case vs subject what difference

what is difference between case and subject

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /keɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs
  • Hyphenation: case

Etymology 1

Middle English cas, from Old French cas (an event), from Latin cāsus (a falling, a fall; accident, event, occurrence; occasion, opportunity; noun case), perfect passive participle of cadō (to fall, to drop).

Noun

case (plural cases)

  1. An actual event, situation, or fact.
  2. (now rare) A given condition or state.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.10:
      Ne wist he how to turne, nor to what place: / Was never wretched man in such a wofull cace.
    • 1726, Nathan Bailey, John Worlidge, Dictionarium Rusticum, Urbanicum & Botanicum
      Mares which are over-fat, hold with much difficulty; whereas those that are but in good case and plump, conceive with the greatest readiness and ease.
  3. A piece of work, specifically defined within a profession.
  4. (academia) An instance or event as a topic of study.
  5. (law) A legal proceeding, lawsuit.
  6. (grammar) A specific inflection of a word depending on its function in the sentence.
    • Now, the Subject of either an indicative or a subjunctive Clause is always assigned Nominative case, as we see from:
      (16) (a)   I know [that they/*them/*their leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      (16) (b)   I demand [that they/*them/*their leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      By contrast, the Subject of an infinitive Clause is assigned Objective case, as we see from:
      (17)   I want [them/*they/*their to leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      And the Subject of a gerund Clause is assigned either Objective or Genitive case: cf.
      (18)   I don’t like the idea of [them/their/*they leaving for Hawaii tomorrow]
  7. (grammar, uncountable) Grammatical cases and their meanings taken either as a topic in general or within a specific language.
  8. (medicine) An instance of a specific condition or set of symptoms.
  9. (programming) A section of code representing one of the actions of a conditional switch.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
  • court case
  • See also Thesaurus:grammatical case
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

case (third-person singular simple present cases, present participle casing, simple past and past participle cased)

  1. (obsolete) to propose hypothetical cases

See also

  • Appendix:Grammatical cases

References

  • case on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English cas, from Old Northern French casse, (compare Old French chasse (box, chest, case)), from Latin capsa (box, bookcase), from capiō (to take, seize, hold). Doublet of cash.

Noun

case (plural cases)

  1. A box that contains or can contain a number of identical items of manufacture.
  2. A box, sheath, or covering generally.
  3. A piece of luggage that can be used to transport an apparatus such as a sewing machine.
  4. An enclosing frame or casing.
  5. A suitcase.
  6. A piece of furniture, constructed partially of transparent glass or plastic, within which items can be displayed.
  7. The outer covering or framework of a piece of apparatus such as a computer.
  8. (printing, historical) A shallow tray divided into compartments or “boxes” for holding type, traditionally arranged in sets of two, the “upper case” (containing capitals, small capitals, accented) and “lower case” (small letters, figures, punctuation marks, quadrats, and spaces).
  9. (typography, by extension) The nature of a piece of alphabetic type, whether a “capital” (upper case) or “small” (lower case) letter.
  10. (poker slang) Four of a kind.
  11. (US) A unit of liquid measure used to measure sales in the beverage industry, equivalent to 192 fluid ounces.
  12. (mining) A small fissure which admits water into the workings.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  13. A thin layer of harder metal on the surface of an object whose deeper metal is allowed to remain soft.
  14. A cardboard box that holds (usually 24) beer bottles or cans.
    Synonym: carton
Hyponyms
Translations
References
  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. →ISBN

Adjective

case (not comparable)

  1. (poker slang) The last remaining card of a particular rank.
    • 2006, David Apostolico, Lessons from the Professional Poker Tour (page 21)
      If he did have a bigger ace, I still had at least six outs — the case ace, two nines, and three tens. I could also have more outs if he held anything less than A-K.
References
  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. →ISBN

Verb

case (third-person singular simple present cases, present participle casing, simple past and past participle cased)

  1. (transitive) To place (an item or items of manufacture) into a box, as in preparation for shipment.
  2. (transitive) To cover or protect with, or as if with, a case; to enclose.
    • The man who, cased in steel, had passed whole days and nights in the saddle.
  3. (transitive, informal) To survey (a building or other location) surreptitiously, as in preparation for a robbery.
    • 1977, Michael Innes, The Gay Phoenix, →ISBN, page 116:
      You are in the grounds of Brockholes Abbey, a house into which a great deal of valuable property has just been moved. And your job is to case the joint for a break in.
    • 2014, Amy Goodman, From COINTELPRO to Snowden, the FBI Burglars Speak Out After 43 Years of Silence (Part 2), Democracy Now!, January 8, 2014, 0:49 to 0:57:
      Bonnie worked as a daycare director. She helped case the FBI office by posing as a college student interested in becoming an FBI agent.
Translations
Derived terms
  • case the deck

Anagrams

  • ACEs, ASCE, Aces, Ceas, ESCA, SCEA, aces, aesc, esca, æsc

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ħʌˈse/
  • Hyphenation: ca‧se

Verb

casé

  1. (transitive) hit

Conjugation

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 263

Asturian

Verb

case

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of casar

Chinese

Alternative forms

  • K士

Etymology

Borrowed from English case.

Pronunciation

Noun

case

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) case (clarification of this definition is needed)
    • 2015, 區瑞強, 我們都是這樣唱大的 II:《承先啟後》李克勤
      呢個好多case㗎。呢一個,就係張國榮,有噉個case啦。 [Cantonese, trad.]
      呢个好多case㗎。呢一个,就系张国荣,有噉个case啦。 [Cantonese, simp.]

      ni1 go3 hou2 do1 kei1 si2 gaa3. ni1 jat1 go3, zau6 hai6 zoeng1 gwok3 wing4, jau5 gam2 go3 kei1 si2 laa1. [Jyutping]
      That kind of case happens often. It happened with Leslie Cheung.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin casa, in the sense of “hut, cabin”. The other senses are a semantic loan from Spanish casa. Doublet of chez, which was inherited.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɑz/
  • Homophone: cases

Noun

case f (plural cases)

  1. (archaic, rare or regional) hut, cabin, shack
  2. box (on form)
  3. square (on board game)

Derived terms

  • avoir une case en moins
  • case départ
  • case à cocher
  • manquer une case
  • retour à la case départ

Further reading

  • “case” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • à sec

Galician

Alternative forms

  • caixe

Etymology

Attested since the 15th century (quasy), from Latin quasi (as if).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈkɑsɪ]

Adverb

case

  1. almost

References

  • “quasy” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “case” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “case” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “case” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ca‧se

Noun

case f

  1. plural of casa

Anagrams

  • asce, esca, seca

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡sasɛ/, [ˈt͡sasə]

Noun

case

  1. nominative/accusative plural of cas

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *kāsi, from late Proto-West Germanic *kāsī, borrowed from Latin cāseus.

Noun

câse m or n

  1. cheese

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms

  • kese (eastern)

Descendants

  • Dutch: kaas
    • Afrikaans: kaas
      • Sotho: kase
      • Tswana: kase
    • Berbice Creole Dutch: kasi
    • Jersey Dutch: kääs
    • Negerhollands: kaas, kaes
    • Papiamentu: keshi (from the diminutive)
    • Sranan Tongo: kasi
  • Limburgish: kieës, kees

Further reading

  • “case”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “case (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

English case, from Latin cāsus. Doublet of kasus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɛɪ̯s/, /kæɪ̯s/

Noun

case m or n (definite singular casen or caset, indefinite plural caser, definite plural casene)

  1. a case study; a case as used in a case study

References

  • “case” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “case_2” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

English case, from Latin cāsus. Doublet of kasus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɛɪ̯s/, /kæɪ̯s/ (examples of pronunciation)

Noun

case m or n (definite singular casen or caset, indefinite plural casar or case, definite plural casane or casa)

  1. a case study; a case as used in a case study
    Synonyms: døme, eksempel

References

  • “case” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Noun

case m (oblique plural cases, nominative singular cases, nominative plural case)

  1. (grammar) case

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ca‧se
  • Rhymes: -azi, -azɨ

Verb

case

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of casar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of casar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of casar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of casar

Romanian

Noun

case

  1. plural of casă

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkase/, [ˈka.se]

Verb

case

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of casar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of casar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of casar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of casar.

Venetian

Noun

case

  1. plural of casa


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English subget, from Old French suget, from Latin subiectus (lying under or near, adjacent, also subject, exposed), as a noun, subiectus (a subject, an inferior), subiectum (the subject of a proposition), past participle of subiciō (throw, lay, place), from sub (under, at the foot of) + iaciō (throw, hurl), as a calque of Ancient Greek ὑποκείμενον (hupokeímenon).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sŭbʹjĕkt, IPA(key): /ˈsʌb.dʒɛkt/
  • (also) (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈsʌb.dʒɪkt/
  • Hyphenation: sub‧ject

Adjective

subject (comparative more subject, superlative most subject)

  1. Likely to be affected by or to experience something.
    • c. 1678 (written), 1682 (published), John Dryden, Mac Flecknoe
      All human things are subject to decay.
  2. Conditional upon something; used with to.
  3. Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.
  4. Placed under the power of another; owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state.
    • , Book I
      Esau was never subject to Jacob.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Latin subiectus (a subject, an inferior), subiectum (the subject of a proposition), past participle of subiciō (throw, lay, place), from sub (under, at the foot of) + iaciō (throw, hurl).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sŭbʹjĕkt, IPA(key): /ˈsʌb.dʒɛkt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈsʌb.dʒɪkt/
  • Hyphenation: sub‧ject

Noun

subject (plural subjects)

  1. (grammar) In a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) about whom the statement is made. In active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.
  2. An actor; one who takes action.
    The subjects and objects of power.
  3. The main topic of a paper, work of art, discussion, field of study, etc.
    • Make choice of a subject beautifull and noble, which [] shall [] afford [] an ample field of matter wherein to expatiate itself.
  4. A particular area of study.
  5. A citizen in a monarchy.
  6. A person ruled over by another, especially a monarch or state authority.
  7. (music) The main theme or melody, especially in a fugue.
    • 1878, William Smith Rockstro, “Subject” in A Dictionary of Music and Musicians
      The earliest known form of subject is the ecclesiastical cantus firmus, or plain song.
  8. A human, animal or an inanimate object that is being examined, treated, analysed, etc.
    • 1748, Conyers Middleton, Life of Cicero
      Writers of particular lives [] are apt to be prejudiced in favour of their subject.
  9. (philosophy) A being that has subjective experiences, subjective consciousness, or a relationship with another entity.
  10. (logic) That of which something is stated.
  11. (mathematics) The variable in terms of which an expression is defined.
Synonyms
  • (discussion): matter, topic
Derived terms
  • between-subjects
  • subject matter
  • subject title
  • subjective
  • within-subjects
Translations
See also
  • object
  • predicate

Etymology 3

From Medieval Latin subiectō, iterative of subiciō (throw, lay, place), from sub (under, at the foot of) + iaciō (throw, hurl).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: səb-jĕktʹ, IPA(key): /səbˈdʒɛkt/, /sʌbˈdʒɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb

subject (third-person singular simple present subjects, present participle subjecting, simple past and past participle subjected)

  1. (transitive, construed with to) To cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.
    I came here to buy souvenirs, not to be subjected to a tirade of abuse!
  2. (transitive) To make subordinate or subservient; to subdue or enslave.

Synonyms

  • underbring

Translations

Further reading

  • subject in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • subject in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • subject at OneLook Dictionary Search

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial