cater vs supply what difference

what is difference between cater and supply

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English catour (acater, provisioner), aphetic form of acatour (acater), from Old French acater (to buy, to purchase). Equivalent to cate +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkeɪtə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkeɪtɚ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪtə(ɹ)

Verb

cater (third-person singular simple present caters, present participle catering, simple past and past participle catered)

  1. To provide, particularly:
    • a. 1635, Thomas Randolph, Poems, p. 4:
      Noe widdowes curse caters a dish of mine.
    1. (transitive, intransitive) To provide with food, especially for a special occasion as a professional service.
      • a. 1616, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act II, Sc. iii, ll. 45 ff.:
        He that doth the Rauens feede,
        Yea prouidently caters for the Sparrow.
      I catered for her bat mitzvah.
      His company catered our wedding.
    2. (intransitive, figuratively, with ‘to’) To provide anything required or desired, often (derogatory) to pander.
      • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Paris Sketch Book, Vol. II, p. 16:
        Art… was… catering to the national taste and vanity.
      I always wanted someone to cater to my every whim.
Derived terms
  • caterer
Translations

Noun

cater (plural caters)

  1. (obsolete) Synonym of acater: an officer who purchased cates (food supplies) for the steward of a large household or estate.
    • c. 1400, “Gamelyn”, ll. 321 ff.:
      I am oure Catour and bere oure Alther purse.
    • 1512, Account Book of the Hospital of St. John, Canterbury (1510–1556):
      Rec. for iij calvys off þe cater of Crystis Cherche.
  2. (obsolete) Synonym of caterer: any provider of food.
    • c. 1430, John Lydgate translating Giovanni Boccaccio as The Fall of Princes, Bk. VII, Ch. x, l. 161:
      Of his diete catour was scarsite…
  3. (figuratively, obsolete) Synonym of purveyor: any provider of anything.
    • 1590, Robert Greene, Greenes Mourning Garment, p. 28:
      The eye is loues Cator.
Alternative forms
  • catour, cator, kater, chator (obsolete)

Etymology 2

Probably ultimately from French quatre (four), possibly via cater (change-ringing), although Liberman argues for a derivation from a North Germanic prefix meaning “crooked, angled, clumsy” from which he also derives cater-cousin and, via Norse, Old Irish cittach (left-handed, awkward). He finds this more likely than extension of the dice and change-ringing term cater as an adverb, given the likely cognates in other Germanic languages. Caterpillar and caterwaul are unrelated, being derived from cognates to cat, but may have influenced the pronunciation of Liberman’s proposed earlier *cate- or undergone similar sound changes.

Verb

cater (third-person singular simple present caters, present participle catering, simple past and past participle catered)

  1. (Britain dialect) To place, set, move, or cut diagonally or rhomboidally.
    • 1577, Barnaby Googe transl. Conrad Heresbach as Foure Bookes of Husbandry, Bk. II, fol. 69v:
      The trees are set checkerwise, and so catred [Latin: partim in quincuncem directis], as looke which way ye wyl, they lye leuel.
    • 1873, Silverland, p. 129:
      Cater’ across the rails ever so cleverly, you cannot escape jolt and jar.

Adverb

cater (not comparable)

  1. (Britain dialect, US) Diagonally.
    • 1881, Sebastian Evans, Leicestershire Words, Phrases, and Proverbs, s.v. “Cater and Cater-cornered”:
      Cater and Cater-cornered, diagonal; diagonally. To ‘cut cater’ in the case of velvet, cloth, etc., is… ‘cut on the cross’. Cater-snozzle, to make an angle; to ‘mitre’.
Derived terms
  • cater-corner, catercross, cater-snozzle, caterways, caterwise, cut cater

Etymology 3

From French quatre (four). Doublet of cuatro.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkeɪtə/, /ˈkatə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkeɪtəɹ/

Noun

cater (plural caters)

  1. (rare, obsolete) Four.
    • 1553, Thomas Wilson, The Arte of Rhetorique…, p. 86:
      The auditour… cometh in with sise sould, and cater denere, for vi.s. and iiii.d.
  2. (card games, dice games, obsolete) The four of cards or dice.
    • 1519, William Horman, Vulgaria, fol. 280v:
      Cater is a very good caste.
  3. (music) A method of ringing nine bells in four pairs with a ninth tenor bell.
    • 1872, Henry Thomas Ellacombe, The Bells of Church, p. 29:
      The very terms of the art are enough to frighten an amateur. Hunting, dodging… caters, cinques, etc.
    • 1878, George Grove, A Dictionary of Music and Musicians, s.v. “Cater”:
      Cater… The name given by change ringers to changes of nine bells. The word should probably be written quaters, as it is meant to denote the fact that four couples of bells change their places in the order of ringing.
Alternative forms
  • catre, quatre
Derived terms
  • cater-point, cater-trey
Related terms
  • ace, deuce, trey, cinque, sice
Translations

References

  • “† ‘cater, n¹.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1889.
  • “cater, n²., adv., v¹., and v².”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, 1889.
  • “cater”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  • cater in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • “Kitty-corner” in Anatoly Liberman’s Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008, →ISBN, pp. 133–135.

Anagrams

  • Carte, Trace, acter, caret, carte, crate, creat, react, recta, reäct, trace

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin quattuor.

Adjective

cater

  1. four

Noun

cater m (uncountable)

  1. four

Middle Dutch

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

cāter m

  1. tomcat

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: kater
  • Limburgish: kater

Further reading

  • “cater”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “cater (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English supplien, borrowed from Old French soupleer, souploier, from Latin supplere (to fill up, make full, complete, supply).
The Middle English spelling was modified to conform to Latin etymology.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: səplīʹ, IPA(key): /səˈplaɪ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪ
  • Hyphenation: sup‧ply

Verb

supply (third-person singular simple present supplies, present participle supplying, simple past and past participle supplied)

  1. (transitive) To provide (something), to make (something) available for use.
    to supply money for the war
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To furnish or equip with.
    to supply a furnace with fuel; to supply soldiers with ammunition
  3. (transitive) To fill up, or keep full.
    Rivers are supplied by smaller streams.
  4. (transitive) To compensate for, or make up a deficiency of.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      It was objected against him that he had never experienced love. Whereupon he arose, left the society, and made it a point not to return to it until he considered that he had supplied the defect.
  5. (transitive) To serve instead of; to take the place of.
    • 1666, Edmund Waller, Instructions to a Painter
      Burning ships the banished sun supply.
    • The sun was set, and Vesper, to supply / His absent beams, had lighted up the sky.
  6. (intransitive) To act as a substitute.
  7. (transitive) To fill temporarily; to serve as substitute for another in, as a vacant place or office; to occupy; to have possession of.
    to supply a pulpit
Derived terms
  • supplier
Related terms
  • suppletion
Translations

Noun

supply (countable and uncountable, plural supplies)

  1. (uncountable) The act of supplying.
    supply and demand
  2. (countable) An amount of something supplied.
    A supply of good drinking water is essential.
    She said, “China has always had a freshwater supply problem with 20 percent of the world’s population but only 7 percent of its freshwater.
  3. (in the plural) provisions.
  4. (chiefly in the plural) An amount of money provided, as by Parliament or Congress, to meet the annual national expenditures.
    to vote supplies
  5. Somebody, such as a teacher or clergyman, who temporarily fills the place of another; a substitute.
Derived terms
  • loss of supply
  • supply teacher
  • supply vessel
Translations

Etymology 2

supple +‎ -ly

Alternative forms

  • supplely

Pronunciation

  • enPR: sŭpʹlē, IPA(key): /ˈsʌpli/
  • Hyphenation: sup‧ply

Adverb

supply (comparative more supply, superlative most supply)

  1. Supplely: in a supple manner, with suppleness.
    • 1906, Ford Madox Ford, The fifth queen: and how she came to court, page 68:
      His voice was playful and full; his back was bent supply.
    • 1938, David Leslie Murray, Commander of the mists:
      [] the rain struck on her head as she bent supply to the movements of the pony, while it scrambled up the bank to the sheltering trees. For a couple of miles the path ran through woods alive with the varied voices of the rain, []
    • 1963, Johanna Moosdorf, Next door:
      She swayed slightly in the gusts, bent supply to them and seemed at one with the force which Straup found so hostile.
    • 1988, Михаи́л Алекса́ндрович Шо́лохов (Mikhail Aleksandrovich Sholokhov), Quiet flows the Don (translated), volume 1, page 96:
      Grigory hesitantly took her in his arms to kiss her, but she held him off, bent supply backwards and shot a frightened glance at the windows.
      ‘They’ll see!’
      ‘Let them!’
      ‘I’d be ashamed—’

Further reading

  • supply in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • supply in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • supply at OneLook Dictionary Search

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