Catalog vs Index what difference

what is difference between Catalog and Index

English

Noun

catalog (plural catalogs)

  1. US and Canada spelling of catalogue

Usage notes

In the US, both catalog and catalogue are used, with catalogue chiefly limited to some traditional contexts and catalog commonly used elsewhere.

Verb

catalog (third-person singular simple present catalogs, present participle cataloging, simple past and past participle cataloged)

  1. US spelling of catalogue

Further reading

  • “catalog”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary, (Please provide a date or year).

Anagrams

  • galacto-

Romanian

Etymology

From French catalogue, from Latin catalogus.

Noun

catalog n (plural cataloage)

  1. catalogue

Declension


Scottish Gaelic

Noun

catalog m (genitive cataloig, plural catalogan)

  1. catalogue


For Wiktionary’s indexes, see Wiktionary:Index

English

Etymology

From Latin index (a discoverer, informer, spy; of things, an indicator, the forefinger, a title, superscription), from indicō (point out, show); see indicate.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪndɛks/

Noun

index (plural indexes or indices or (obsolete, in use in the 17th century) index’s)

  1. An alphabetical listing of items and their location.
  2. The index finger; the forefinger.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:index finger
  3. A movable finger on a gauge, scale, etc.
  4. (typography) A symbol resembling a pointing hand, used to direct particular attention to a note or paragraph.
    Synonym: manicule
  5. That which points out; that which shows, indicates, manifests, or discloses.
    • 1730, John Arbuthnot, An Essay Concerning the Nature of Aliments
      Tastes are the Indexes of the different Qualities of Plants.
  6. A sign; an indication; a token.
    • 1887, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Misadventures of John Nicholson
      His son’s empty guffaws [] struck him with pain as the indices of a weak mind.
  7. (linguistics) A type of noun where the meaning of the form changes with respect to the context. E.g., ‘Today’s newspaper’ is an indexical form since its referent will differ depending on the context. See also icon and symbol.
  8. (economics) A single number calculated from an array of prices or of quantities.
  9. (sciences) A number representing a property or ratio, a coefficient.
  10. (mathematics) A raised suffix indicating a power.
  11. (computing, especially programming and databases) An integer or other key indicating the location of data e.g. within an array, vector, database table, associative array, or hash table.
  12. (computing, databases) A data structure that improves the performance of operations on a table.
  13. (obsolete) A prologue indicating what follows.
    • c. 1599-1602, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, III, 4
      Ay me, what act, that roars so loud and thunders in the index?

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • (alphabetical listing): table of contents

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989) , “index”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN

Verb

index (third-person singular simple present indexes, present participle indexing, simple past and past participle indexed)

  1. (transitive) To arrange an index for something, especially a long text.
  2. To inventory, to take stock.
  3. (chiefly economics) To normalise in order to account for inflation; to correct for inflation by linking to a price index in order to maintain real levels.
  4. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  5. (linguistics, transitive) To be indexical for (some situation or state of affairs); to indicate.
  6. (computing) To access a value in a data container by an index.

Derived terms

  • indexer

Translations

Further reading

  • index in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • index in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • nixed, xenid

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɪndɛks]

Noun

index m

  1. index (alphabetical listing of items and their location)
  2. (economics) index
    index spotřebitelských cen — consumer price index
  3. (computing, databases) index (a data structure that improves the performance of operations on a table)

Synonyms

  • (alphabetical listing): rejstřík

Related terms

  • See dikce
  • indexace
  • indexový
  • indexovat
  • indexování
  • indicie
  • indikace
  • indikátor
  • indikovat

Further reading

  • index in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • index in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch index, from Latin index.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪn.dɛks/
  • Hyphenation: in‧dex

Noun

index m (plural indexen or indices, diminutive indexje n)

  1. index (list)
  2. index (number or coefficient representing various relations)
  3. (medicine, anatomy) index finger
    Synonym: wijsvinger

Derived terms

  • brekingsindex
  • prijsindex

Related terms

  • indexatie
  • indexeren
  • indicator
  • indiceren

French

Etymology

From Latin index (pointer, indicator), from indicō (point out, show).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.dɛks/

Noun

index m (plural index)

  1. index
  2. forefinger
  3. The welcome page of a web site, typically index.html, index.htm or index.php

Derived terms

  • mettre à l’index

Further reading

  • “index” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin index.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈindɛks]
  • Hyphenation: in‧dex
  • Rhymes: -ɛks

Noun

index (plural indexek)

  1. (automotive) turn signal (US), indicator (UK) (each of the flashing lights on each side of a vehicle which indicate a turn is being made to left or right, or a lane change)
    Synonym: irányjelző
  2. pointer, hand, indicator (a needle or dial on a device)
    Synonyms: mutató, kar
  3. (higher education) transcript, report card, course report (in higher education)
    Synonym: leckekönyv
    Coordinate term: (in lower education) ellenőrző
  4. index (an alphabetical listing of items and their location, usually at the end of publications)
    Synonyms: névmutató, tárgymutató, szómutató
  5. ban, blacklist (a list of books that was banned)

Declension

Derived terms

References

Further reading

  • index in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Latin

Etymology

From indicō (point out, indicate, show), from in (in, at, on; into) + dicō (indicate; dedicate; set apart).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈin.deks/, [ˈɪn̪d̪ɛks̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈin.deks/, [ˈin̪d̪ɛks]

Noun

index m or f (genitive indicis); third declension

  1. A pointer, indicator.
  2. The index finger, forefinger.
    Synonym: digitus salūtāris
  3. (of books) An index, list, catalogue, table, summary, digest.
  4. (of books) A title, superscription.
  5. A sign, indication, proof, mark, token, index.
  6. An informer, discoverer, director, talebearer, guide, witness, betrayer, spy.
  7. (of paintings or statues) An inscription.

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • index in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • index in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • index in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • index in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • index in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • index in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • index in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin index

Noun

index n (plural indexuri)

  1. index

Declension


Swedish

Noun

index n

  1. an index

Declension

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