casual vs passing what difference

what is difference between casual and passing

English

Alternative forms

  • casuall (obsolete)
  • (shortening, informal) cazh

Etymology

From Middle French casuel, from Late Latin cāsuālis (happening by chance), from Latin cāsus (event) (English case), from cadere (to fall) (whence English cadence).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkaʒuəl/, /ˈkaʒjuəl/, /ˈkazjuəl/, /ˈkaʒəl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkæʒuəl/, /ˈkæʒwəl/, /ˈkæʒəl/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ˈkɛʒʉɘl/, /ˈkɛʒɘl/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /-uæl/
  • Hyphenation: ca‧su‧al, cas‧ual, casu‧al

Adjective

casual (comparative more casual, superlative most casual)

  1. Happening by chance.
    • casual breaks, in the general system
  2. Coming without regularity; occasional or incidental.
    • a constant habit, rather than a casual gesture
  3. Employed irregularly.
  4. Careless.
    • 2007, Nick Holland, The Girl on the Bus (page 117)
      I removed my jacket and threw it casually over the back of the settee.
  5. Happening or coming to pass without design.
    • 2012, Jeff Miller, Grown at Glen Garden: Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson, and the Little Texas Golf Course that Propelled Them to Stardom
      Hogan assumed the entire creek bed was to be played as a casual hazard, moved his ball out and assessed himself a one-stroke penalty.
  6. Informal, relaxed.
  7. Designed for informal or everyday use.

Synonyms

  • (happening by chance): accidental, fortuitous, incidental, occasional, random; see also Thesaurus:accidental
  • (happening or coming to pass without design): unexpected
  • (relaxed; everyday use): informal

Antonyms

  • (happening by chance): inevitable, necessary
  • (happening or coming to pass without design): expected, scheduled
  • (relaxed; everyday use): ceremonial, formal

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

casual (plural casuals)

  1. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) A worker who is only working for a company occasionally, not as its permanent employee.
  2. A soldier temporarily at a place of duty, usually en route to another place of duty.
  3. (Britain) A member of a group of football hooligans who wear expensive designer clothing to avoid police attention; see casual (subculture).
  4. One who receives relief for a night in a parish to which he does not belong; a vagrant.
  5. (video games, informal, derogatory) A player of casual games.
  6. (fandom slang) A person whose engagement with media is relaxed or superficial.
    • 1972, Lee C. Garrison, “The Needs of Motion Picture Audiences”, California Management Review, Volume 15, Issue 2, Winter 1972, page 149:
      Casuals outnumbered regulars in the art-house audience two to one.
    • 2010, Jennifer Gillan, Television and New Media: Must-Click TV, page 16:
      Most often, when a series is marketed toward casuals, the loyals feel that their interests and needs are not being met.
    • 2018, E. J. Nielsen, “The Gay Elephant Meta in the Room: Sherlock and the Johnlock Conspiracy”, in Queerbaiting and Fandom: Teasing Fans Through Homoerotic Possibilities (ed. Joseph Brennan), page 91:
      Treating a gay relationship as a puzzle that must be pursued by the clever viewers and hidden from “casuals” until a narrative reveal at the eleventh hour seems antithetical to the idea of normalized representation that TJLCers claim as the main reason they want Johnlock to be canon, []
  7. (Britain, dated) A tramp.

Translations

Related terms

  • casualty
  • case

References

  • casual in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Calusa, casula, causal

Catalan

Adjective

casual (masculine and feminine plural casuals)

  1. casual
  2. unplanned

Derived terms

  • casualitat
  • casualment

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ca‧su‧al
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Adjective

casual m or f (plural casuais, comparable)

  1. casual (happening by chance)
    Synonym: fortuito
  2. casual (coming without regularity)
    Synonym: ocasional
  3. casual (designed for informal or everyday use)

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -al

Adjective

casual (plural casuales)

  1. casual
  2. accidental
  3. coincidental, chance

Derived terms

  • casualmente

Descendants

  • Cebuano: kaswal

Further reading

  • “casual” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

From pass +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɑːsɪŋ/

Verb

passing

  1. present participle of pass

Descendants

  • Japanese: パッシング (passhingu)

Adjective

passing (comparative more passing, superlative most passing)

  1. That passes away; ephemeral. [from 14th c.]
    • 1814, Lord Byron, Lara, I.15:
      And solace sought he none from priest nor leech, / And soon the same in movement and in speech / As heretofore he fill’d the passing hours []
    • 2010, Marianne Kirby, The Guardian, 21 Sep 2010:
      It might be possible to dismiss #dittowatch as just another passing internet fancy. After all, hashtags are ephemeral.
  2. (now rare, literary) Pre-eminent, excellent, extreme. [from 14th c.]
    • 1835, Washington Irving, The Crayon Miscellany:
      It was by dint of passing strength, / That he moved the massy stone at length.
    • 1847, Robert Holmes, The Case of Ireland Stated:
      That parliament was destined, in one short hour of convulsive strength, in one short hour of passing glory, to humble the pride and alarm the fears of England.
  3. Vague, cursory. [from 18th c.]
    • 2011, Stewart J Lawrence, The Guardian, 14 Jun 2011:
      Ardent pro-lifer Rick Santorum made one passing reference to “authenticity” as a litmus test for a conservative candidate, but if he was obliquely referring to Romney (and he was), you could be excused for missing the dig.
  4. Going past.

Translations

Adverb

passing (not comparable)

  1. (literary or archaic) Surpassingly, greatly. [from 14th c.]
    • 2010 October 30, Simon Hattenstone, The Guardian:
      I find it passing strange that convicts understand honest folk, but honest folk don’t understand convicts.

Usage notes

  • This use is sometimes misconstrued as meaning “vaguely” or “slightly” (perhaps by confusion with such phrases as “passing fancy”, under Adjective, above), leading to formations such as “more than passing clever” etc.

Translations

Noun

passing (countable and uncountable, plural passings)

  1. Death, dying; the end of something. [from 14th c.]
  2. The fact of going past; a movement from one place to another or a change from one state to another. [from 14th c.]
    • 1913, Oliver Onions, The Story of Louie
      And since he did not see Louie by the folding door, Louie knew that in his former passings and repassings he could not have seen her either.
  3. (law) The act of approving a bill etc. [from 15th c.]
  4. (sports) The act of passing a ball etc. to another player. [from 19th c.]
  5. A form of juggling where several people pass props between each other, usually clubs or rings.
  6. (sociology) The ability of a person to be regarded as a member of an identity group or category different from their own.
    Coordinate term: pass
    • 1963, Erving Goffman, ‘Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity’ , Ch.2 at p.57, 58 (page numbers per the Pelican Books 1976 reprint)
      When there is a discrepancy between an individual’s actual social identity and his virtual one, it is possible for this fact to be known to us before we normals contact him, or to be quite evident when he presents himself before us. He is a discredited person, and it is mainly he I have been dealing with until now.
      […] However, when his differentness is not immediately apparent, and is not known beforehand, […] he is a discreditable, not a discredited person […]. The issue is […] that of managing information about his failing. To display or not to display; to tell or not to tell; to let on or not to let on; to lie or not to lie; and in each case, to whom, how, when, and where.
      […] It is this second general issue, the management of undisclosed discrediting information about self, that I am focusing on in these notes – in brief, ‘passing’.

Translations


French

Etymology

From English passing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɑ.siŋ/

Noun

passing m (uncountable)

  1. (juggling) passing
    Le passing, ou comment jongler à plusieurs. (www.multiloisirs.com)

Further reading

  • “passing” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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