cense vs incense what difference

what is difference between cense and incense

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛns/
  • Homophone: sense

Etymology 1

Backformation from incense

Verb

cense (third-person singular simple present censes, present participle censing, simple past and past participle censed)

  1. To perfume with incense.
    • The Salii sing and ‘cense his altars round.
    • 1989, Harry Willetts (translator), Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn (author), August 1914, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, →ISBN, page 205:
      Alternatively he would make a pretty good deacon: tall, well built, with quite a good voice, assiduously censing every nook and cranny, endowed with a certain histrionic talent, and perhaps also a genuine devotion to the service of God.
Translations

Etymology 2

Old French cense, French cens, Latin census.

Noun

cense (plural censes)

  1. (obsolete) A census.
  2. (obsolete) A public rate or tax.
    • 1657, James Howell, Londonopolis
      he took occasion thereby, to make a Cense of all the people
    • a. 1626, Francis Bacon, A Certificate to His Majesty [] Touching the Penal Laws
      as moneys a sum in name of a cense so returned
  3. (obsolete) condition; rank
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, Discoveries Made upon Men and Matter
      if you write to a man, whose estate and cense as senses, you are familiar with, you may the bolder (to let a taske to his braine) venter on a knot

References

cense in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • cenes, scene, sence

Latin

Verb

cēnsē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cēnseō

Spanish

Verb

cense

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of censar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of censar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of censar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English encens, from Old French encens (sweet-smelling substance) from Late Latin incensum (burnt incense, literally something burnt), neuter past participle of incendō (I set on fire). Compare incendiary. Cognate with Spanish encender and incienso.

Pronunciation

  • Noun:
    • enPR: ĭn’sĕns, IPA(key): /ˈɪnsɛns/
  • Verb:
    • enPR: ĭnsĕns’, IPA(key): /ɪnˈsɛns/

Noun

incense (countable and uncountable, plural incenses)

  1. A perfume used in the rites of various religions.
  2. (figuratively) Homage; adulation.

Hyponyms

  • joss stick, incense stick

Derived terms

  • incense boat
  • incense cedar

Related terms

  • frankincense

Translations

Verb

incense (third-person singular simple present incenses, present participle incensing, simple past and past participle incensed)

  1. (transitive) To anger or infuriate.
    I think it would incense him to learn the truth.
  2. (archaic) To incite, stimulate.
  3. (transitive) To offer incense to.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To perfume with, or as with, incense.
    • 1603, John Marston, The Malcontent
      Incensed with wanton sweetes.
    • 1837 Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      Neither, for the future, shall any man or woman, self-styled noble, be incensed, — foolishly fumigated with incense, in Church; as the wont has been.
  5. (obsolete) To set on fire; to inflame; to kindle; to burn.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Nicenes

Latin

Participle

incēnse

  1. vocative masculine singular of incēnsus

References

  • incense in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • incense in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • incense in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • incense in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • incense in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

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