certify vs license what difference

what is difference between certify and license

English

Etymology

From Old French certefier (confirm, assure, make certain). Compare French certifier.

Verb

certify (third-person singular simple present certifies, present participle certifying, simple past and past participle certified)

  1. (transitive) To attest to (a fact) as the truth.
  2. (transitive, law) To authenticate or verify in writing.
  3. (transitive) To attest that a product, service, organization, or person has met an official standard.
    These blankets have been certified as fireproof.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To inform; to tell (a person) that something is true.
    • 1847, The Church of England Magazine (volume 23, page 239)
      Our deeds do us three manners of service. First, they certify us that we are heirs of everlasting life, and that the Spirit of God, which is the earnest thereof, is in us.
  5. (archaic, reflexive) To assure (oneself) of something; to ascertain.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. III, ch. 80:
      After having certified himself of her own good health, he very kindly inquired about her mother and Miss Sophy [] .

Synonyms

  • (to attest as to): attest, witness, vouch for, approve, confirm

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

  • certify at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • certify in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • cretify, rectify


English

Alternative forms

  • (British, Canadian, Australian, Irish, South African and New Zealand English) licence (noun)

Etymology

From Middle English licence, licens, lisence, lissens, licance (noun) and licencen, licensen, lisensen, licent (verb), from Old French licence, from Latin licentia (license), from licens, present participle of licere (to be allowed, be allowable); compare linquere, Ancient Greek λείπω (leípō, leave).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlaɪsəns/
  • Hyphenation: li‧cense

Noun

license (countable and uncountable, plural licenses)

  1. A legal document giving official permission to do something; a permit.
  2. The legal terms under which a person is allowed to use a product, especially software.
  3. Freedom to deviate deliberately from normally applicable rules or practices (especially in behaviour or speech).
  4. Excessive freedom; lack of due restraint.
  5. Short for driver’s license.

Usage notes

  • In British English, Canadian English, Australian English, Irish English, South African English and New Zealand English the noun is spelt licence and the verb is license.
  • The spelling licence is not used for either part of speech in the United States.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • licensure
  • licentious

Translations

Verb

license (third-person singular simple present licenses, present participle licensing, simple past and past participle licensed)

  1. Authorize officially.
  2. (transitive) (applied to a piece of intellectual property)
    1. To give formal authorization to use.
    2. To acquire authorization to use, usually in exchange for compensation.
  3. (linguistics, transitive) To permit (as grammatically correct).

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • license in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • license in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Licence in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • selenic, silence

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