circumvent vs dodge what difference

what is difference between circumvent and dodge

English

Alternative forms

  • circumvene

Etymology

Latin circum (about) + venire (to come)

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Verb

circumvent (third-person singular simple present circumvents, present participle circumventing, simple past and past participle circumvented)

  1. (transitive) to avoid or get around something; to bypass
  2. (transitive) to surround or besiege
  3. (transitive) to outwit or outsmart

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations



English

Etymology

Uncertain, but possibly from Old English dydrian, by way of dialectal dodd or dodder.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɒdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒdʒ

Verb

dodge (third-person singular simple present dodges, present participle dodging, simple past and past participle dodged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To avoid (something) by moving suddenly out of the way.
    He dodged traffic crossing the street.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To avoid; to sidestep.
    The politician dodged the question with a meaningless reply.
  3. (archaic) To go hither and thither.
  4. (photography, videography) To decrease the exposure for certain areas of an image in order to make them darker (compare burn).
  5. (transitive) To follow by dodging, or suddenly shifting from place to place.
    • 1782, Frances Burney, Cecilia, II.iii.7:
      “I had a notion he was dodging me all the way I came, for I saw him just behind me, turn which way I would.”
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
      A speck, a mist, a shape, I wist! / And still it neared and neared: / As if it dodged a water-sprite, / It plunged and tacked and veered.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, dated) To trick somebody.

Synonyms

  • (to avoid): duck, evade, fudge, skirt, shun

Derived terms

  • dodge a bullet
  • dodger
  • dodgy

Translations

Noun

dodge (plural dodges)

  1. An act of dodging.
  2. A trick, evasion or wile. (Now mainly in the expression tax dodge.)
    • 1869, Punch (volume 57, page 257)
      “Ain’t this a rum go? This is a queer sort of dodge for lighting the streets.”
  3. (slang) A line of work.
    • 1992, Time (volume 140, issues 1-9, page 74)
      In the marketing dodge, that is known as rub-off.
    • 2009, Chris Knopf, Head Wounds (page 233)
      Through a series of unconventional circumstances, some my fault, Jackie had found herself working both civil and criminal sides of the real estate dodge, which put her among a rare breed of attorney []

Adjective

dodge (comparative more dodge, superlative most dodge)

  1. (Australia) dodgy

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