casual vs chance what difference

what is difference between casual and chance

English

Alternative forms

  • casuall (obsolete)
  • (shortening, informal) cazh

Etymology

From Middle French casuel, from Late Latin cāsuālis (happening by chance), from Latin cāsus (event) (English case), from cadere (to fall) (whence English cadence).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkaʒuəl/, /ˈkaʒjuəl/, /ˈkazjuəl/, /ˈkaʒəl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkæʒuəl/, /ˈkæʒwəl/, /ˈkæʒəl/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ˈkɛʒʉɘl/, /ˈkɛʒɘl/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /-uæl/
  • Hyphenation: ca‧su‧al, cas‧ual, casu‧al

Adjective

casual (comparative more casual, superlative most casual)

  1. Happening by chance.
    • casual breaks, in the general system
  2. Coming without regularity; occasional or incidental.
    • a constant habit, rather than a casual gesture
  3. Employed irregularly.
  4. Careless.
    • 2007, Nick Holland, The Girl on the Bus (page 117)
      I removed my jacket and threw it casually over the back of the settee.
  5. Happening or coming to pass without design.
    • 2012, Jeff Miller, Grown at Glen Garden: Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson, and the Little Texas Golf Course that Propelled Them to Stardom
      Hogan assumed the entire creek bed was to be played as a casual hazard, moved his ball out and assessed himself a one-stroke penalty.
  6. Informal, relaxed.
  7. Designed for informal or everyday use.

Synonyms

  • (happening by chance): accidental, fortuitous, incidental, occasional, random; see also Thesaurus:accidental
  • (happening or coming to pass without design): unexpected
  • (relaxed; everyday use): informal

Antonyms

  • (happening by chance): inevitable, necessary
  • (happening or coming to pass without design): expected, scheduled
  • (relaxed; everyday use): ceremonial, formal

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

casual (plural casuals)

  1. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) A worker who is only working for a company occasionally, not as its permanent employee.
  2. A soldier temporarily at a place of duty, usually en route to another place of duty.
  3. (Britain) A member of a group of football hooligans who wear expensive designer clothing to avoid police attention; see casual (subculture).
  4. One who receives relief for a night in a parish to which he does not belong; a vagrant.
  5. (video games, informal, derogatory) A player of casual games.
  6. (fandom slang) A person whose engagement with media is relaxed or superficial.
    • 1972, Lee C. Garrison, “The Needs of Motion Picture Audiences”, California Management Review, Volume 15, Issue 2, Winter 1972, page 149:
      Casuals outnumbered regulars in the art-house audience two to one.
    • 2010, Jennifer Gillan, Television and New Media: Must-Click TV, page 16:
      Most often, when a series is marketed toward casuals, the loyals feel that their interests and needs are not being met.
    • 2018, E. J. Nielsen, “The Gay Elephant Meta in the Room: Sherlock and the Johnlock Conspiracy”, in Queerbaiting and Fandom: Teasing Fans Through Homoerotic Possibilities (ed. Joseph Brennan), page 91:
      Treating a gay relationship as a puzzle that must be pursued by the clever viewers and hidden from “casuals” until a narrative reveal at the eleventh hour seems antithetical to the idea of normalized representation that TJLCers claim as the main reason they want Johnlock to be canon, []
  7. (Britain, dated) A tramp.

Translations

Related terms

  • casualty
  • case

References

  • casual in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Calusa, casula, causal

Catalan

Adjective

casual (masculine and feminine plural casuals)

  1. casual
  2. unplanned

Derived terms

  • casualitat
  • casualment

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ca‧su‧al
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Adjective

casual m or f (plural casuais, comparable)

  1. casual (happening by chance)
    Synonym: fortuito
  2. casual (coming without regularity)
    Synonym: ocasional
  3. casual (designed for informal or everyday use)

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -al

Adjective

casual (plural casuales)

  1. casual
  2. accidental
  3. coincidental, chance

Derived terms

  • casualmente

Descendants

  • Cebuano: kaswal

Further reading

  • “casual” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Alternative forms

  • chaunce (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃæns/
    • (US, Canada) IPA(key): [tʃʰɛəns], [tʃʰeəns]
    • (Northern England, General Australian, Ireland) IPA(key): [tʃʰæns], [tʃʰans]
  • IPA(key): /tʃɑːns/
    • (Received Pronunciation, Cockney) IPA(key): [tʃʰɑːns]
    • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): [tʃʰɐːns]
    • (Indian English) IPA(key): [tʃɑːns]
  • Rhymes: -ɑːns, -æns

Etymology 1

From Middle English chance, cheance, chaunce, cheaunce, a borrowing from Old French chance (accident, chance, luck), from Vulgar Latin *cadentia (falling), from Latin cadere (to fall, to die, to happen, occur). Doublet of cadence and cadenza.

Noun

chance (countable and uncountable, plural chances)

  1. (countable) An opportunity or possibility.
  2. (uncountable) Random occurrence; luck.
  3. (countable) The probability of something happening.
  4. (countable, archaic) What befalls or happens to a person; their lot or fate.
Synonyms
  • (random occurrence): fortune, hap; see also Thesaurus:luck
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

chance (not comparable)

  1. Happening by chance, casual.
    • 1859, Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, ch. VI, The Shoe Maker (Heron Book Centennial Edition)
      No crowd was about the door; no people were discernible at any of the many windows; not even a chance passer-by was in the street. An unnatural silence and desertion reigned there.
Translations

Adverb

chance (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Perchance; perhaps.

Etymology 2

From Middle English chancen, chauncen, from the noun (see above).

Verb

chance (third-person singular simple present chances, present participle chancing, simple past and past participle chanced)

  1. (archaic, intransitive) To happen by chance, to occur.
    • if a bird’s nest chance to be before thee
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. XV, Practical — Devotional
      Once [] it chanced that Geoffrey Riddell Bishop of Ely, a Prelate rather troublesome to our Abbot, made a request of him for timber from his woods towards certain edifices going on at Glemsford.
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter XVIII
      Mr. Mason, shivering as some one chanced to open the door, asked for more coal to be put on the fire, which had burnt out its flame, though its mass of cinder still shone hot and red. The footman who brought the coal, in going out, stopped near Mr. Eshton’s chair, and said something to him in a low voice, of which I heard only the words, “old woman,”—”quite troublesome.”
  2. (archaic, transitive) To befall; to happen to.
  3. To try or risk.
    Shall we carry the umbrella, or chance a rainstorm?
    • 1890, William Dean Howells, A Hazard of New Fortunes
      He does chance it in stocks, but he’s always played on the square, if you call stocks gambling.
  4. To discover something by chance.
  5. (Belize) To rob, cheat or swindle someone.
Synonyms
  • (to happen) come to pass, occur, transpire; See also Thesaurus:happen
  • (to happen to)
  • (to try) test
  • (to discover something) come across, come on, come upon, encounter, stumble upon
  • (to cheat someone) deceive, fool, trick; See also Thesaurus:deceive
Derived terms
  • bechance
  • chance on
  • chance one’s arm
  • chance upon
Translations

References

  • chance in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “chance”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • Canche

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from French chance, from Vulgar Latin *cadentia (falling), from Latin cadō (I fall, I die).

Pronunciation

IPA(key): [ˈɕɑŋsə]

Noun

chance c (singular definite chancen, plural indefinite chancer)

  1. A chance

Antonyms

  • risiko

French

Etymology

From Old French chance, cheance (accident, chance, luck), from Vulgar Latin *cadentia (falling), from Latin cadēns, from cadō (I fall, I die). Doublet of cadence, borrowed from Italian.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃɑ̃s/
  • Rhymes: -ɑ̃s

Noun

chance f (plural chances)

  1. chance
  2. luck

Antonyms

  • adversité
  • guigne (familiar)
  • malchance
  • malheur

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Dutch: kans
  • Dutch: sjans
  • German: Chance
  • Persian: شانس(šâns)
  • Polish: szansa
  • Romanian: șansă
  • Turkish: şans

Related terms

  • choir

Further reading

  • “chance” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Alternative forms

  • scians

Etymology

Borrowed from French chance. Doublet of cadenza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): */ˈʃans/

Noun

chance f (invariable)

  1. chance (possibility of a certain outcome)

Old French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *cadentia (falling), from Latin cadēns, from cadō (I fall, I die).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʃan.tsə/

Noun

chance f (oblique plural chances, nominative singular chance, nominative plural chances)

  1. chance; fate
  2. (rare) a throw of a die

Related terms

  • cheoir

Descendants

  • English: chance
    • Japanese: チャンス (chansu) (borrowed)
  • French: chance
    • Danish: chance
    • Italian: chance
    • Portuguese: chance
    • Romanian: șansă
    • Spanish: chance
    • Turkish: şans

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (cheance, supplement)
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (chance)
  • chance on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from French chance. Doublet of cadência.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: chan‧ce

Noun

chance f (plural chances)

  1. probability
  2. chance, opportunity
    Synonym: oportunidade

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from French chance or, in Mexico, from English chance. Doublet of cadencia.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈt͡ʃanθe/, [ˈt͡ʃãn̟.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈt͡ʃanse/, [ˈt͡ʃãn.se]

Noun

chance m or f (plural chances)

  1. chance

Conjunction

chance

  1. (Mexico) maybe, perchance, perhaps or possibly
    Synonyms: a lo mejor, quizá, quizás, tal vez

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