century vs hundred what difference

what is difference between century and hundred

English

Etymology

From Middle English centurie (a count of one hundred (of anything); a division of the Roman army; century; a division of land), from Old French centurie, from Latin centuria, from centum (one hundred). The most common modern use is a shortening of century of years.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛn.t͡ʃə.ɹiː/, /ˈsɛn.t͡ʃɹiː/, /ˈsɛn.t͡ʃʊɹiː/
  • Hyphenation: cen‧tu‧ry, cent‧ury
  • Homophone: sentry (for some speakers)

Noun

century (plural centuries)

  1. A period of 100 consecutive years; often specifically a numbered period with conventional start and end dates, e.g., the twentieth century, which stretches from (strictly) 1901 through 2000, or (informally) 1900 through 1999. The first century AD was from 1 to 100.
    Synonym: yearhundred (very rare)
  2. A unit in ancient Roman army, originally of 100 army soldiers as part of a cohort, later of more varied sizes (but typically containing 60 to 70 or 80) soldiers or other men (guards, police, firemen), commanded by a centurion.
    Synonym: centuria
    Holonyms: maniple, cohort, legion
  3. A political division of ancient Rome, meeting in the Centuriate Assembly.
  4. A hundred things of the same kind; a hundred.
  5. (cricket) A hundred runs scored either by a single player in one innings, or by two players in a partnership.
  6. (snooker) A score of one hundred points.
  7. (sports) A race a hundred units (as meters, kilometres, miles) in length.
  8. (US, informal) A banknote in the denomination of one hundred dollars.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • centurion

Translations

See also

  • centennial, semicentennial, multicentennial, bicentennial, sesquicentennial, tricentennial, quadricentennial, quincentennial, sexcentennial, septicentennial, octocentennial, novocentennial
  • secular, plurisecular, multisecular
  • centenary, bicentenary, tricentenary, quadricentenary, quincentenary, sexcentenary, septicentenary, octocentenary, novocentenary
  • centenarian, multicentenarian

Anagrams

  • cuntery, curteyn


Translingual

Etymology

From English hundred

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhan.dred]

Numeral

hundred

  1. Code word for the digits 00 (whole hundreds) in the NATO/ICAO spelling alphabet
    one zero thousand nine hundred meter (10,900 m)

Usage notes

The code word hundred is used only for whole hundreds, and then only for distances (including altitudes). Thus 10,946 m is one zero thousand nine four six meter and 200° is two zero zero degree.

References


English

Alternative forms

  • Arabic numerals: 100 (see for numerical forms in other scripts)
  • Roman numerals: C
  • ISO prefix: hecto-
  • Exponential notation: 102

Etymology

From Middle English hundred, from Old English hundred, from Proto-Germanic *hundaradą, from *hundą (from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm) + *radą (count). Compare West Frisian hûndert, Dutch honderd, Low German hunnert, hunnerd, German Hundert, Danish hundred.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hŭnʹdrəd, hŭnʹdrĭd, IPA(key): /ˈhʌndɹəd/, /ˈhʌndɹɪd/
  • (mostly nonstandard) IPA(key): /ˈhʌndɚd/, /ˈhʌnd͡ʒɚd/
  • Hyphenation: hun‧dred

Numeral

hundred (plural hundreds)

  1. A numerical value equal to 100 (102), occurring after ninety-nine.
    hundreds of places, hundreds of thousands of faces
    a hundred, one hundred
    nineteen hundred, one thousand nine hundred
    • 2006 November 3, Susan Allport (guest), “Getting the skinny on fat”, Talk of the Nation: Science Friday, National Public Radio:
      That has really soared over the past a hundred years or so.
    • 2008 January 21, John Eggerton (interviewee), “The FCC’s New Rules for Media Ownership”, Justice Talking, National Public Radio:
      [I]t applies to only the top twenty markets in removing the ban, whereas in two thousand three the FCC was essentially proposing removing it let’s say in the top a hundred and seventy markets.
    • 2009 October 13, Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, “In Israel, Kibbutz Life Undergoes Reinvention”, All Things Considered, National Public Radio:
      Hanaton [] was founded in the nineteen eighties, but from the original a hundred and fourteen members, by two thousand and six, only eleven were left.
    • 2009 October 21, John Ydstie, “U.S. To Order Bailout Firms To Cut Exec Pay”, All Things Considered, National Public Radio:
      Overall, the top a hundred and seventy-five executives at the companies []
    • 2011, Kory Stamper, “What ‘Ironic’ Really Means” [2], “Ask the Editor”, Merriam-Webster:
      Ironic has been used vaguely at best for a good a hundred and fifty years.
  2. (24-hour clock) The pronunciation of “00” for the two digits denoting the minutes.
    • 2002, Michael Prescott, Next Victim, Signet, page 185:
      “Okay. You head over to City Hall East. I’ll meet you there. The briefing starts at eleven hundred, sharp.”

Usage notes

Unlike cardinal numerals up to ninety-nine, the word hundred is a noun like dozen and needs a determiner to function as a numeral.

  • a hundred men / one hundred men / the hundred men
  • compare a dozen men / one dozen men / the dozen men
  • compare ten men / the ten men

Hundred can be used also in plurals. It doesn’t take -s when preceded by a determiner.

  • two hundred men / some hundred men
  • hundreds of men

In telling military time, “hundred” is typically only used for exact hours, e.g. 09:00 is “oh nine hundred” and 21:00 is “twenty-one hundred”, while 03:30 is “oh three thirty”. Sometimes, nonstandardly (e.g. in fiction by authors not entirely familiar with military time-telling), 03:30 may be read as “oh three hundred thirty”.

Synonyms

  • (numerical): cent (obsolete, except in per cent), one hundred

Derived terms

  • hundredfold, hundredweight, hundredth, hundreds and thousands, hundredaire, yearhundred

Descendants

  • Hawaiian: haneli, hanele, haneri

Translations

Noun

hundred (plural hundreds)

  1. A hundred-dollar bill, or any other note denominated 100 (e.g. a hundred euros).
  2. (historical) An administrative subdivision of southern English counties formerly reckoned as comprising 100 hides (households or families) and notionally equal to 12,000 acres.
  3. (by extension, historical) Similar divisions in other areas, particularly in other areas of Britain or the British Empire
  4. (cricket) A score of one hundred runs or more scored by a batsman.

Hypernyms

  • (administrative division): See county and tithing

Synonyms

  • (US hundred-dollar bill): Franklin, yard, c-note
  • (administrative division): barony (Ireland), see also riding, wapentake, rape, commote (Wales)
  • (cricket: hundred runs): century

Hyponyms

  • (administrative division): See carucate (1100 hundred & for smaller divisions)

Derived terms

  • hundredal
  • Hundred End

Translations

See also

  • wapentake

Anagrams

  • hunderd

Danish

Alternative forms

  • (cardinal) hundrede
  • (noun) hundrede

Etymology

From Old Norse hundrað (hundred), from Proto-Germanic *hundaradą, from *hundą (< Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm) + *radą (count).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hunrəd/, [ˈhunɐð]

Numeral

hundred

  1. hundred

Descendants

  • Greenlandic: hundredi

Noun

hundred n (plural indefinite hundreder or hundred, plural definite hundrederne)

  1. a unit of about one hundred

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hundred, from Proto-Germanic *hundaradą (hundred); some forms are remodelled on hundrað.

Alternative forms

  • honderd, hondred, houndred, houndreth, hundered, hundereth, hunderyth, hundreþ, hundret, hundreth, hundrid, hundrit, hundrythe, hundurd, hwndreth

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhundrɛd/, /ˈhundrɛθ/, /ˈhundər/

Numeral

hundred

  1. A hundred; 100.
  2. A large number; a zillion.
Usage notes

Much like modern English hundred, hundred needs a determiner preceding it to function as a number.

Derived terms
  • hundredfold
Descendants
  • English: hundred
    • Hawaiian: haneli
  • Scots: hunder, hunner
  • Yola: hindreth, hundreth, hunderth
References
  • “hundred, card. num.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Noun

hundred (plural hundredes)

  1. A hundredweight.
  2. A hundred (administrative division)
  3. The assembly or court of such a division.
Derived terms
  • hundredpeny
Descendants
  • English: hundred
References
  • “hundred, card. num.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • “hundred, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

A combination of specialised use of the cardinal and hundred (hundred) +‎ -th.

Alternative forms

  • hondraȝte, hondred, hondredaȝte, hundredeþe, hundret, hundreþ, hundreth, hundrid

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhundrɛd/, /ˈhundrɛθ/, /ˈhundər/

Adjective

hundred

  1. A hundredth.
Descendants
  • English: hundredth
References
  • “hundredethe, ord. num.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hundaradą (hundred), from *hundą + *radą (count). Cognate with Old Frisian hundred, Old Saxon hunderod, Old Dutch *hundert, Old High German hundert, Old Norse hundrað.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈxun.dred/, [ˈhun.dred]

Numeral

hundred n

  1. hundred

Synonyms

  • hund
  • hundtēontiġ

Descendants

  • Middle English: hundred
    • English: hundred
      • Hawaiian: haneli
    • Scots: hunder, hunner
    • Yola: hindreth, hundreth, hunderth

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