cicatrice vs scar what difference

what is difference between cicatrice and scar

English

Etymology

From Latin cicatrix

Noun

cicatrice (plural cicatrices)

  1. (medicine) a scar
    • 1929, M. Barnard Eldershaw, A House Is Built, Chapter VII, Section viii
      Fanny’s scissors moved steadily round the armhole and slit down the sleeve, revealing a surprisingly soft white arm and shoulder. Across the shoulder was an ancient cicatrice.

Translations


French

Etymology

Learned borrowing from Latin cicātrīx.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /si.ka.tʁis/

Noun

cicatrice f (plural cicatrices)

  1. scar

Derived terms

  • cicatriciel

Further reading

  • “cicatrice” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From Latin cicatrix, cicatricem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /t͡ʃi.kaˈtri.t͡ʃe/

Noun

cicatrice f (plural cicatrici)

  1. scar

Derived terms

  • cicatrizzare

Anagrams

  • eccitarci

Latin

Noun

cicātrīce

  1. ablative singular of cicātrīx

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin cicātrīx, cicatricem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [t͡ʃikaˈtrit͡ʃe]

Noun

cicatrice f (plural cicatrice or cicatrici)

  1. scar

Declension


Spanish

Verb

cicatrice

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of cicatrizar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of cicatrizar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of cicatrizar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of cicatrizar.


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: skär, IPA(key): /skɑɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /skɑː(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English scar, scarre, a conflation of Old French escare (scab) (from Late Latin eschara, from Ancient Greek ἐσχάρα (eskhára, scab left from a burn), and thus a doublet of eschar) and Middle English skar (incision, cut, fissure) (from Old Norse skarð (notch, chink, gap), from Proto-Germanic *skardaz (gap, cut, fragment)). Akin to Old Norse skor (notch, score), Old English sċeard (gap, cut, notch). More at shard.

Displaced native Old English dolgswæþ.

Noun

scar (plural scars)

  1. A permanent mark on the skin, sometimes caused by the healing of a wound.
  2. (by extension) A permanent negative effect on someone’s mind, caused by a traumatic experience.
  3. Any permanent mark resulting from damage.
    • 1961, Dorothy Jensen Neal, Captive mountain waters: a story of pipelines and people (page 29)
      Her age-old weapons, flood and fire, left scars on the canyon which time will never efface.
Synonyms
  • cicatrice, cicatrix
Related terms
  • fire scar
  • Red Scar
  • scar tissue
Translations

Verb

scar (third-person singular simple present scars, present participle scarring, simple past and past participle scarred)

  1. (transitive) To mark the skin permanently.
  2. (intransitive) To form a scar.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To affect deeply in a traumatic manner.
    Seeing his parents die in a car crash scarred him for life.
Derived terms
  • battle-scarred
Translations

See also

  • birthmark

Etymology 2

From Middle English scarre, skarr, skerre, sker, a borrowing from Old Norse sker (an isolated rock in the sea; skerry). Cognate with Icelandic sker, Norwegian skjær, Swedish skär, Danish skær, German Schäre. Doublet of skerry.

Noun

scar (plural scars)

  1. A cliff or rock outcrop.
  2. A rock in the sea breaking out from the surface of the water.
  3. A bare rocky place on the side of a hill or mountain.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Latin scarus (a kind of fish), from Ancient Greek σκάρος (skáros, parrot wrasse, Sparisoma cretense, syn. Scarus cretensis).

Noun

scar (plural scars)

  1. A marine food fish, the scarus or parrotfish (family Scaridae).

Anagrams

  • CRAs, RACs, arcs, ascr., cars, csar, sacr-, sarc-

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish scaraid, from Proto-Celtic *skarati, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈskaɾˠ/

Verb

scar (present analytic scarann, future analytic scarfaidh, verbal noun scaradh, past participle scartha)

  1. (transitive) sever
  2. (transitive) separate
    • 1939, Peig Sayers, “Inghean an Cheannaidhe”, printed in Marie-Louise Sjoestedt, Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Bibliothèque de l’École des Hautes Études 270. Paris: Librairie Honoré Champion, p. 194:
    Synonyms: dealaigh, deighil
  3. (transitive) tear asunder

Conjugation

  • Alternative verbal noun: scarúint (Munster)

Derived terms

  • soscartha (easily separated; isolable, adjective)

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “scaraid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • “scaraim” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 602.
  • “scar” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “scar” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • “scar” at the Historical Irish Corpus, 1600–1926 of the Royal Irish Academy.

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • ·scart

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skar/

Verb

·scar

  1. third-person singular preterite conjunct of scaraid

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