certify vs show what difference

what is difference between certify and show

English

Etymology

From Old French certefier (confirm, assure, make certain). Compare French certifier.

Verb

certify (third-person singular simple present certifies, present participle certifying, simple past and past participle certified)

  1. (transitive) To attest to (a fact) as the truth.
  2. (transitive, law) To authenticate or verify in writing.
  3. (transitive) To attest that a product, service, organization, or person has met an official standard.
    These blankets have been certified as fireproof.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To inform; to tell (a person) that something is true.
    • 1847, The Church of England Magazine (volume 23, page 239)
      Our deeds do us three manners of service. First, they certify us that we are heirs of everlasting life, and that the Spirit of God, which is the earnest thereof, is in us.
  5. (archaic, reflexive) To assure (oneself) of something; to ascertain.
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, vol. III, ch. 80:
      After having certified himself of her own good health, he very kindly inquired about her mother and Miss Sophy [] .

Synonyms

  • (to attest as to): attest, witness, vouch for, approve, confirm

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

  • certify at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • certify in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • cretify, rectify


English

Alternative forms

  • shew (archaic)
  • shewe (obsolete)
  • showe (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English schewen, schawen, scheawen, from Old English scēawian (to look, look at, exhibit, display), from Proto-Germanic *skawwōną (to look, see), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewh₁- (to heed, look, feel, take note of); see haw, gaum, caveat, caution.

Cognate with Scots shaw (to show), Saterland Frisian scoe (to look, behold), Dutch schouwen (to inspect, view), German schauen (to see, behold), Danish skue (to behold), Icelandic skygna (to spy, behold, see). Related to sheen.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation): IPA(key): /ʃəʊ/
  • (General American): enPR: shō, IPA(key): /ʃoʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Verb

show (third-person singular simple present shows, present participle showing, simple past showed or (archaic) shew, past participle shown or (now rare, US) showed)

  1. (transitive) To display, to have somebody see (something).
  2. (transitive) To bestow; to confer.
    to show mercy; to show favour; (dialectal) show me the salt please
  3. (transitive) To indicate (a fact) to be true; to demonstrate.
    • 2018, VOA Learning English > China’s Melting Glacier Brings Visitors, Adds to Climate Concerns
      A report this year in the Journal of Geophysical Research showed that the glacier has lost 60 percent of its mass.
  4. (transitive) To guide or escort.
  5. (intransitive) To be visible; to be seen; to appear.
    • Just such she shows before a rising storm.
  6. (intransitive, informal) To put in an appearance; show up.
  7. (intransitive, informal) To have an enlarged belly and thus be recognizable as pregnant.
  8. (intransitive, racing) To finish third, especially of horses or dogs.
  9. (intransitive, card games) To reveal one’s hand of cards.
    • 2017, Nathan Schwiethale, Ace High: Mastering Low Stakes Poker Cash Games (page 70)
      He called instantly but was too ashamed to show until the river.
  10. (obsolete) To have a certain appearance, such as well or ill, fit or unfit; to become or suit; to appear.

Usage notes

  • The past participle shown was uncommon before the 19th century, but is now the preferred form in standard English. In the UK, showed is regarded as archaic or dialectal. In the US, it is considered a standard variant form, but shown is more common. Garner’s Modern American Usage favors shown over showed as past participle and claims it is mandatory for passives.
  • In the past, shew was used as a past-tense form and shewed as a past participle of this verb; both forms are now archaic.

Synonyms

  • (display): display, indicate, point out, reveal, exhibit
  • (indicate a fact to be true): demonstrate, prove
  • (put in an appearance): arrive, show up

Antonyms

  • (display): conceal, cover up, hide
  • (indicate a fact to be true): disprove, refute

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • showcase
  • showdown

Noun

show (countable and uncountable, plural shows)

  1. (countable) A play, dance, or other entertainment.
  2. (countable) An exhibition of items.
  3. (countable) A broadcast program/programme.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Every day I do my morning show.

  4. (countable) A movie.
  5. (Australia, New Zealand, countable) An agricultural show.
  6. A project or presentation.
    Let’s get on with the show.   Let’s get this show on the road.   They went on an international road show to sell the shares to investors.   It was Apple’s usual dog and pony show.
  7. (countable) A demonstration.
  8. (uncountable) Mere display or pomp with no substance. (Usually seen in the phrases “all show” and “for show”.)
    • 1728, Edward Young, The Love of Fame
      I envy none their pageantry and show.
  9. Outward appearance; wileful or deceptive appearance.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III Scene 2
      So may the outward shows be least themselves:
      The world is still deceived with ornament.
  10. (baseball, with “the”) The major leagues.
  11. (mining, obsolete) A pale blue flame at the top of a candle flame, indicating the presence of firedamp.
  12. (archaic) Pretence.
  13. (archaic) Sign, token, or indication.
  14. (obsolete) Semblance; likeness; appearance.
    • Beware of the scribes, [] which devour widows’ houses, and for a shew make long prayers.
  15. (obsolete) Plausibility.
  16. (medicine) A discharge, from the vagina, of mucus streaked with blood, occurring a short time before labor.

Synonyms

  • (exhibition): exhibition, exposition
  • (demonstration): demonstration, illustration, proof
  • (broadcast program(me)): program(me)
  • (mere display with no substance): façade, front, superficiality
  • (baseball): big leagues

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

See also

  • showman
  • showpiece
  • show-stopper
  • show-stopping

References

Anagrams

  • Hows, how’s, hows, who’s, whos

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English show.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃoː/
  • Hyphenation: show

Noun

show m (plural shows, diminutive showtje n)

  1. A show (entertainment).

Derived terms

  • modeshow
  • showbiz
  • showen
  • talkshow

Finnish

Etymology

From English show.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃou̯/, [ˈʃo̞u̯]
  • IPA(key): /ˈʃoː/, [ˈʃo̞ː]
  • IPA(key): /ˈsoː/, [ˈs̠o̞ː]

Noun

show

  1. show (entertainment)

Usage notes

In plural usually substituted with a synonym, as the word does not easily fit into any Finnish declension category.

Declension

Compounds

  • jääshow
  • lavashow
  • muotishow
  • ravintolashow
  • televisioshow
  • valoshow

Synonyms

  • esitys, näytös

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃo/

Noun

show m (plural shows)

  1. (Anglicism) show

Hungarian

Etymology

From English show.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃoː]
  • Homophone:
  • Hyphenation: show
  • Rhymes: -ʃoː

Noun

show (plural show-k)

  1. show (entertainment, programme, production, performance)

Declension

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from English show.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃɔʋ/, /ʃɔʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʋ, -ɔʊ

Noun

show n (definite singular showet, indefinite plural show, definite plural showa or showene)

  1. a show (play, concert, entertainment)

Derived terms

  • moteshow
  • sceneshow

References

  • “show” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from English show.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʂɔʋ/, /ʂɔu/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʋ, -ɔu

Noun

show n (definite singular showet, indefinite plural show, definite plural showa)

  1. a show (play, concert, entertainment)

Derived terms

  • moteshow
  • sceneshow

References

  • “show” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From English show, from Middle English schewen, schawen, scheawen, from Old English scēawian, from Proto-Germanic *skawwōną, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewh₁-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //ʂɔw//

Noun

show m inan (indeclinable)

  1. show (exhibition)

Further reading

  • show in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • show in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • chou (rare), xou (rare)

Etymology

Borrowed from English show.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈʃow/

Noun

show m (plural shows)

  1. show (a entertainment performance event)
    Synonyms: espetáculo, apresentação
    1. (especially) concert (musical presentation)
  2. (slang) an act or performance that demonstrates high skill; spectacle; display; feat
  3. (slang, often used in dar um show) the action of crying or yelling out loud in order to protest or complain about something, often in the context of a discussion or argument

Derived terms

  • dar um show
  • show de bola

Adjective

show (invariable, comparable)

  1. (Brazil, slang) amazing; awesome
    Synonyms: espetacular, excelente, maravilhoso

Spanish

Etymology

From English show.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃou/, [ˈʃou̯]
  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃou/, [ˈt͡ʃou̯]
  • IPA(key): /ˈsou/, [ˈsou̯]

Noun

show m (plural shows)

  1. show
  2. (informal) a scandal
  3. spectacle
  4. an exhibition motivated action or thing

Swedish

Etymology

From English show.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɧɔ͡ʊ/, [ɧɔ͡ʊ], [ʂɔ͡ʊ]
  • IPA(key): /ɧɔv/, [ɧɔvː], [ʂɔvː]
  • IPA(key): /ɧoː/ (dated)

Noun

show c

  1. show; a play, dance, or other entertainment.

Declension

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