carry vs stock what difference

what is difference between carry and stock

English

Etymology

From Middle English carrien, from Anglo-Norman carier (modern French charrier); from a derivative of Latin carrus (four-wheeled baggage wagon), ultimately of Gaulish origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæ.ɹi/ or (Marymarrymerry merger) IPA(key): /ˈkɛ.ɹi/
  • Rhymes: -æri
  • Homophones: Carrie, Cary

Verb

carry (third-person singular simple present carries, present participle carrying, simple past and past participle carried)

  1. (transitive) To lift (something) and take it to another place; to transport (something) by lifting.
  2. To notionally transfer from one place (such as a country, book, or column) to another.
  3. To convey by extension or continuance; to extend.
  4. (transitive, chiefly archaic) To move; to convey using force
    Synonyms: impel, conduct
  5. to lead or guide.
    • Passion and revenge will carry them too far.
  6. (transitive) To stock or supply (something); to have in store.
  7. (transitive) To adopt (something); take (something) over.
  8. (transitive) To adopt or resolve on, especially in a deliberative assembly
  9. (transitive, arithmetic) In an addition, to transfer the quantity in excess of what is countable in the units in a column to the column immediately to the left in order to be added there.
  10. (transitive) To have, hold, possess or maintain (something).
  11. (intransitive) To be transmitted; to travel.
  12. (slang, transitive) To insult, to diss.
  13. (transitive, nautical) To capture a ship by coming alongside and boarding.
  14. (transitive, sports) To transport (the ball) whilst maintaining possession.
  15. (transitive) To have on one’s person.
  16. To be pregnant (with).
  17. To have propulsive power; to propel.
  18. To hold the head; said of a horse.
  19. (hunting) To have earth or frost stick to the feet when running, as a hare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  20. To bear or uphold successfully through conflict, for example a leader or principle
    • 1708, Joseph Addison, The Present State of the War, and the Necessity of an Augmentation
      the carrying of our main point
  21. to succeed in (e.g. a contest); to succeed in; to win.
  22. (obsolete) To get possession of by force; to capture.
  23. To contain; to comprise; have a particular aspect; to show or exhibit
    • 2014, Gregg Olsen and Rebecca Morris, If I Can’t Have You: Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of her Children
      Things of little value carry great importance.
  24. (reflexive) To bear (oneself); to behave or conduct.
    • 1702-1704, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, The History of the Rebellion
      He carried himself so insolently in the house, and out of the house, to all persons, that he became odious.
  25. To bear the charges or burden of holding or having, as stocks, merchandise, etc., from one time to another.
  26. (intransitive) To have a weapon on one’s person; to be armed.
  27. (gaming) To be disproportionately responsible for a team’s success.
    He absolutely carried the game, to the point of killing the entire enemy team by himself.
  28. (Southern US) to physically transport (in the general sense, not necessarily by lifting)
    Will you carry me to town?

Synonyms

  • (lift and bring to somewhere else): bear, move, transport
  • (stock, supply): have, keep, stock, supply
  • (adopt): adopt, take on, take over
  • (have, maintain): have, maintain
  • (be transmitted, travel): be transmitted, travel

Antonyms

  • (in arithmetic): borrow (the equivalent reverse procedure in the inverse operation of subtraction)

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

carry (plural carries)

  1. A manner of transporting or lifting something; the grip or position in which something is carried.
    Adjust your carry from time to time so that you don’t tire too quickly.
  2. A tract of land over which boats or goods are carried between two bodies of navigable water; a portage.
    • 1862, The Atlantic Monthly (volume 10, page 533)
      Undrowned, unducked, as safe from the perils of the broad lake as we had come out of the defiles of the rapids, we landed at the carry below the dam at the lake’s outlet.
  3. (computing) The bit or digit that is carried in an addition operation.
  4. (finance) The benefit or cost of owning an asset over time.
  5. (golf) The distance travelled by the ball when struck, until it hits the ground.
  6. (finance) Carried interest.
  7. (Britain, dialect) The sky; cloud-drift.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Crary


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: stŏk, IPA(key): /stɒk/
  • (US) enPR: stäk, IPA(key): /stɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk
  • Homophone: stalk (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Old English stocc, from Proto-Germanic *stukkaz (tree-trunk), with modern senses mostly referring either to the trunk from which the tree grows (figuratively, its origin and/or support/foundation), or to a piece of wood, stick, or rod. The senses of “supply” and “raw material” arose from a probable conflation with steck (an item of goods, merchandise) or the use of split tally sticks consisting of foil or counterfoil and stock to capture paid taxes, debts or exchanges. Doublet of chock.

Noun

stock (countable and uncountable, plural stocks or (obsolete) stocken)

  1. A store or supply.
    1. (operations) A store of goods ready for sale; inventory.
    2. A supply of anything ready for use.
    3. Railroad rolling stock.
    4. (card games, in a card game) A stack of undealt cards made available to the players.
    5. Farm or ranch animals; livestock.
    6. The population of a given type of animal (especially fish) available to be captured from the wild for economic use.
  2. (finance) The capital raised by a company through the issue of shares. The total of shares held by an individual shareholder.
    1. The price or value of the stock for a company on the stock market.
    2. (figuratively) The measure of how highly a person or institution is valued.
    3. Any of several types of security that are similar to a stock, or marketed like one.
  3. The raw material from which things are made; feedstock.
    1. (cooking, uncountable, countable) Broth made from meat (originally bones) or vegetables, used as a basis for stew or soup.
    2. The type of paper used in printing.
    3. Ellipsis of film stock
    4. Plain soap before it is coloured and perfumed.
  4. Stock theater, summer stock theater.
  5. The trunk and woody main stems of a tree. The base from which something grows or branches.
    1. (horticulture) The plant upon which the scion is grafted.
    2. lineage, family, ancestry.
      1. (linguistics) A larger grouping of language families: a superfamily or macrofamily.
  6. Any of the several species of cruciferous flowers in the genus Matthiola.
  7. A handle or stem to which the working part of an implement or weapon is attached.
    1. (firearms) The part of a rifle or shotgun that rests against the shooter’s shoulder.
    2. The handle of a whip, fishing rod, etc.
  8. Part of a machine that supports items or holds them in place.
    1. The headstock of a lathe, drill, etc.
    2. The tailstock of a lathe.
  9. A bar, stick or rod.
    1. A ski pole.
    2. (nautical) A bar going through an anchor, perpendicular to the flukes.
    3. (nautical) The axle attached to the rudder, which transfers the movement of the helm to the rudder.
    4. (geology) A pipe (vertical cylinder of ore)
  10. A type of (now formal or official) neckwear.
    1. A necktie or cravat, particularly a wide necktie popular in the eighteenth century, often seen today as a part of formal wear for horse riding competitions.
    2. A piece of black cloth worn under a clerical collar.
  11. A bed for infants; a crib, cot, or cradle
  12. (folklore) A piece of wood magically made to be just like a real baby and substituted for it by magical beings.
  13. (obsolete) A cover for the legs; a stocking.
  14. A block of wood; something fixed and solid; a pillar; a firm support; a post.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The History of Waltham Abbey
      Item, for a stock of brass for the holy water, seven shillings; which, by the canon, must be of marble or metal, and in no case of brick.
  15. (by extension, obsolete) A person who is as dull and lifeless as a stock or post; one who has little sense.
  16. (Britain, historical) The longest part of a split tally stick formerly struck in the exchequer, which was delivered to the person who had lent the king money on account, as the evidence of indebtedness.
  17. (shipbuilding, in the plural) The frame or timbers on which a ship rests during construction.
  18. (Britain, in the plural) Red and grey bricks, used for the exterior of walls and the front of buildings.
  19. (biology) In tectology, an aggregate or colony of individuals, such as trees, chains of salpae, etc.
  20. The beater of a fulling mill.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (farm or ranch animals): livestock
  • (railroad equipment): rolling stock
  • (raw material): feedstock
  • (paper for printing): card stock
  • (plant used in grafting): rootstock, understock
  • (axle attached to rudder): rudder stock
  • (wide necktie): stock-tie
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

stock (third-person singular simple present stocks, present participle stocking, simple past and past participle stocked)

  1. To have on hand for sale.
  2. To provide with material requisites; to store; to fill; to supply.
  3. To allow (cows) to retain milk for twenty-four hours or more prior to sale.
  4. To put in the stocks as punishment.
  5. (nautical) To fit (an anchor) with a stock, or to fasten the stock firmly in place.
  6. (card games, dated) To arrange cards in a certain manner for cheating purposes; to stack the deck.
Translations

Adjective

stock (not comparable)

  1. Of a type normally available for purchase/in stock.
    stock items
    stock sizes
  2. (racing, of a race car) Having the same configuration as cars sold to the non-racing public, or having been modified from such a car.
  3. Straightforward, ordinary, just another, very basic.
    That band is quite stock
    He gave me a stock answer
Translations

See also

  • DJIA
  • foodstock

Etymology 2

From Italian stoccata.

Noun

stock (plural stocks)

  1. A thrust with a rapier; a stoccado.

Anagrams

  • ‘tocks, tocks

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English stock.

Pronunciation

Noun

stock m (plural stocks, diminutive stockje n)

  1. stock, goods in supply
  2. basic capital
  3. shares (equity)

Derived terms

  • stockdividend n

References

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English stock.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɔk/

Noun

stock m (plural stocks)

  1. stock, goods in supply
  2. stock, a reserve (generally)
  3. Supply of (wild) fish available for commerce, stock

Derived terms

  • en rupture de stock
  • stocker
  • stockage

Further reading

  • “stock” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English stock.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɔk/

Noun

stock

  1. stock, goods in supply, inventory

References


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English stock.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈtok/, [esˈt̪ok]

Noun

stock m (plural stocks)

  1. stock, inventory

Further reading

  • “stock” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish stokker, from Old Norse stokkr, from Proto-Germanic *stukkaz (tree-trunk).

Noun

stock c

  1. a log (trunk of a dead tree)
  2. a stock (of a gun)
  3. a pack of snus, usually ten, wrapped in plastic film or packed in a light cardboard box
    Synonyms: rulle, limpa

Declension

Related terms

  • ekstock
  • stocka
  • stockeld
  • Stockholm
  • stockning
  • timmerstock

See also

  • balk
  • bjälke
  • flottning
  • stam
  • stuga
  • timmer
  • virke

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