convey by extension or continuance; to extend.
  4. (transitive, chiefly archaic) To move; to convey using force
    Synonyms: impel, conduct
  5. to lead or guide.
    • Passion and revenge will carry them too far.
  6. (transitive) To stock or supply (something); to have in store.
  7. (transitive) To adopt (something); take (something) over.
  8. (transitive) To adopt or resolve on, especially in a deliberative assembly
  9. (transitive, arithmetic) In an addition, to transfer the quantity in excess of what is countable in the units in a column to the column immediately to the left in order to be added there.
  10. (transitive) To have, hold, possess or maintain (something).
  11. (intransitive) To be transmitted; to travel.
  12. (slang, transitive) To insult, to diss.
  13. (transitive, nautical) To capture a ship by coming alongside and boarding.
  14. (transitive, sports) To transport (the ball) whilst maintaining possession.
  15. (transitive) To have on one’s person.
  16. To be pregnant (with).
  17. To have propulsive power; to propel.
  18. To hold the head; said of a horse.
  19. (hunting) To have earth or frost stick to the feet when running, as a hare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  20. To bear or uphold successfully through conflict, for example a leader or principle
    • 1708, Joseph Addison, The Present State of the War, and the Necessity of an Augmentation
      the carrying of our main point
  21. to succeed in (e.g. a contest); to succeed in; to win.
  22. (obsolete) To get possession of by force; to capture.
  23. To contain; to comprise; have a particular aspect; to show or exhibit
    • 2014, Gregg Olsen and Rebecca Morris, If I Can’t Have You: Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of her Children
      Things of little value carry great importance.
  24. (reflexive) To bear (oneself); to behave or conduct.
    • 1702-1704, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, The History of the Rebellion
      He carried himself so insolently in the house, and out of the house, to all persons, that he became odious.
  25. To bear the charges or burden of holding or having, as stocks, merchandise, etc., from one time to another.
  26. (intransitive) To have a weapon on one’s person; to be armed.
  27. (gaming) To be disproportionately responsible for a team’s success.
    He absolutely carried the game, to the point of killing the entire enemy team by himself.
  28. (Southern US) to physically transport (in the general sense, not necessarily by lifting)
    Will you carry me to town?

Synonyms

  • (lift and bring to somewhere else): bear, move, transport
  • (stock, supply): have, keep, stock, supply
  • (adopt): adopt, take on, take over
  • (have, maintain): have, maintain
  • (be transmitted, travel): be transmitted, travel

Antonyms

  • (in arithmetic): borrow (the equivalent reverse procedure in the inverse operation of subtraction)

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

carry (plural carries)

  1. A manner of transporting or lifting something; the grip or position in which something is carried.
    Adjust your carry from time to time so that you don’t tire too quickly.
  2. A tract of land over which boats or goods are carried between two bodies of navigable water; a portage.
    • 1862, The Atlantic Monthly (volume 10, page 533)
      Undrowned, unducked, as safe from the perils of the broad lake as we had come out of the defiles of the rapids, we landed at the carry below the dam at the lake’s outlet.
  3. (computing) The bit or digit that is carried in an addition operation.
  4. (finance) The benefit or cost of owning an asset over time.
  5. (golf) The distance travelled by the ball when struck, until it hits the ground.
  6. (finance) Carried interest.
  7. (Britain, dialect) The sky; cloud-drift.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Crary


English

Alternative forms

  • poast (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pəʊst/
  • (General American) enPR: pōst, IPA(key): /poʊst/
  • Rhymes: -əʊst

Etymology 1

From Old English post (pillar, door-post) and Latin postis (a post, a door-post) through Old French.

Noun

post (plural posts)

  1. A long dowel or plank protruding from the ground; a fencepost; a lightpost.
  2. (construction) A stud; a two-by-four.
  3. A pole in a battery.
  4. (dentistry) A long, narrow piece inserted into a root canal to provide retention for a crown.
  5. (vocal music, chiefly a cappella) A prolonged final melody note, among moving harmony notes.
  6. (paper, printing) A printing paper size measuring 19.25 inches x 15.5 inches.
  7. (sports) A goalpost.
  8. A location on a basketball court near the basket.
  9. (obsolete) The doorpost of a victualler’s shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a debt.
    • 1600, Samuel Rowlands, The knauve of clubs
      when God ſends coyne,
      I will diſcharge your poaſt
  10. The vertical part of a crochet stitch.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

post (third-person singular simple present posts, present participle posting, simple past and past participle posted)

  1. (transitive) To hang (a notice) in a conspicuous manner for general review.
    Post no bills.
  2. To hold up to public blame or reproach; to advertise opprobriously; to denounce by public proclamation.
    to post someone for cowardice
    • 1732, George Granville, Epilogue to the She-Gallants, line 13
      On Pain of being posted to your Sorrow / Fail not, at Four, to meet me here To-morrow.
  3. (accounting) To carry (an account) from the journal to the ledger.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull, Chapter X
      You have not posted your books these ten years.
  4. To inform; to give the news to; to make acquainted with the details of a subject; often with up.
    • 1872, “Interviewing a Prince”, Saturday Review, London, volume 33, number 853, March 2, page 273
      thoroughly posted up in the politics and literature of the day
  5. (transitive, poker) To pay (a blind).
    Since Jim was new to the game, he had to post $4 in order to receive a hand.
Derived terms
  • poster

Descendants

  • Chinese: po
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Middle French poste, from Italian posta (stopping-place for coaches), feminine of posto (placed, situated).

Noun

post (plural posts)

  1. (obsolete) Each of a series of men stationed at specific places along a postroad, with responsibility for relaying letters and dispatches of the monarch (and later others) along the route. [16th-17th c.]
  2. (dated) A station, or one of a series of stations, established for the refreshment and accommodation of travellers on some recognized route.
    a stage or railway post
  3. A military base; the place at which a soldier or a body of troops is stationed; also, the troops at such a station.
  4. (now historical) Someone who travels express along a set route carrying letters and dispatches; a courier. [from 16th c.]
    • (Can we date this quote?)
      In certain places there be always fresh posts, to carry that further which is brought unto them by the other.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act I, scene iii, line 152
      I fear my Julia would not deign my lines, / Receiving them from such a worthless post.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King: Henry VII and the Dawn of Tudor England, Penguin 2012, p. 199:
      information was filtered through the counting-houses and warehouses of Antwerp; posts galloped along the roads of the Low Countries, while dispatches streamed through Calais, and were passed off the merchant galleys arriving in London from the Flanders ports.
  5. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) An organisation for delivering letters, parcels etc., or the service provided by such an organisation. [from 17th c.]
    sent via post; parcel post
    • 1707, Alexander Pope, Letter VII (to Mr. Wycherly), November 11
      I take it too as an opportunity of sending you the fair copy of the poem on Dullness, which was not then finished, and which I should not care to hazard by the common post.
  6. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) A single delivery of letters; the letters or deliveries that make up a single batch delivered to one person or one address. [from 17th c.]
  7. A message posted in an electronic or Internet forum, or on a blog, etc. [from 20th c.]
  8. (American football) A moderate to deep passing route in which a receiver runs 10-20 yards from the line of scrimmage straight down the field, then cuts toward the middle of the field (towards the facing goalposts) at a 45-degree angle.
    Two of the receivers ran post patterns.
  9. (obsolete) Haste or speed, like that of a messenger or mail carrier.
    • a. 1597, William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act V, scene iii, line 273
      And then in post he came from Mantua.
  10. (obsolete) One who has charge of a station, especially a postal station.
    • 1858, John Gorham Palfrey, History of New England, Volume 1, chapter IV, page 136
      there he held the office of postmaster, or, as it was then called, post, for several years.
Derived terms
Descendants

All are borrowed

Translations

Verb

post (third-person singular simple present posts, present participle posting, simple past and past participle posted)

  1. To travel with relays of horses; to travel by post horses, originally as a courier. [from 16th c.]
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, Frankenstein:
      Beyond Cologne we descended to the plain of Holland; and we resolved to post the remainder of our way […].
  2. To travel quickly; to hurry. [from 16th c.]
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act III, scene vi, line 1
      Post speedily to my lord your husband.
    • c. 1652, John Milton, “On His Blindness”, line 13
      thousand at his bidding speed, / And post o’er land and ocean without rest; / They also serve who only stand and wait.
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To send (an item of mail etc.) through the postal service. [from 19th c.]
    Mail items posted before 7.00pm within the Central Business District and before 5.00pm outside the Central Business District will be delivered the next working day.
  4. (horse-riding) To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the horse, especially in trotting. [from 19th c.]
  5. (Internet) To publish (a message) to a newsgroup, forum, blog, etc. [from 20th c.]
    I couldn’t figure it out, so I posted a question on the mailing list.
Derived terms
  • poster
Translations

Adverb

post (not comparable)

  1. With the post, on post-horses; by a relay of horses (changing at every staging-post); hence, express, with speed, quickly.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well, Act IV, Scene 5,[2]
      His highness comes post from Marseilles,
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 353:
      In this posture were affairs at the inn when a gentleman arrived there post.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Arrest of Lieutenant Golightly’, Plain Tales from the Hills, Folio 2005, p. 93:
      He prided himself on looking neat even when he was riding post.
  2. Sent via the postal service.
Descendants
  • German: posten
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from French poste.

Noun

post (plural posts)

  1. An assigned station; a guard post.
  2. An appointed position in an organization, job.
Translations

Verb

post (third-person singular simple present posts, present participle posting, simple past and past participle posted)

  1. To enter (a name) on a list, as for service, promotion, etc.
  2. To assign to a station; to set; to place.
    Post a sentinel in front of the door.
    • 1839, Thomas De Quincey, Recollections of Grasmere (published in Tait’s Edinburgh Magazine)
      It might be to obtain a ship for a lieutenant, [] or to get him posted.
Translations

Etymology 4

Borrowed from Latin post.

Preposition

post

  1. After; especially after a significant event that has long-term ramifications.
    • 2008, Michael Tomasky, “Obama cannot let the right cast him in that 60s show”, The Guardian, online,
      One of the most appealing things for me about Barack Obama has always been that he comes post the post-60s generation.
    • 2008, Matthew Stevens, “Lew pressured to reveal what he knows”, The Australian, online,
      Lew reckons he had three options for the cash-cow which was Premier post the Coles sale.

Etymology 5

Clipping of post-production.

Noun

post (uncountable)

  1. (film, informal) Post-production.

See also

  • post-

Etymology 6

Clipping of post mortem

Noun

post (plural posts)

  1. (medicine, informal) A post mortem (investigation of body’s cause of death).
    • 2010, Sandra Glahn, Informed Consent (page 306)
      I gotta run. Yes, send the kid to the morgue. We’ll do a post on Monday.

Anagrams

  • OTPs, POTS, PTOs, Spot, TPOs, opts, pots, spot, stop, tops

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan, from Latin postus, from positus.

Verb

post

  1. past participle of pondre

Cimbrian

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian posta.

Noun

post f (Luserna)

  1. post (method of delivering mail)
  2. post office

Derived terms

  • postkart

References

  • “post” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Cornish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [poːst]

Noun

post m (plural postow)

  1. post (method of sending mail)

Related terms

  • lytherva
  • postya
  • sodhva an post

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔst/, [ˈpʰʌsd̥]

Etymology 1

Via French poste m from Italian posto (post, location), from Latin positus (position), from the verb pōnō (to place).

Noun

post c (singular definite posten, plural indefinite poster)

  1. post (position, job)
Inflection

Derived terms

  • postere
  • vagtpost

Etymology 2

Via French poste f from Italian posta (stopping-place, post office), from Latin posita, the past participle of pōnō (to place).

Noun

post c (singular definite posten, not used in plural form)

  1. post, mail (letters or packages)
  2. post, mail (a public institution distributing letters or packages)
  3. postman (a person carrying letters or packages)
Inflection

Derived terms

  • postbud
  • postkontor

Etymology 3

Via French poste f from Italian posta (stopping-place, post office), from Latin posita, the past participle of pōnō (to place).

Noun

post c (singular definite posten, plural indefinite poster)

  1. entry (in a budget)
Inflection

Derived terms

  • postere

Etymology 4

Via Middle Low German post from Latin postis (post, door-post).

Noun

post c (singular definite posten, plural indefinite poster)

  1. pump, tap, faucet (an outdoor water pump)
  2. (rare, in compounds) post (supporting a door or a window)
Inflection

Derived terms

  • dørpost
  • vandpost
  • vinduespost

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔst/
  • Hyphenation: post
  • Rhymes: -ɔst

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle French poste, from Italian posta.

Noun

post f or m (plural posten, diminutive postje n)

  1. Mail.
  2. A mail office, a post office.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: pos
  • Indonesian: pos
    • Petjo: pos
  • Papiamentu: pòst

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French poste, from Italian posto.

Noun

post f or m (plural posten, diminutive postje n)

  1. A location or station, where a soldier is supposed to be; position.
  2. A post, a position, an office.
    Toekomstig Amerikaans president Barack Obama maakt zijn keuzes bekend voor de posten binnen zijn kabinet op het gebied van veiligheid en buitenlands beleid. — President elect Barack Obama makes his choices known for the posts within his cabinet in the area of security and exterior policy. (nl.wikipedia, 12/3/2008)
Derived terms
  • grenspost
  • handelspost
  • legerpost
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: pos
  • Indonesian: pos

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

post

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of posten
  2. imperative of posten

Anagrams

  • spot, stop

Esperanto

Etymology

From Latin post.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /post/
  • Hyphenation: post

Preposition

post

  1. after
  2. behind

French

Etymology

From English post.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔst/

Noun

post m (plural posts)

  1. (Internet) post (message on a blog, etc.)

Irish

Alternative forms

  • posta (Cois Fharraige)

Etymology

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pˠɔsˠt̪ˠ]

Noun

post m (genitive singular poist, nominative plural poist)

  1. timber post, stake
  2. (historical) post, letter carrier; (letter) post; postman
  3. (military) post
  4. (of employment) post, job

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • “post” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “post” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “post” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɔst/

Noun

post m (invariable)

  1. (Internet) post (message in a forum)

Anagrams

  • spot, stop

Latin

Etymology

From earlier poste, from Proto-Italic *posti, from Proto-Indo-European *pósti, from *pós. Related to pōne.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /post/, [pɔs̠t̪]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /post/, [pɔst̪]

Preposition

post (+ accusative)

  1. (of space) behind
  2. (of time) after, since, (transf.) besides, except

Adverb

post (not comparable)

  1. (of space) behind, back, backwards
  2. (of time) afterwards, after

Antonyms

  • (before): ante

Derived terms

  • post-
  • poster/ posterus
  • postīcus

Descendants

References

  • post in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • post in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • post in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • post in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume III, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 841

Latvian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [puôst]

Verb

post (tr., 1st conj., pres. pošu, pos, poš, past posu)

  1. tidy, clean, adorn
  2. dress up, smarten
Conjugation

Mòcheno

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian posta.

Noun

post f

  1. post (method of delivering mail)
  2. post office

Derived terms

  • postkòrt

References

  • “post” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

Northern Kurdish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /poːst/

Noun

post m

  1. skin

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Italian posta (in the given sense)

Noun

post m (definite singular posten, indefinite plural poster, definite plural postene)

  1. post or mail (letters etc. sent via the postal service)

Derived terms

References

  • “post” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Italian posta (in this sense)

Noun

post m (definite singular posten, indefinite plural postar, definite plural postane)

  1. post or mail (letters etc. sent via the postal service)

Derived terms

References

  • “post” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Latin postis (post, pedestal).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /post/

Noun

post m

  1. post
  2. pedestal

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: post, poste
    • English: post
      • German: Post
    • Scots: post, poist

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔst/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *postъ.

Noun

post m inan

  1. fast

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verb) pościć impf
  • (adjective) postny

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English post.

Noun

post m anim

  1. post (message)

Declension

Further reading

  • post in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • post in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈpowst͡ʃ/, /ˈpost͡ʃ/

Noun

post m (plural posts)

  1. (Internet) post (individual message in an on-line discussion)

Romanian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *postъ.

Noun

post n (plural posturi)

  1. fast (period of abstaining from or eating very little food), fasting

Related terms

  • posti

See also

  • păresimi
  • Postul Mare

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French poste.

Noun

post n (plural posturi)

  1. post, position, job, place, appointment, station

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʰɔs̪t̪/

Noun

post m (genitive singular puist, plural puist)

  1. post, mail
  2. Alternative form of posta
  3. post, stake

Derived terms

  • cairt-phuist
  • post-bàire
  • post-dealain

Verb

post (past phost, future postaidh, verbal noun postadh, past participle poste)

  1. post, mail

Mutation


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *postъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pôːst/

Noun

pȏst m (Cyrillic spelling по̑ст)

  1. fast, fasting

Declension


Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔ́st/

Noun

pȍst m inan

  1. fast (act or practice of abstaining from or eating very little food)

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English post. Doublet of puesto.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpost/, [ˈpost̪]

Noun

post m (plural posts)

  1. (computing) post

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English post.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔst/
  • Rhymes: -ɔst

Noun

post c

  1. postal office; an organization delivering mail and parcels
  2. (uncountable) mail; collectively for things sent through a post office
  3. item of a list or on an agenda
  4. post; an assigned station
  5. position to which someone may be assigned or elected
    Posten som ordförande i idrottsföreningen är vakant.

    The position as chairman in the sports association is free.

Declension

Related terms

  • posta
  • postkontor
  • postlåda
  • Posten

Anagrams

  • stop

Tagalog

Etymology

Borrowed English post.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /poust/, [poʊst]

Noun

post

  1. (computing, Internet) post

Derived terms


Turkish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [post]

Noun

post (definite accusative postu, plural postlar)

  1. fur, hide, pelt
    Synonym: kürk

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /poːsd/, [pʰoːst]
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /pɔsd/, [pʰɔst]

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English post.

Noun

post m (uncountable)

  1. post, mail
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Latin postis.

Noun

post m (plural pyst)

  1. post, pillar
Derived terms
  • mynegbost (signpost)
Alternative forms
  • postyn

Mutation

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