cherish vs like what difference

what is difference between cherish and like

English

Etymology

From Middle English charish, cherishen (to have affection for, hold dear, treat kindly; to esteem, respect; to cherish; to take care of; to greet; to entertain, treat hospitably; to cheer; to encourage, incite), from Old French cherir, chierir (to cherish) (modern French chérir (to cherish)), from cher, chier (dear, dearest) (from Latin cārus (beloved, dear), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂- (to desire, wish)) + -ir (suffix forming infinitives of second conjugation verbs).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈtʃɛɹɪʃ/
  • Hyphenation: cher‧ish

Verb

cherish (third-person singular simple present cherishes, present participle cherishing, simple past and past participle cherished)

  1. To treat with affection, care, and tenderness; to nurture or protect with care.
  2. To have a deep appreciation of; to hold dear.
    Antonym: despise
  3. (obsolete) To cheer, to gladden.

Conjugation

Derived terms

Related terms

  • caress

Translations

References

Further reading

  • cherish (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Alternative forms

  • lak

Pronunciation

  • enPR: līk, IPA(key): /laɪ̯k/
  • (MLE, Jamaica) IPA(key): /læ̙ːk/, /lɑːk/
  • (Dublin English) IPA(key): /lɔɪ̯k/
  • Rhymes: -aɪk

Etymology 1

Verb from Middle English liken, from Old English līcian (to please; be sufficient), from Proto-West Germanic *līkēn, from Proto-Germanic *līkāną (to please), from Proto-Indo-European *leyg- (image; likeness; similarity).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian liekje (to be similar, resemble), Dutch lijken (to seem), German Low German lieken (to be like; resemble), German gleichen (to resemble), Swedish lika (to like; put up with; align with), Norwegian like (to like), Icelandic líka (to like).

Noun from Middle English like (pleasure, will, like), from the verb Middle English liken (to like).

Verb

like (third-person singular simple present likes, present participle liking, simple past and past participle liked)

  1. To enjoy, be pleased by; favor; be in favor of.
    Antonyms: dislike, hate, mislike
  2. (transitive, archaic) To please.
  3. (obsolete) To derive pleasure of, by or with someone or something.
  4. To prefer and maintain (an action) as a regular habit or activity.
  5. (obsolete) To have an appearance or expression; to look; to seem to be (in a specified condition).
  6. (archaic) To come near; to avoid with difficulty; to escape narrowly.
  7. To find attractive; to prefer the company of; to have mild romantic feelings for.
    Synonyms: (British) fancy, enjoy, love
    Antonyms: dislike, hate, mislike
  8. (obsolete) To liken; to compare.
  9. (Internet, transitive) To show support for, or approval of, something posted on the Internet by marking it with a vote.
    Antonyms: unlike, dislike
  10. (with ‘would’ and in certain other phrases) To want, desire. See also would like.
  11. (computing, chiefly in the negative) To accept as an input.
Usage notes
  • In its senses of “enjoy” and “maintain as a regular habit”, like is a catenative verb; in the former, it usually takes a gerund (-ing form), while in the latter, it takes a to-infinitive. See also Appendix:English catenative verbs.
  • Like is only used to mean “want” in certain expressions, such as “if you like” and “I would like”. The conditional form, would like, is used quite freely as a polite synonym for want.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Jersey Dutch: lāike
Related terms
  • like like
  • would like
Translations

Noun

like (plural likes)

  1. (usually in the plural) Something that a person likes (prefers).
    Synonyms: favorite, preference
    Antonyms: dislike, pet hate, pet peeve
  2. (Internet) An individual vote showing support for, or approval of, something posted on the Internet.
Translations

References

  • like on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Adjective from Middle English like, lyke, from Old English ġelīċ by shortening, influenced by Old Norse líkr, glíkr; both from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz (like, similar, same). Related to alike; more distantly, with lich and -ly. Cognate with West Frisian like (like; as), Saterland Frisian gliek (like), Danish lig (alike), Dutch gelijk (like, alike), German gleich (equal, like), Icelandic líkur (alike, like, similar), Norwegian lik (like, alike) Swedish lik (like, similar)

Adverb from Middle English like, lyke, liche, lyche, from Old English ġelīċe (likewise, also, as, in like manner, similarly) and Old Norse líka (also, likewise); both from Proto-Germanic *galīkê, from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz (same, like, similar).

Conjunction from Middle English like, lyke, lik, lyk, from the adverb Middle English like.

Preposition from Middle English like, lyke, liche, lyche, lijc, liih (similar to, like, equal to, comparable with), from Middle English like (adjective) and like (adverb).

Adjective

like (comparative more like, superlative most like)

  1. Similar.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      It will seem strange that in all this time the Presbytery was idle, and no effort was made to rid the place of so fell an influence. But there was a reason, and the reason, as in most like cases, was a lassie.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. 3, Landlord Edmund
      [] and this is not a sky, it is a Soul and living Face! Nothing liker the Temple of the Highest, bright with some real effulgence of the Highest, is seen in this world.
  2. (obsolete) Likely; probable.
    • 1668, Robert South, The Messiah’s Sufferings for the Sins of the People (sermon, March 20, 1668)
      But it is like the jolly world about us will scoff at the paradox of these practices.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      She had waited overlong, and now it was like that Ailie would escape her toils.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • as like as not
Translations

Adverb

like (comparative more like, superlative most like)

  1. (obsolete, colloquial) Likely.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2 Scene 3
      DON PEDRO. May be she doth but counterfeit.
      CLAUDIO. Faith, like enough. [= Indeed, quite likely.]
  2. (archaic or rare) In a like or similar manner.
    • Like as a father pitieth his children, so the Lord pitieth them that fear him.

Noun

like (countable and uncountable, plural likes)

  1. (sometimes as the likes of) Someone similar to a given person, or something similar to a given object; a comparative; a type; a sort.
    • 1935, Winston Churchill on T.E. Lawrence
      We shall never see his like again.
  2. (golf) The stroke that equalizes the number of strokes played by the opposing player or side.
Synonyms
  • ilk
Antonyms
  • antithesis, opposite
Derived terms
  • like-for-like
Translations

Conjunction

like

  1. (colloquial) As, the way.
    • 1966, Advertising slogan for Winston cigarettes
      Winston tastes good like a cigarette should
    • 1978, “Do Unto Others” by Bob Dylan
      But if you do right to me, baby
      I’ll do right to you, too
      Ya got to do unto others
      Like you’d have them, like you’d have them, do unto you
  2. As if; as though.
Usage notes
  • The American Heritage Dictionary opines that using like as a conjunction, instead of as, the way, as if, or as though, is informal; it has, however, been routine since the Middle English period. AHD4 says “Writers since Chaucer’s time have used like as a conjunction, but 19th-century and 20th-century critics have been so vehement in their condemnations of this usage that a writer who uses the construction in formal style risks being accused of illiteracy or worse”, and recommends using as in formal speech and writing. OED does not tag it as colloquial or nonstandard, but notes, “Used as conj[unction]: = ‘like as’, as. Now generally condemned as vulgar or slovenly, though examples may be found in many recent writers of standing.”
Derived terms
  • feel like
  • like it’s going out of style
  • look like
  • seem like
  • sound like

Preposition

like

  1. Similar to, reminiscent of.
  2. Typical of
    It would be just like Achilles to be sulking in his tent.
  3. Approximating
    Popcorn costs something like $10 dollars at the movies.
  4. In the manner of, similarly to.
    He doesn’t act like a president.
  5. Such as
    It’s for websites like Wikipedia.
  6. As if there would be.
    It looks like a hot summer in Europe.
Synonyms
  • (such as): for example, such as, (archaic) as
Antonyms
  • unlike
Derived terms
  • like a bull at a gate
Translations

Particle

like

  1. (colloquial, Scotland, Ireland, Tyneside, Teesside, Liverpudlian) A delayed filler.
  2. (colloquial) A mild intensifier.
    • 1972, Charles M. Schulz, Peanuts, December 1:
      [Sally Brown:] Christmas is getting all you can get while the getting is good.
      [Charlie Brown:] GIVING! The only real joy is GIVING!
      [Sally Brown, rolling her eyes:] Like, wow!
  3. (colloquial) indicating approximation or uncertainty
  4. (colloquial, slang) When preceded by any form of the verb to be, used to mean “to say” or “to think”; used to precede an approximate quotation or paraphrase.
    • 2006, Lily Allen, Knock ‘Em Out
      You’re just doing your own thing and some one comes out the blue,
      They’re like, “Alright”
      What ya saying, “Yeah can I take your digits?”
      And you’re like, “no not in a million years, you’re nasty please leave me alone.”
Synonyms
  • (delayed filler): I mean, you know
  • (mild intensifier): I mean, well, you know
  • (indicating approximation or uncertainty): I mean, well, you know
  • (colloquial: used to precede paraphrased quotations): be all, go
Usage notes

The use as a quotative (see be like) is informal. It is commonly used by young people, and commonly disliked by older generations, especially in repeated use. It may be combined with the use of the present tense as a narrative. Similar terms are to go and all, as in I go, “Why did you do that?” and he goes, “I don’t know” and I was all, “Why did you do that?” and he was all, “I don’t know.” These expressions can imply that the attributed remark which follows is representative rather than necessarily an exact quotation; however, in speech these structures do tend to require mimicking the original speaker’s inflection in a way said would not.

Excessive use of “like” as a meaningless filler is widely criticised.

Translations

Interjection

like

  1. (Liverpudlian, Tyneside) Used to place emphasis upon a statement.

Etymology 3

From like (adverb) and like (adjective).

Verb

like (third-person singular simple present likes, present participle liking, simple past and past participle liked)

  1. (chiefly dialectal, intransitive) To be likely.
References
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN
  • like at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Kiel, Kile, kile, liek

Further reading

  • “I’m (like) ” from Language Log

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English like.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [lɑjɡ̊]

Noun

like n (singular definite liket, plural indefinite likes)

  1. (Internet) like

Verb

like (imperative like, infinitive at like, present tense liker, past tense likede, perfect tense har liket)

  1. (Internet) like

French

Pronunciation

  • Homophones: likent, likes

Verb

like

  1. first-person singular present indicative of liker
  2. third-person singular present indicative of liker
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of liker
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of liker
  5. second-person singular imperative of liker

German

Verb

like

  1. inflection of liken:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Hawaiian

Etymology

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *lite. Compare Maori rite.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈli.ke/, [ˈlike]

Verb

like

  1. (stative) like, alike, similar

Derived terms

  • hoʻolike: to make things equal, to make things similar (less common)
  • hoʻohālike: to make things equal, to make things similar (more common)

References

  • “like” in the Hawaiian Dictionary, Revised and Enlarged Edition, University of Hawaii Press, 1986

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse líka

Verb

like (imperative lik, present tense liker, simple past likte, past participle likt)

  1. to like

Etymology 2

Adjective

like

  1. definite singular of lik
  2. plural of lik

Etymology 3

Adverb

like

  1. as, equally
Derived terms
  • likefullt, like fullt
  • likeledes
  • likeså

References

  • “like” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːkə/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse líka

Alternative forms

  • lika

Verb

like (imperative lik or like, present tense likar or liker, simple past lika or likte, past participle lika or likt)

  1. to like

Etymology 2

Adjective

like

  1. definite singular of lik
  2. plural of lik

Etymology 3

From Old Norse líka

Adverb

like

  1. as, equally
  2. just, immediately

References

  • “like” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Scots

Etymology

From Old English līcian (to be pleasing)

Verb

like (third-person singular present likes, present participle likin, past likit, past participle likit)

  1. To like.
  2. To be hesitant to do something.
  3. To love somebody or something.

Adverb

like (not comparable)

  1. like

Interjection

like

  1. (South Scots) Used to place emphasis upon a statement.

Spanish

Etymology

From English like.

Noun

like m (plural likes)

  1. (Internet slang) like

Swedish

Adjective

like

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of lik.

Noun

like c

  1. match (someone similarly skillful)

Declension

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