City vs Town what difference

what is difference between City and Town

English

Alternative forms

  • cyte (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English city, citie, citee, cite, from Old French cité, from Latin cīvitās (citizenry; community; a city with its hinterland), from cīvis (native; townsman; citizen), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱey- (to lie down, settle; home, family; love; beloved).

Cognate with Old English hīwan pl (members of one’s household, servants). See hewe. Doublet of civitas.

Displaced native Middle English burgh, borough (fortified town; incorporated city) and sted, stede (place, stead; city).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪti/
  • (Northern England) IPA(key): /sɪtɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsɪɾi/
  • Rhymes: -ɪti
  • Hyphenation: ci‧ty

Noun

city (plural cities)

  1. A large settlement, bigger than a town; sometimes with a specific legal definition, depending on the place.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! [] Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
  2. (Britain) A settlement granted special status by royal charter or letters patent; traditionally, a settlement with a cathedral regardless of size.
    • 1976, Cornelius P. Darcy, The Encouragement of the Fine Arts in Lancashire, 1760-1860, Manchester University Press (→ISBN), page 20
      Manchester, incorporated in 1838, was made the centre of a bishopric in 1847 and became a city in 1853. Liverpool was transformed into a city by Royal Charter when the new diocese of Liverpool was created in 1880.
    • 2014, Graham Rutt, Cycling Britain’s Cathedrals Volume 1, Lulu.com (→ISBN), page 307
      St Davids itself is the smallest city in Great Britain, with a population of less than 2,000.
  3. (Australia) The central business district; downtown.
  4. (slang) A large amount of something (used after the noun).
    It’s video game city in here!

Hypernyms

  • settlement

Derived terms

Pages starting with “city”.

Related terms

  • civic
  • civil

Descendants

  • French: City
  • German: City
  • Italian: city
  • Swedish: city

Translations

See also

  • metropolis
  • megalopolis
  • megacity
  • multicity

Further reading

  • “city” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 55.

Anagrams

  • ICTY

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡sɪtɪ]

Noun

city

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative/instrumental plural of cit

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English city. Doublet of città.

Noun

city f (invariable)

  1. city (financial district of a city)

Derived terms

  • city bike
  • city car
  • city manager

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English city.

Pronunciation

Noun

city n

  1. inner city, the commercial centre of a medium-sized or larger city
    Lite närmare city, i närheten av konstmuseet, ligger Norrköpings mest attraktiva lägenheter.

    A little closer to the town centre, next to the art museum, you’ll find Norrköping’s most attractive apartments.
    Det finns mycket att förbättra i vårt city.

    There are many things that need improvement in our inner city.

Usage notes

  • centrum is used for the commercial centre of suburbs and small or medium-sized towns.

Synonyms

  • centrum
  • innerstad


English

Alternative forms

  • tahn, tawn (Bermuda),
  • toune, towne (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English town, toun, from Old English tūn (enclosure, garden), from Proto-Germanic *tūną (fence) (compare West Frisian tún, Dutch tuin (garden), German Zaun, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian tun), from Gaulish dūnom (hill, hillfort), from Proto-Celtic *dūnom (compare archaic Welsh din (hill), Irish dún (fortress)), from Proto-Indo-European *dewh₂- (to finish, come full circle). Doublet of dun. See also -ton and tine (to enclose).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /taʊn/, [tʰaʊ̯n]
  • Rhymes: -aʊn

Noun

town (countable and uncountable, plural towns)

  1. A settlement; an area with residential districts, shops and amenities, and its own local government; especially one larger than a village and smaller than a city.
  2. Any more urbanized center than the place of reference.
  3. (Britain, historical) A rural settlement in which a market was held at least once a week.
  4. The residents (as opposed to gown: the students, faculty, etc.) of a community which is the site of a university.
  5. (colloquial) Used to refer to a town or similar entity under discussion.
  6. (humorous, ironic) A major city, especially one where the speaker is located.
  7. (law) A municipal organization, such as a corporation, defined by the laws of the entity of which it is a part.
  8. (obsolete) An enclosure which surrounded the mere homestead or dwelling of the lord of the manor.
  9. (obsolete) The whole of the land which constituted the domain.
  10. (obsolete) A collection of houses enclosed by fences or walls.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Palsgrave to this entry?)
  11. (Britain, Scotland, dialect, obsolete) A farm or farmstead; also, a court or farmyard.

Usage notes

  • An urban city is typically larger than a rural town, which in turn is typically larger than a village. In rural areas, a town may be considered urban. In urban areas, a town can be considered suburban; a village in the suburbs. The distinctions are fluid and dependent on subjective perception.

Hypernyms

  • settlement

Derived terms

  • Pages starting with “town”.
  • Descendants

    • Japanese: タウン (taun)

    Translations

    See also

    • urban
    • suburban
    • rural

    Anagrams

    • nowt, wo’n’t, won’t, wont

    Middle English

    Noun

    town

    1. Alternative form of toun

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