certify vs indorse what difference

what is difference between certify and indorse

English

Etymology

From Old French certefier (confirm, assure, make certain). Compare French certifier.

Verb

certify (third-person singular simple present certifies, present participle certifying, simple past and past participle certified)

  1. (transitive) To attest to (a fact) as the truth.
  2. (transitive, law) To authenticate or verify in writing.
  3. (transitive) To attest that a product, service, organization, or person has met an official standard.
    These blankets have been certified as fireproof.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To inform; to tell (a person) that something is true.
    • 1847, The Church of England Magazine (volume 23, page 239)
      Our deeds do us three manners of service. First, they certify us that we are heirs of everlasting life, and that the Spirit of God, which is the earnest thereof, is in us.
  5. (archaic, reflexive) To assure (oneself) of something; to ascertain.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. III, ch. 80:
      After having certified himself of her own good health, he very kindly inquired about her mother and Miss Sophy [] .

Synonyms

  • (to attest as to): attest, witness, vouch for, approve, confirm

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

  • certify at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • certify in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • cretify, rectify


English

Etymology

Alteration influenced by Medieval Latin indorsare of Middle English endosse, from Old French endosser (to put on back), from Latin dossum, alternative form of dorsum (back), from which also dorsal (of the back). That is, the ‘r’ was dropped in Latin dossum, which developed into Old French and then Middle English endosse, and then the ‘r’ was re-introduced into English via the Medieval Latin indorsare, which had retained the ‘r’; at the same time the ‘e’ (French) was changed to ‘i’ (Latin) (in-, rather than en-). Note that the alternative form endorse is now more common, retaining the restored ‘r’ but reverting to the initial ‘e’, rather than the Latinate ‘i’.

Verb

indorse (third-person singular simple present indorses, present participle indorsing, simple past and past participle indorsed)

  1. (Britain, India, rare) Alternative form of endorse

Derived terms

  • indorsement

References

Anagrams

  • ordines, ride-ons, rosined, siredon, sordine

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