Chock vs Shock what difference

what is difference between Chock and Shock

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tʃɒk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /tʃɑk/
    • Homophone: chalk (cot-caught merger)
  • Rhymes: -ɒk

Etymology 1

From Anglo-Norman choque (compare modern Norman chouque), from Gaulish *’śokka (compare Breton soc’h (thick), Old Irish tócht (part, piece)), itself borrowed from Proto-Germanic *stukkaz. Doublet of stock.

Noun

chock (plural chocks)

  1. Any object used as a wedge or filler, especially when placed behind a wheel to prevent it from rolling.
  2. (nautical) Any fitting or fixture used to restrict movement, especially movement of a line; traditionally was a fixture near a bulwark with two horns pointing towards each other, with a gap between where the line can be inserted.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

chock (third-person singular simple present chocks, present participle chocking, simple past and past participle chocked)

  1. (transitive) To stop or fasten, as with a wedge, or block; to scotch.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To fill up, as a cavity.
  3. (nautical) To insert a line in a chock.
Derived terms
  • unchock
Translations
Derived terms

(Note: chock full is not derived from this word. In fact, it is an alteration of the earlier choke-full, which most likely derives from a variant of the word cheek.)

Adverb

chock (not comparable)

  1. (nautical) Entirely; quite.

Translations

Etymology 2

French choquer. Compare shock (transitive verb).

Noun

chock (plural chocks)

  1. (obsolete) An encounter.

Verb

chock (third-person singular simple present chocks, present participle chocking, simple past and past participle chocked)

  1. (obsolete) To encounter.

Etymology 3

Onomatopoeic.

Verb

chock (third-person singular simple present chocks, present participle chocking, simple past and past participle chocked)

  1. To make a dull sound.

References

  • “chock”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016, →ISBN÷
  • chock at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Partridge, Eric (2006): Origins: A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English

Swedish

Noun

chock c

  1. shock

Declension

Related terms



English

Alternative forms

  • choque (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ʃɒk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ʃɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk, -ɑk

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch schokken (to push, jolt, shake, jerk) or Middle French choquer (to collide with, clash), from Old Dutch *skokkan (to shake up and down, shog), from Proto-Germanic *skukkaną (to move, shake, tremble). Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *skakaną (to shake, stir), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kAg’-, *(s)keg- (to shake, stir); see shake. Cognate with Middle Low German schocken (collide with, deliver a blow to, move back and forth), Old High German scoc (a jolt, swing), Middle High German schocken (to swing) (German schaukeln), Old Norse skykkr (vibration, surging motion), Icelandic skykkjun (tremulously), Middle English schiggen (to shake). More at shog.

Noun

shock (countable and uncountable, plural shocks)

  1. A sudden, heavy impact.
    1. (figuratively) Something so surprising that it is stunning.
    2. A sudden or violent mental or emotional disturbance.
    3. (medicine) Electric shock, a sudden burst of electrical energy hitting a person or animal.
    4. (medicine) Circulatory shock, a medical emergency characterized by the inability of the circulatory system to supply enough oxygen to meet tissue requirements.
    5. (physics) A shock wave.
  2. (mathematics) A discontinuity arising in the solution of a partial differential equation.
Synonyms

See Thesaurus:surprise

Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ショック (shokku)
  • Korean: 쇼크 (syokeu)
Translations

Verb

shock (third-person singular simple present shocks, present participle shocking, simple past and past participle shocked)

  1. (transitive) To cause to be emotionally shocked, to cause (someone) to feel surprised and upset.
  2. (transitive) To give an electric shock to.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To meet with a shock; to collide in a violent encounter.
    • 1832, Thomas De Quincey, Klosterheim Or, the Masque
      They saw the moment approach when the two parties would shock together.
Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989) , “shock”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN

Etymology 2

Variant of shag.

Noun

shock (plural shocks)

  1. An arrangement of sheaves for drying; a stook.
    • 1557, Thomas Tusser, Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry
      Cause it on shocks to be by and by set.
    • Behind the master walks, builds up the shocks.
  2. (commerce, dated) A lot consisting of sixty pieces; a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods.
  3. (by extension) A tuft or bunch of something, such as hair or grass.
    His head boasted a shock of sandy hair.
  4. (obsolete) A small dog with long shaggy hair, especially a poodle or spitz; a shaggy lapdog.
    • 1827 Thomas Carlyle, The Fair-Haired Eckbert
      When I read of witty persons, I could not figure them but like the little shock. (translating the German Spitz)

Verb

shock (third-person singular simple present shocks, present participle shocking, simple past and past participle shocked)

  1. (transitive) To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook.

Anagrams

  • Kosch, hocks

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English shock.

Noun

shock m (invariable)

  1. shock (medical; violent or unexpected event)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English shock.

Noun

shock m (plural shocks)

  1. shock

Derived terms


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